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  #11  
Old 03-14-2006, 05:38 PM
peeeot peeeot is offline
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Default RE: Faulty voltage regulator?

hmmm, I was thinking that might be the case. The crankcase ventilation diagrams in the manual show the oil cap as the INLET for fresh air, not an outlet for fumes, and a pcv should be pulling air through even at idle. Just a note, my PCV valve is mounted horizontally rather than the typical vertical. Does orientation affect operation?

My brother has had the vacuum gauge so I haven't gotten to check it yet. I'll check ASAP.
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  #12  
Old 03-17-2006, 07:28 PM
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Default RE: Faulty voltage regulator?

Okay, so the vacuum gauge read a pretty steady 20.1 inches of mercury. Periodic fluctuations never went more than a hair below 20.

but guess what? I was fiddling around with the vacuum advance line because I though it strange that idle quality was not affected by having the line disconnected and not plugged. When revving the engine with my finger plugging the vac. advance line (to feel if there was suction) it revved much more smoothly!

As it turns out, with the engine at about 1100 rpms (where it starts to stumble), the spark is advanced around 30 degrees BTDC! That's just too far.

The vacuum advance or/and the distributor have been replaced at some point in this car's life. It is not the original type; it take a rubber hose rather than a threaded fitting. Should I start by replacing the vac. advance?

Or, since a remanufactured distributor is only about $20 more, should I just replace the whole thing?


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  #13  
Old 03-17-2006, 10:04 PM
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Default RE: Faulty voltage regulator?

You can look at the timing marks as a reference, but do not take them as accurate. The outer part of the harmonic balancers often if not always shift, causing the timing marks to be inaccurate. Set your initial timing at idle speed to the best vacuum and highest RPM See if the timing does advance as the RPM's go up without the vacuum advance connected. If not, then the centrifugal advance is defective. Next connect the vacuum advance. You should notice the timing advances more rapidly when the throttle is suddenly pulled. If it does not, your vacuum advance is defective.

If everything is working. drive the car. You should have the slightest bit of ping on hard acceleration. If there more ping than that, retard the ignition timing by rotating the distributor.

Ford V-8 engines used similar distributors for almost 25 years. There is a lot of interchangeability. If you do not have the correct distributor, it may not have the correct springs and weights inside the distributor, so that your advancement curve may be off.

Alexander
1959 Hardtop
1960 Golde Top
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  #14  
Old 03-18-2006, 01:17 AM
peeeot peeeot is offline
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Default RE: Faulty voltage regulator?

Since the local parts store happened to have one in stock, I went ahead and replaced the distributor. The motor is now running the best it has yet. It still is not as smooth as I'd like though. I can rev it up (slowly) to 1500 and it feels pretty good. Up any higher and it feels like a much weaker version of the same problem. A quick rev feels pretty normal.

I think there's a good chance that the old distributor was either the original or a rather old replacement. It had the same L-shaped connector for the coil terminal that is present in other places in the original wiring of the car. Also, the original coil does not have a nut on that terminal, so they match up.

I still have some tuning to do, and I will address that before looking harder at the advance/timing setup. Something has improved though.
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  #15  
Old 03-18-2006, 05:04 PM
peeeot peeeot is offline
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Default RE: Faulty voltage regulator?

Okay, I spent a good deal of time trying to tune today. I hooked up the vacuum gauge and made adjustments to timing, mixture screws, dwell, and float level. I was unable to get the engine running as well as it should, at idle or otherwise.

At this point, everything in the ignition system is new: plugs, wires, cap, rotor, distributor, points, condensor, resistor, coil. Only the low-voltage wiring is old. Every time I pull the plugs, I see evidence of a rich mixture.

Vacuum may fluctuate but it is always in spec, sometimes even a hair higher.

I feel like my carburetor has to be at fault. Any other ideas?
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  #16  
Old 03-24-2006, 09:40 AM
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Default RE: Faulty voltage regulator?

Since my carburetor is from 1964, should I be using the 1964 float level setting given by my rebuild kit, or should I be using the 1959 float setting? To put it generally, is the float setting specific to the carburetor or the vehicle?
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  #17  
Old 03-24-2006, 11:45 AM
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Default RE: Faulty voltage regulator?

I don't think it is that simple. Did the castings for the 4100 change significantly during the years? I will look at the 4100's I have, but I don't think they changed this area. A lot depends on how the motor is angled in the car.

This site shows how to adjust the 4100 on the car for a proper "wet" float setting.

http://aarc.epnet.com/application/90...r_Assembly.htm

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  #18  
Old 03-24-2006, 12:30 PM
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Default RE: Faulty voltage regulator?

