Announcement

Collapse

Price is right

Squarebirds.org has not raised our 'paid membership' fee in over 15 years. It remains at US$20 and it will NOT raise in 2022 or 2023 (pandemic, inflation, or not). - Dave
See more
See less

EFI Installation

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • EFI Installation

    I received my EFI parts and am almost ready to install. I decided on the Edelbrock EDL-36032 fuel pump/sump because it doesn't require a return fuel line to the gas tank. However, it does require that the sump vent be connected to the fuel tank.

    I hope that someone on the forum knows how to do that. Can I drill a small hole in the top of the fuel tank and connect a hose from the sump? Could the hole be in the fuel filler neck (in the top side so that fuel won't run into the hose)?

    Thanks,
    Richard
    Richard, '66 Thunderbird Hardtop, 390FE, Edelbrock Al heads, Comp cam, Street Demon 650 carb. Visit my restoration blog at hwythunder.com.

  • #2
    Have started installing EFI system. I've verified that one can indeed connect the Edelbrock 36031 sump vent to the vented gas tank's filler neck using 5/16" fuel hose routed under the car parallel to the main fuel line. I've fabricated a mount for the pump to install it on the left front of the engine bay, next to the windshield washer pump. Now just waiting for 6AN hose connection hardware to arrive.
    PumpMount (2).jpg
    Richard, '66 Thunderbird Hardtop, 390FE, Edelbrock Al heads, Comp cam, Street Demon 650 carb. Visit my restoration blog at hwythunder.com.

    Comment


    • #3
      Our '59 Galaxie has a separate fuel tank vent tube. It enters the trunk from the filler neck, loops high then comes back outside. I'm sure the idea is, if the car climbs a steep mountain with a full tank, gasoline may enter the tube but it returns to the fuel tank when the car levels. The line is simply a vent so I would think 3/16" brake line would be large enough. The speed of returning fuel or gas is unimportant. - Dave
      My latest project:
      CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

      "We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
      --Lee Iacocca

      From: Royal Oak, Michigan

      Comment


      • #4
        Thank you, Dave.

        Here's a pic of the pump installed on the bracket. I added a support to the bracket for strength.

        PumpInstalled.jpg
        Richard, '66 Thunderbird Hardtop, 390FE, Edelbrock Al heads, Comp cam, Street Demon 650 carb. Visit my restoration blog at hwythunder.com.

        Comment


        • #5
          Looking forwards to your progress, keep us posted huh?
          A Thunderbirder from the Land of the Long White Cloud.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by HighwayThunder View Post
            I received my EFI parts and am almost ready to install. I decided on the Edelbrock EDL-36032 fuel pump/sump because it doesn't require a return fuel line to the gas tank. However, it does require that the sump vent be connected to the fuel tank.

            I hope that someone on the forum knows how to do that. Can I drill a small hole in the top of the fuel tank and connect a hose from the sump? Could the hole be in the fuel filler neck (in the top side so that fuel won't run into the hose)?

            Thanks,
            Richard
            Your tank has a tiny vent tube on the top, as I recall about 1/8" in diameter and I forget how it is routed. Its purpose is to keep the tank at atmospheric pressure but it does so at the expense of air quality. There was no carbon canister to capture then burn the gasoline vapors. Vapor recovery came a few years later, late 60's I think.

            Your new pump wants to vent to the tank to take advantage of the existing vapor recovery system. However you don't have one. So venting to the tank makes no sense.

            You could install a vapor recovery system. Find a late model junker and remove the canister. They are typically black plastic and about the size of a small loaf of bread. It will have electrical wires to it, a sensor that works with OBD2 to test the system, which is not needed. The one I found from a late model Ford has ports labeled "vent" and "purge". The vent is attached to the vapor source and I connected the "purge" to my air cleaner, downstream of the filter.

            Be cognisant of the need to keep fluid fuel out of the vapor lines. I installed my fuel pump in the tank using a Tanks, Inc flange and hanger bracket. The flange is on the top of the tank, and I cut a hole in the trunk floor to access it. Along with supply/ return the flange has a vent fitting, and I simply connected that through a long hose that I ran next to the fuel line, and mounted the canister inside the driver's fender. That arrangement allowed fuel to slosh into the hose. To correct the problem I installed a pint-sized aluminum bottle, a surge tank, as high as I could in the trunk. The tank vent connects to the bottom of the bottle and the vapor hose connects to the top. That way any liquid fuel that sloshes ito the surge tank drains by gravity back to the fuel tank.

