This will take you to the main site where there is history, technical information and other information on these cars.
This takes you back to the main page of the forums.
This is the control panel to change your password, information and preferences on this message board.
Click here if your lost your password or need to register on this message board. You must be a registered user to post. Registration is free.
Search this board for information you need.
Click here to buy cool Squarebirds mechandise.
Click here to support Squarebirds.org. For $20 annually receive 20mBytes webspace, a Squarebirds e-mail address and member's icon on the message board.
  #1  
Old 03-10-2006, 11:59 PM
peeeot peeeot is offline
Experienced
 
Join Date: Oct 23 2005
Posts: 437
peeeot
Default Faulty voltage regulator?

Since I got my car running, the generator light has been on at all times while running and the battery is not being charged.

I started by checking out the generator. The brushes were stuck, bearings worn out and brush springs in pieces. I had a shop check the rest out and replace the bearings and springs. I guess they didn't see the need to replace the brushes because they didn't say anything about them.

With the generator reinstalled, the warning light is still on. The test procedures for the voltage regulator are very complicated and I don't have the equipment for most of them anyway. I cleaned the corroded contact points and visually inspected everything else. Still no charging. I noticed, however, that the cut-out contacts were not closing.

From what I understand in the manual, the cut-out contacts close when the generator produces enough voltage to overcome spring tension, namely 12 volts. If the points stayed closed, the battery would drain through the generator armature. I speculated that if the regulator were at fault, connecting the points by hand (forcing them shut) would result in charging and turn off the GEN light. If the generator were at fault, forcing the cutout points shut would only drain the battery quickly.

So, I tried forcing the points shut, and the GEN light went out immediately. Am I right to conclude that I have a fauly voltage regulator?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 03-11-2006, 01:58 PM
peeeot peeeot is offline
Experienced
 
Join Date: Oct 23 2005
Posts: 437
peeeot
Default RE: Faulty voltage regulator?

I did some more studying and determined that the test I did didn't prove anything. I replaced the voltage regulator anyway, though, and it took care of the problem.

In fact, I took the car for its first (very brief) drive today!!!! :7 It rode great but it was stumbling when I tried to increase RPMs. Another problem to tackle.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 03-11-2006, 05:40 PM
Alexander's Avatar
Alexander Alexander is offline
Webmaster
 
Join Date: Oct 30 2002
Posts: 3,338
Alexander is on a distinguished road
Default RE: Faulty voltage regulator?

Congratulations on your first ride. Check the timing, sse if the distributor is advancing with vacuum and rpm. Has the carburetor been rebuilt? The accelerator pump may not be working.

Alexander
1959 Hardtop
1960 Golde Top
__________________
Alexander
1959 Hard Top
1960 Golde Top
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 03-11-2006, 11:48 PM
peeeot peeeot is offline
Experienced
 
Join Date: Oct 23 2005
Posts: 437
peeeot
Default RE: Faulty voltage regulator?

I put a timing light on to verify that the spark was advancing, and it was, but once it's off the scale on the balancer it's hard for me to know whether it's advancing correctly.

As for the carburetor, it has been rebuilt. It's a 1964 unit with 48 primary and 60 secondary jets. Initially, I set the floats according the 1964 spec on the rebuild kit sheet (21/32") but after the stumbling I tried setting it to the 1959 spec (29/64"). It didn't fix the problem but it didn't dribble fuel either, so I left it there. For all it's worth, I can see the little sprays of fuel squirting in when I work the throttle as well.

I'll also note that the spark plugs show a variety of symptoms: A couple look perfect, one looks kind of wet(clear fluid), and the others mostly look rich. All give a consistent signal from the timing light.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 03-13-2006, 09:06 PM
peeeot peeeot is offline
Experienced
 
Join Date: Oct 23 2005
Posts: 437
peeeot
Default RE: Faulty voltage regulator?

Anything else to check? Any way of testing for correct advance without putting the distributor on a bench?

Voltage at the bat terminal of the coil is about 8.2 volts. Might that have anything to do with it?
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 03-13-2006, 10:00 PM
Alexander's Avatar
Alexander Alexander is offline
Webmaster
 
Join Date: Oct 30 2002
Posts: 3,338
Alexander is on a distinguished road
Default RE: Faulty voltage regulator?

