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Brake lights turn off, when either blinker is turned on!

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  • #16
    If you need a copy of the Wiring Diagram for the 1964 Flairbird, here it is, right out of the Wiring Diagrams in the TRL...

    Ray Clark - Squarebirds Administrator
    The Terminator..... VTCI #11178
    Contact me via Private Message for my email address, or Call (Cell) 210-875-1411

    https://www.squarebirds.org/picture_gallery/TechnicalResourceLibrary/trl.htm

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    • #17
      Like usual, a good sounding board is always helpful, i greatly appreciate the responses an great detail, that's what i was looking for just to make sure i wasn't missing anything before i pulled the old switch. Its an OEM switch, pretty sure.

      The new switch come with a big warning to use only low wattage bulbs or leds or risk burning new switch up. Guess that was an old school trick of putting brighter bulbs in. I have no idea what's currently in there , but i would guess 1964 OEM bulbs. Don't know if the new switch considers that low wattage or not. Maybe i look into led for those lights. Shouldn't be a problem using LED, that i can tell, I'm sure they make a dual filament type led bulb for running / stop light.

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      • #18
        I purposely left out the turn signal circuit in the front (parking lights) because I did not want to add confusion.
        These lights do not energize with the brake circuits but they do with the turn signals.
        If you are interested or concerned, Your '64 can be further tested on the bench by adding:

        LH turn - Green/White (front LH) is connected with Green/Orange (rear LH) turn signals. So, BN or BU & GN/W & GN/O all have continuity with the lever down.

        RH turn - White/Blue (front RH) is connected with Orange/Blue (rear RH) turn signals. So, BN or BU & W/BU & O/BU all have continuity with the lever up.

        Remember, if you try continuity or voltage-to-ground tests while the circuits are connected, you will find parallel paths through the lamp filaments to ground. You can still test but be aware of the parallel circuits. - Dave
        My latest project:
        CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

        "We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
        --Lee Iacocca

        From: Royal Oak, Michigan

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        • #19
          I did the checks u mentioned. Appreciate the info, makes more sense. They check bad on the fomoco switch , but check good on the new switch. There is no connection to the brake lights when turn signal is activated. Im unsure what u mean by, i will know if it dont work by looking at it. I cant see anything on it or burned, etc., showing a failure. It is apparently under the switch. Just what i needed.

          The new switch comes with a large connector with 2 bullet female connectors and there are two of these connectors, unsure how it is all going back down the steering column.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by simplyconnected View Post
            ...You will know right away if your original turn signal switch is burned...
            I don't know how to make this more clear. Look at your switch contacts and wiring. Do you see discoloration? Is any insulation melted? Are all the 'points' making contact? Is the switch warped?

            Clearly, there is a difference between the new and old switches. What are those differences and why? You want to know so it doesn't happen again.

            I'm glad you resolved the problem. Now you need to install the switch. I have not installed a '65 switch but when all those wires had bullet connectors, I used a pull-wire. Your Shop Manual should have instructions. - Dave
            My latest project:
            CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

            "We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
            --Lee Iacocca

            From: Royal Oak, Michigan

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            • #21
              Thanks Dave, i was really just sayin i dont see anything visibly wrong with it. I cant take the switch apart with drillin out rivets, but there is something definitively wrong in between the the sandwich of switch plates.

              There was a small plastic bushing inside the upper bearing spring that gets compressed just above the upper bearing. I've been unable to find a reference to the plastic bushing that goes inside the spring. Unable to find a reference as to its purpose or if i need it. Other than helps keep the spring centered , if thats the case can i just wrap where the spring goes with electrical tape built up to keep it centered.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by pollolittle View Post
                ...I cant take the switch apart with drillin out rivets, but there is something definitively wrong in between the the sandwich of switch plates...
                Therefore Brian, it's broken or scrap. You may be able to drill out those rivets, fix the problem, and have a spare. OR, you can use the old switch for reference by taking pictures. Some parts may be useful later. If I can't rivet a part back together, I use small screws and nuts.

                Such is the life of a restorer. There are a lot of parts we simply cannot get so we turn to the old parts. - Dave

                My latest project:
                CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

                "We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
                --Lee Iacocca

                From: Royal Oak, Michigan

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                • #23
                  Thanks, for all the help. Update: The new blinker switch (Larry's Thunderbird) installed and lights appear to be working properly. Wow, what a bearcat to replace that beast was, I ran a wire up through and tried to fish it through, the group of wires would not go through. Tried multiple ways, so then had to run 1 or 2 wires at a time down through the column, but even that was tough. So, on to the next problem. Thanks again and posting new question.

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