Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Guess the part

Collapse
X
 
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Yadkin
    replied
    Right now I am working on calibration of the software for my son's cooling fan controller. I have the gauge hooked up to jumpers as part of the circuit. Yesterday my second fuel pump died, so my build took a step backwards.

    Leave a comment:


  • simplyconnected
    replied
    Yes Steve, I remember. The pitch was for folks who still need one.

    BTW, how is yours running? - Dave

    Leave a comment:


  • Yadkin
    replied
    Thanks Dave, I already bought one.

    Leave a comment:


  • simplyconnected
    replied
    It's a CHOKE for radio noise suppression (C1VV 18A952-A).

    OEM CVRs are mechanical points that open and close. When they open, some cars will produce a very annoying "tick" through your speakers.

    If you buy my wonderful solid state CVR there is no need for the choke. You can throw it away because my excellent 6-volt CVR does not pulse. It delivers a rock-steady six volts to your gauges.

    CVR stands for Constant Voltage Regulator, which is exactly what my solid state delivers, a constant voltage. The OEM version is cheap and it pulses 12-volts so that over time it AVERAGES six volts. The problem with that is, if the original CVR sticks on, it could burn out your gauges with constant 12-volts.

    This is why everyone who owns a classic Ford car or truck should buy one of my CVRs. They are guaranteed for as long as you have one. BTW, I give a deep discount for members of our forum. - Dave

    Leave a comment:


  • Yadkin
    replied
    This part is in my constant voltage regulator circuit. I don't know what it is or what it does. It seems to be copper wire windings around a metal core, covered by insulation. It has infinite resistance.

    What is it? Can I eliminate it?
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • Yadkin
    replied
    Originally posted by Yellowbird
    That's the way the bolts were on my '58 for mounting the steering column. Not sure just guessing, were they pointed to assist getting the bolts started into the nut on the assembly line? Was it faster that way?
    Lots of bolts that screw into anchored nuts have starter points, which are blunt tips, basically bullet shaped, very different than these. I've removed every nut and bolt on this car and these are the only ones shaped with points, the only exception being the carb metering screws that Dave mentioned.

    Leave a comment:


  • Yellowbird
    replied
    Originally posted by Yadkin
    That's close to my guess. They mount the steering column to the swing bracket. At least I hope so. I can't figure out what the points are for though, since they don't contact anything.
    That's the way the bolts were on my '58 for mounting the steering column. Not sure just guessing, were they pointed to assist getting the bolts started into the nut on the assembly line? Was it faster that way?

    Leave a comment:


  • Yadkin
    replied
    Originally posted by Yellowbird
    Do they mount the sterring column to the dash?
    That's close to my guess. They mount the steering column to the swing bracket. At least I hope so. I can't figure out what the points are for though, since they don't contact anything.

    Leave a comment:


  • Yellowbird
    replied
    Do they mount the sterring column to the dash?

    Leave a comment:


  • Yadkin
    replied
    The threads are 5/16"-18. I Parkerized (phosphated, same thing) them as part of the restoration.

    Here's a clue. They are part of the interior steering mechanism.

    Leave a comment:


  • simplyconnected
    replied
    They look like standard 1/4"-20 shoulder screws but they also look like the pointed ends could be for metering some kind of fluid. I never had a '64, so I don't know.
    They're phosphated, so probably not for a carb. Maybe for power steering or convertible top. - Dave

    Leave a comment:


  • Yadkin
    started a topic Guess the part

    Guess the part

    I'll confess right away that I have an ulterior motive for this one.

    Anyone know what these are for?

    Hints: 1964 TBird
    Attached Files
Working...
😀
🥰
🤢
😎
😡
👍
👎