            Comment


            • #7
              I'm having a heck of a time trying to decide where to put the O2 sensor. I did drill one hole in the exhaust for it on the right side (red dot in pic) but I misjudged the clearance to the underbody. Too close to fit.
              exhaustpipes.jpg
              For those who have installed EFI, where did you locate the sensor?

              Thanks,
              Richard
              Richard, '66 Thunderbird Hardtop, 390FE, Edelbrock Al heads, Comp cam, Street Demon 650 carb. Visit my restoration blog at hwythunder.com.

              Comment


              • #8
                Read the manufacturer's instructions on that. A modern 5-wire O2 sensor shouldn't be too close to the manifold. Mine is under my transmission tailshaft.

                Comment


                • #9
                  About 2 foot away from manifold is ideal. I'd do it somewhere just after the bend on the side so it sits horizontal to the bottom of car.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by stubbie View Post
                    About 2 foot away from manifold is ideal. I'd do it somewhere just after the bend on the side so it sits horizontal to the bottom of car.
                    Don't want it horizontal, needs to be at an angle downhill to sensor end, so it does not collect condensation. See Pg 10

                    https://www.aemelectronics.com/sites...UEGO_Gauge.pdf
                    59-430-HT

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Got the O2 Sensor installed in the position shown below (green dot). Have connected the all the EFI wiring.
                      exhaustpipes.jpg

                      New Question. There are two 3/16" vacuum connections on the front of the throttle body, one is timed (ported) vacuum and the other full manifold vacuum. Which one should I use for the distributor vacuum advance?

                      Thanks.

                      Cheers,
                      Richard
                      Richard, '66 Thunderbird Hardtop, 390FE, Edelbrock Al heads, Comp cam, Street Demon 650 carb. Visit my restoration blog at hwythunder.com.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        EFI Components are installed. I have to replace the tank sending unit before putting gas in the tank. As soon as parts arrive, then will be ready to fire it up.
                        Cheers, Y'all,
                        Richard
                        Richard, '66 Thunderbird Hardtop, 390FE, Edelbrock Al heads, Comp cam, Street Demon 650 carb. Visit my restoration blog at hwythunder.com.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          The EFI is a Summit Max-efi500 system manufactured by Fitech.

                          The EFI install has become a frustrating months-long saga. The engine will not start because there is no fuel being injected into the throttle body. I have had Summit replace the system on their assumption that the harness was faulty. Have spoken with Summit tech support several times and Fitech as well.

                          I'm absolutely certain the wiring on my side is correct, having gone over it multiple times. I am able to communicate with the EFI computer (ECU) using the supplied handheld interface screen. I can input and save initial setup parameters in the ECU. So the ECU seems to be OK.

                          From tech support I understand that the ECU expects to see activity on the Tach Input wire to start fuel flow. There is activity on that wire (it's connected to the negative pole of the coil). However, they did not described that signal's frequency and amplitude, so I don't know if that's a problem. Tomorrow I will call Tech Support again.

                          At this point I'm convinced there is nothing wrong with the EFI system and that the problem has to be on the engine side of the install. There's a nagging feeling that the solution is something incredibly simple. One would think that Tech Support would have experience with something like this and would know.

                          Will keep posting. Thanks for your interest.

                          Cheers,

                          Richard
                          aka Highway Thunder (although not lately)
                          Richard, '66 Thunderbird Hardtop, 390FE, Edelbrock Al heads, Comp cam, Street Demon 650 carb. Visit my restoration blog at hwythunder.com.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Your motor bay looks good, I'd guess your using EFI for performance. How was the previous Street Demon 650 carb as compared to what you expect from the EFI. Do those Edelbrock A1 Heads have more and better flow than stock heads. Is the combustion chamber very different.
                            Just read about your heads being Aluminum. Also couldn't help but notice the original single reservoir master cylinder. you are good with this brake design?
                            Last edited by ricksta56; July 14, 2022, 08:33 PM.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              The problem seems to have been a bad coil. The coil's primary winding was shorted, which would have played havoc with the tach signal. Caught me off guard because the car was running when I started the changeover to EFI, hadn't suspected something like that. New coil arrives tomorrow. Will install and try again.

                              Cheers,
                              Richard
                              Richard, '66 Thunderbird Hardtop, 390FE, Edelbrock Al heads, Comp cam, Street Demon 650 carb. Visit my restoration blog at hwythunder.com.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X