An incorrect fuel level in the carburetor may make your car hesitate, as the carburetor may act inappropriately rich if the level is high or inappropriately lean if it is low. Look into the carburetor while the engine is running, if you see a lot of fuel coming down the venturis at idle, your float level is too high. The bowls of the Ford 4100 are connected, so one level misadjustment may affect the other.

Check your accelerator pump on the carburetor to make sue it is working properly.

Check for vacuum leaks between the carburetor and the manifold. Check for vacuum leaks in general.

Alexander
1959 Hardtop
1960 Golde Top
__________________
Alexander
1959 Hard Top
1960 Golde Top
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 03-14-2006, 12:26 AM
peeeot peeeot is offline
Experienced
 
Join Date: Oct 23 2005
Posts: 437
peeeot
Default RE: Faulty voltage regulator?

Looking in the carburetor with the engine running, there is no fuel visible, even after I raised the fuel level. The engine's performance was not significantly affected by the change in fuel level either, so maybe it is still too low. In the booster venturis, there are little holes from which the atomized fuel issues. Should the fuel level in the bowls be just below the bottom of these holes? This has been my theory, based on what I know about how carburetion works.

The accelerator pump squirts two little streams of fuel into the carburetor when I work the throttle. I don't know how to check the volume of fuel coming out, so I assume it's working properly.

I have only replaced one of the two carburetor gaskets, so there is a possibility of vacuum leak there. I don't have the lean mixture that (I thought) normally comes with vacuum leaks but I can at least replace the gaskets to eliminate that problem. Could an inappropriate pcv valve result in what I'm experiencing? I selected one somewhat arbitrarily.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 03-14-2006, 07:09 AM
Alexander's Avatar
Alexander Alexander is offline
Webmaster
 
Join Date: Oct 30 2002
Posts: 3,338
Alexander is on a distinguished road
Default RE: Faulty voltage regulator?

If you plug the vacuum port and remove the PCV valve, you will have your answer if the pcv valve is affecting the system. I think there is a broad range of PCV valves you can use. The spring in the PCV valve is designed in relation to how much vacuum an engine develops. I would use one from a V-8 engine of similar displacement.

Alexander
1959 Hardtop
1960 Golde Top
__________________
Alexander
1959 Hard Top
1960 Golde Top
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 03-14-2006, 04:26 PM
peeeot peeeot is offline
Experienced
 
Join Date: Oct 23 2005
Posts: 437
peeeot
Default RE: Faulty voltage regulator?

hmmm.... if I have some blowby vapors coming out of the oil filler cap/breather, does that mean I'm probably using the wrong valve, or is it normal?

Is the fuel level in the bowls supposed to be just below the booster venturi holes?
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 03-14-2006, 05:33 PM
Alexander's Avatar
Alexander Alexander is offline
Webmaster
 
Join Date: Oct 30 2002
Posts: 3,338
Alexander is on a distinguished road
Default RE: Faulty voltage regulator?

With a PCV working, you should not be getting any blowby from the oil cap. The air should be circulating into the oil cap.

What is the idle vacuum on your car?

I have a disassembled 4100 carburetor on my bench, but I cannot tell by looking at it how high the fuel level should be.

Alexander
1959 Hardtop
1960 Golde Top
__________________
Alexander
1959 Hard Top
1960 Golde Top
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:08 PM.

Driving, racing or working on cars can be hazardous. The procedures and advice on this website including the message board are opinion only. Squarebirds.org and its webmasters and contributors do not guarantee the correctness of the advice and procedures. The Squarebirds.org and its webmasters assume no liability for any damage, fines, punishment, injury or death resulting from following these procedures or advice. If you do not have the skills or tools to repair your car, please consult a professional. By using this site you agree to hold harmless the Squarebirds.org, its authors and its webmasters from any resulting claim and costs that may occur from using the information found on this site.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Any submissions to this site and any post on this site becomes property of Squarebirds.org . The webmasters reserve the right to edit and modify any submissions to this site. All material on this is site is copyrighted by the Squarebirds.org. Reproduction by any means other than for personal use is strictly prohibited. Permission to use material on this site can be obtained by contacting the webmasters. Copyright 2002-2016 by Squarebirds.org.