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  #1  
Old 12-05-2017, 12:21 PM
Deanj Deanj is offline
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Default Original Windshield or Crystal Clear

My original 1960 windshield has the look of a sandstorm survivor. It just seems inconsistent with the rest of the car. The side glass has been replaced and looks great for the most part except for one trim piece. The back window looks great.

I know it's my choice, but what opinion is there about originality? I've replaced the steering wheel, shifter, turn signal, tail lights, rocker trim, seat molding, and certainly other mechanical parts.

I'd like to keep it if polishing would remove half of the defects, but if that's not the answer, would new glass have any stigma other than make me feel better?
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  #2  
Old 12-05-2017, 12:28 PM
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Glass can be polished to remove haze or slight imperfections. If you don't want to try it yourself a glass shop will certainly do it for you. I wouldn't replace it unless it was cracked or was badly delaminating.

John
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  #3  
Old 12-05-2017, 01:04 PM
Deanj Deanj is offline
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Thanks John. I heard a novice can really screw this up, but these are nice upright windshields compared to today's front glass. I suppose the internet has a lot of YouTube videos on how to do this with a grinder-polisher.

Dean
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Old 12-05-2017, 07:55 PM
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Eastwood sells a kit. I didn't have the patience for it. The old glass is very hard.
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Old 12-06-2017, 08:01 AM
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I'm going to offer my thoughts but do what you want.

In Squarebird days, Ford's Glass Plant used batches of heated and rolled glass, cooled and cut into squares. Huge grinding and polishing machines worked both sides of all the flat glass. The square glass is then cut to the form of a windshield; any windshield, and the offal was simply recycled back into the furnace.

Later, Ford's Glass Plant used a 'continuous cast' process where the glass was floated on a molten tin bath to ensure both sides are smooth. The long ribbon never stopped as it was cut into squares 'on the fly' and stacked.

Laminated glass is two pieces of flat glass, heated and bent together as a 'matched pair'. Both panes are separated long enough to insert a sheet of vinyl, then those two pieces are re-married and the glass assembly goes into an autoclave.

It's rare to see new glass that is wavy. My point is, if the glass is old and waves are in the middle surfaces of the glass (where the vinyl is) all the polishing in the world won't help. The inside surface is also hard to polish, even if the windshield is removed. The only surface left is the outside, which is easily polished for small imperfections. Again, that is only one of four surfaces.

If it were me and the glass was very wavy, I would look for a new one. - Dave
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Old 12-06-2017, 09:01 AM
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I'd like to keep it if polishing would remove half of the defects, but if that's not the answer, would new glass have any stigma other than make me feel better?


Dean both John and Dave have good points on your windshield. Your original statement above was " I'd like to keep " so take the TBird to a couple of glass shops, see what they say and get estimates. Based on that cost make your decision, as the purchase of another windshield is a large investment.
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  #7  
Old 12-06-2017, 09:13 AM
Joe Johnston Joe Johnston is offline
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I would only consider keeping the original if the car was all original. It will look better with a clear new windshield matching the other glass. That said, there is a bit of "character" in seeing old original glass with some de-lamination at the edges of an all original car, but this only shows originality, not improved safety or restored clean bright appearance.
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  #8  
Old 12-06-2017, 10:14 AM
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Default Original Windshield or Crystal Clear

If you decide to replace that windshield, check out the Advertisements Forum and Bob's Classic Auto Glass (1-800-624-2130). There is also some information on how to etch the windshield if you want to. So check out the entry in the Advertisements Forum...
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  #9  
Old 12-06-2017, 10:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by simplyconnected View Post
I'm going to offer my thoughts but do what you want...
This is strictly, personal preference.

The picture window in our 1948 house looks like one of those carnival mirrors, with waves all over it. Robin would kill me if I replaced it. Truth is, the dogs are the only ones who look out of it as we don't spend any time in the living room.

My car is different. If I had a wave it would drive me nuts. Understand, this is something I look through every time I sit in the driver's seat. As far as originality goes, I've seen customers demand a new windshield in a brand new car for this very reason. They get one, too.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Deanj View Post
My original 1960 windshield has the look of a sandstorm survivor. It just seems inconsistent with the rest of the car. The side glass has been replaced and looks great for the most part except for one trim piece....
There goes your originality. I guess if your car is a garage queen it doesn't matter. - Dave
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  #10  
Old 12-06-2017, 12:50 PM
Deanj Deanj is offline
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Thanks. Well, I make as many bad decisions as good. There's no wavy areas ( I remember my dad's 1963 Bel Air, an ordered car, came with a distorted windshield ). I'm used to looking out of clear windshields and this ain't clear. Good thing my contacts are "crystal".

I'll try to polish this one and if I'm not happy-another 50/50 proposition-I'll replace it. I read it takes a good hour of machine polishing to see some difference.

Dean
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