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  #11  
Old 06-08-2017, 10:04 AM
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Yes the $800 was for all new guides and valves and seats.

I would not sell them if i did the work on the heads.

I bought an engine stand and lift yesterday to pull the engine.

Was starting on that process yesterday and wanted to ask yall if its just the 6 bolts that hold the trans to the engine.

Do i need to remove anything other than those 6 bolts and the motor mounts?

I am working out of a 2 car garage so i cant pull engine and trans at the same time because of not having room for the lift to turn.

As always yalls advice is greatly appreciated.

Quote:
Originally Posted by simplyconnected View Post
You're not crazy but I think you're putting good money after bad. After spending all that money, what will you end up with?

Sometimes spending a bit more money will pay off in spades later on. For instance, $800 for heads? What does that include? Do you get hardened exhaust seats and stainless valves? How about bronze guides, Viton seals and new (correct-height) springs? Are all the mating surfaces milled true? After all that you still end up with cast iron. Here's the big question, how much are these newly machined heads worth if you need to sell them? I doubt you will fetch $300 for the pair. That's a $500 loss.

Used aluminum heads fetch a grand IF you can find them, because they are snatched up right away. That's about a $350 loss. But the benefits far outweigh any loss.

FE engines run hot. Aluminum trumps all that and it still allows (factory) high compression ratios without knock. Cast iron does not. 1970 engines were designed to run on leaded gas and oil with ZDDP (zinc and phosphorus). We have neither today.

Unless you run with solid lifters, there is no reason for an adjustable valve train. Pushrods should cost under $100 per set and your original rocker arms work perfectly fine if the shafts are not scored. With any rebuild, because of decking, lifter and gasket thickness differences, you will need to measure for correct pushrod length after the heads are mounted. (It's not hard, I use a FE roller cam with my OEM rockers and shafts.)


The solution, if you want your engine to last 250,000 miles, is to build using modern materials, like a modern engine, . I'm not talking about building a race engine. I'm talking about one that will perform well and last a very long time. You describe an engine that lasts 80,000 miles before the next build.

Yes, you can cut a lot of corners but is it worth it? Not to me. The simple reduction in cast iron weight (over 100-lbs) will pay for itself in fuel economy alone over the years. It will also allow easier starts and stops, easier cornering, less tire wear, etc.

Time is on your side so use it to your advantage. Buy name-brand parts when they are discounted. Build your engine right the first and only time. This will save you the most money over the longest run.

I hope this helps. - Dave
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  #12  
Old 06-08-2017, 02:55 PM
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I would recommend that you unbolt the torque converter from the flywheel so it stays in the transmission. There are four nuts that hold it on. I also recommend that you put blocks under the front of the transmission so it doesn't drop. You also have to remove the bolt and bracket that holds the trans cooler lines to the block. After that remove the motor mount nuts on either side and the bell housing bolts. I think that's about it.

John
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  #13  
Old 06-08-2017, 03:13 PM
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thank you. I was missing that for sure. Better safe than sorry.

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Originally Posted by jopizz View Post
I would recommend that you unbolt the torque converter from the flywheel so it stays in the transmission. There are four nuts that hold it on. I also recommend that you put blocks under the front of the transmission so it doesn't drop. You also have to remove the bolt and bracket that holds the trans cooler lines to the block. After that remove the motor mount nuts on either side and the bell housing bolts. I think that's about it.

John
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  #14  
Old 06-08-2017, 05:27 PM
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Exhaust bolts are going to be fun.
I had to remove the fan and water pump to clear the radiator.
Found it easier with the PS pump off and strapped over to the side as well.
Wiggled the engine all day and never could break it loose from the transmission - finally had to pry it to get it started.



Believe one of the starter bolts goes all the way though to the bell housing and it also holds the tranny dipstick tube.

Starter must weigh 40 lbs - always fun taking it out.

Gas pedal and kick down linkages - fuel line.