For the wet float setting, I would have to know what the fuel level in the bowl is supposed to be, and I have not been able to locate such a specification anywhere. That's why I have been asking about the fuel level in relation to the holes on the booster venturis. Is this supposed to mean that the float setting is equivalent to the appropriate fuel level (I mean, if the float is set 21/32" below the top of the carburetor main body, the fuel level at idle should also be 21/32" below the top of the main body)?

I don't think there are any significant casting differences, but I don't have specs to check. Every detail of my carburetor that I can see matches up with that of any other 4100. The one thing that might have changed, unless I'm way off base on how this works, is the vertical location of the booster venturis in the barrels (which would presuppose changes in the barrel castings and maybe even the throttle plates, things I can't check by a mere visual inspection). I can't see any other reason why the float level would be different between the two. But my rebuild kit gives different specs.

Something must be different. This web site

http://www.thecarburetorshop.com/Kford.htm

lists a different carb kit part number for my carburetor (C4AF-R) than for the 1958-1959 4100s.
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  #19  
Old 03-24-2006, 03:30 PM
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Default RE: Faulty voltage regulator?

These Ford carburetors do not have an easy to adjust float level like a Holly that you can do from the outside of the carb.

What I would recommend you do is to adjust the float to the spec of year carburetor that you have. Place the carb on the car. On a warm engine running at idle, look at the primary and secondary venturis. If you see a lot of fuel dripping down, your float level is too high on at least one of the floats. Bend the tab on the float to get a slightly lower level and recheck. Remember the front and rear fuel chambers are connected, so one float can cause both fuel levels to be too high.

The early sixties 4100 I have on my '59 T-Bird worked fine right of the box, so factory float levels should get your very close to what you want.

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  #20  
Old 03-24-2006, 11:56 PM
peeeot peeeot is offline
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Default RE: Faulty voltage regulator?

Today I removed my carburetor and completely disassembled it. When I rebuilt it several months ago, our air compressor was on the fritz and I don't think it was operational at the time. So, because of that and some debris that collected in the primary fuel bowl when I first started the car up (congealed old fuel behind a fitting I hadn't been able to remove), I went at it with the compressed air and checked every passage.

I made two important discoveries. One, the smaller, inner brass tubes on the secondary booster venturi assembly were both completely blocked off with ancient, congealed gasoline. I spent at least an hour cleaning the stuff out, and was successful. Two, one of those same little tubes on the primary booster assembly was acting like it was restricted. The compressed air flowed through, but with probably less than half the velocity that it flowed through on the other side. No amount of cleaning, chemical or otherwise, that I did made any difference. Sticking a wire into the tube, I found that it would not go in as far on the obstructed side as the other. I spent a few hours trying to get it to flow better to no avail.

I put in a phone call to thecarburetorshop.com and spoke with a man for a while about carburetors, tuning, and which specs to use, etc. I used the settings for a 1964 352-equipped Galaxie listed on my rebuild kit, since that is most likely the car that my carburetor came off of (the only 1964 Ford offering listed with a 352).

When I hooked everything up and warmed the car up, there was both good and bad. The good was that the engine would at last rev up pretty smoothly. I opened the throttle very slowly as well as rapidly and the engine responded about how I'd expect at all times.

The bad was that my intake vacuum had dropped from a consistent 20+ inches down to a less-steady 18-19 inches (after a lot of time adjusting timing and mixture)and the exhaust was putting constantly (what IS that?!!?). Idle quality was down a bit in general, no matter what I did for it.

I observed some strange behavior regarding the timing. first, when accelerating the engine to nearly 2000 rpm, the spark advance (viewed with timing light) only moved a little ways past the marks, maybe to something like 15 degrees. I never saw it go higher than that, and it got up to that pretty slowly as the engine picked up revvs. What was strange was that after observing idle timing of approx. 6 degrees btdc and revving the engine, the timing at idle suddenly settled at more than 10 degrees btdc. Idle speed was the same. The distributor was secure. I re-adjusted the timing back to around 6 (vacuum was best there) and after that it seemed to stay put.

After I was done running the car, I pulled some of the plugs. One of them, #8, ALWAYS looks wet, and this had not changed. It doesn't look wet with oil; it just looks wet, and dark. I don't know what that's all about. Every other plug I pulled looked like any plug that's been burning really rich. I've done everything I know to do (short of just lowering the float past spec) to lean out the mixture but I always get rich-looking plugs.

I have to say I'm feeling pretty disappointed. My brother's '66 mustang, which has at least 100k more miles on its 200ci 6-cyl, runs smoother and more consistently than my T-Bird. I have been all over the inside of that mustang's motor and cut a LOT of corners when working on it (my brother's finances were very limited), and it was filthy inside, and had clearly never recieved any major service, but it is more responsive to tuning than my 'bird. He hasn't replaced half of the ignition components I have, either.

I'm still thinking I need to just break down and get a new carburetor, but at this point I wouldn't be surprised if that didn't make the car any more consistent in its responses to tuning.

what is wrong with my car? x(
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