Remove the inspection plate on the tranny to get to the flywheel bolts. I did as John described. Removed the 4 bolts from the torq converter and pulled the engine with the flywheel.

You can see one of the studs on the torq converter poking through the flywheel in this pic - bolt removed.



Eric
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  #15  
Old 06-08-2017, 08:07 PM
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If it is not too late, Hit one of the bolts from the flex plate with some spray paint so it goes together the same way it came apart. 180 off is not a problem but 90 off is a problem as the torque converter drain plugs hit the flex plate. Might as well just put it back the way it was and have no problems.
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  #16  
Old 06-09-2017, 03:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StealthSRT10 View Post
Hello everyone.

I will try to be brief.
I have a 1959 Thunderbird with the original 4v FE 352.

I have taken the engine apart and was going to rebuild.
Currently looking like it will be about $2200 to do start to finish. Not building a monster mostly stock.

I have found a 1965 f-100 truck with the 2V 352 running for $600.

I know it has alot less horsepower but can i swap my intake manifold and carb on it as is? If so its a great price help.

I still have to do some wiring and the brakes on the car but would like to have a running engine sooner than later.

Also i dont know if the motor mounts are the same location.

Any light yall could shed would be amazingly helpful.

Hey there ! How ya making out ?

I have to commend your resolve to stick with the original 352 powerplant.

The truck 352 oil pan will more than likely be a differing design than the 59 Bird, including the oil pump pickup tube.

Comparing the water pumps too if your truck 352 is alternator equipped.

Both motors are from the age of non-detergent motor oil so I'd like to be there when you pop the intakes. Ha !
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  #17  
Old 06-12-2017, 09:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Johnston View Post
If it is not too late, Hit one of the bolts from the flex plate with some spray paint so it goes together the same way it came apart. 180 off is not a problem but 90 off is a problem as the torque converter drain plugs hit the flex plate. Might as well just put it back the way it was and have no problems.
Well thats a good point that i didnt think about.
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  #18  
Old 06-12-2017, 09:28 AM
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So ya i bought the engine.... And i really just need to start listening to yall. Got the engine home an did a dry compression test on it and got about 40 to 50 psi on all but one cylinder and that one was about 10 psi. Then i opened the valve covers and it blows my mind how every inch of a motor can be caked in sludge. Im just gonna sell it i guess.

Should i keep the alternator that is on it.?
I need to look up info on the swap or if its worth doing. I assume my generator is working. Is there a test i can do on it maybe.

Anyways thanks for everyones help and advise. I did manage to get the engine pulled with no issues thanks to yall.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woobie View Post
Hey there ! How ya making out ?

I have to commend your resolve to stick with the original 352 powerplant.

The truck 352 oil pan will more than likely be a differing design than the 59 Bird, including the oil pump pickup tube.

Comparing the water pumps too if your truck 352 is alternator equipped.

Both motors are from the age of non-detergent motor oil so I'd like to be there when you pop the intakes. Ha !
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  #19  
Old 06-12-2017, 09:30 AM
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I did start cleaning the engine bay. And it looks alot better.

I guess a question to ask is how much more, if at all, is the car worth having the original motor as opposed to a swap.
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  #20  
Old 06-12-2017, 09:47 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by simplyconnected View Post
I look at it this way... Ford used many more 390 engines in just about everything (including Thunderbirds) than they did 352 engines. From the outside, they are identical.

Either engine from fifty or so years ago will need an overhaul.
I tried to steer you in the right direction. There are a ton of 352 engines out there that are hard to get rid of because of the reasons I mentioned.

I never spend more than $200 for a 390 because I always assume they need an overhaul. We have members who bought overhauled engines, only to find out later on that the build wasn't what they thought. I don't leave that to chance.

Good luck getting $600 out of an old tired engine. Take my advice and find a 390 to build. If you can't afford it right now, wait until you can. Don't get rid of anything until your build is complete.

Ford engines do not have VIN numbers so an 'upgrade' is hard to detect without getting into casting numbers. - Dave
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