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  #11  
Old 05-20-2017, 06:44 AM
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I totally agree that everyone should use their Shop Manual as their first resource. Section 8 in my 1959 Ford Shop Manual:



Is this the correct procedure? Ford says it is but we can get more technical for better results. When the yoke nut is properly tightened, an INCH/pound torque wrench should be used to test bearing 'drag' and it should read about 10-12 INCH/pounds of torque to move the pinion gear. What does that mean? A one-pound weight at the end of a (horizontal) 12-inch wrench should just start to move the yoke. OR, a two-pound weight at six inches (horizontal) should do the same. This should be the proper 'drag' for your pinion bearings.

I'm not in Brazil but even so, these instructions should be easy to follow anywhere in the world. - Dave
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Old 05-20-2017, 09:46 AM
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This is why I stated, that rear differentials may be best left to those with experience on the subject. These units are well engineered and generally trouble free, but, if monkeyed with, a minor misstep can lead to a major failure.

I previously stated "Study your manual concerning this unit carefully", maybe I should have stated "thoroughly". Additional study of the work shop manual, perhaps in the area of the rebuilding of the differential (9" Ford specifically), one should acquire an understanding of the function and proper procedures for servicing it; at which point one may conclude that the answer to the first question is NOOOO!

All who have been extensively exposed to service/shop manuals has at some point realized that there may be some conflict or poor presentation as printed (although such may be justified in the eyes of the author). But, the manual is the first place to reference, particularly as an introduction on the subject. And, it is with experience, that one is able to discern that which may be less than ideal.

The reference to the rotational torque values ("drag") for proper bearing preload can only be accomplished with the pinion gear disengaged from the ring gear, aka bearing support assembly removed from the differential housing (5 bolts). And this value must be addressed any time the pinion nut is turned!

Also realize that we are dealing with vehicles that aren't exactly fresh and of low mileage, and the existing bearing preload value may be suffering (may be why the seal is leaking), so even if one successfully returns all components back to their original position (your timing marks would have to be of micrometer accuracy), will this prove correct?

Additional reading/study is well advised, so as to achieve a well guided and happy outcome.

Scott.
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  #13  
Old 05-20-2017, 07:33 PM
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I've had the pinion nut off various rear ends and successfully replaced then with no issues.

I mark the position of the nut and when tightening it I do so with the rear wheels on the ground and tighten the nut until the car start to move forwards and add some Wick-In Loctite.

So far it has worked for me.
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  #14  
Old 05-20-2017, 08:04 PM
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I have too, Tom. I've also re-used the nut with no problem. The Drivetrain Engineers who designed these rear ends also wrote the Shop Manuals. The product is great and so is the manual. Did I miss the part about not re-using the nut? Come to think of it, I've never seen one fail. - Dave
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Old 05-21-2017, 10:36 AM
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I know how to read shop manuals, but i wanted to have some practical experiences, because they can be different from what is written in the manuals.
Since the Bird already has its age, i don´t know what has been done to it before, and i have some (to me more than normal) whine coming from the diff, i want to see the pinion and ring gear and check the pinion rotating torque before i remove the flange nut.
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  #16  
Old 05-21-2017, 12:34 PM
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Note, that although interesting, the rotational torque valve as tested with the pinion gear engaging the ring gear as mounted in the axle as an assembly, would include the resistance values of all components placed into motion, therefore, not isolating the bearing preload value of concern.

As far as to the other experiences, obviously various processes, on various differentials, have been practiced, over many decades, by many individuals, with varying degrees of success (as I have witnessed!), and I will always say: "if it's working for ya, well, keep it up". But, one might want to consider attempting to understand, to the best of their ability, that which they are working on, to better be capable of the positive results for which they were hoping.

As for the "nut" issue specifically, we could discuss/debate at length on the reasons why they "should" be replaced as stated, but why? They're cheap, should be available at any Ford dealer (an "A" item in inventory, must use a lot of them!), and believe me, two wrongs might get you by - but I'm right.

Remember, absorb as much information as one can, throw out that which seems suspect, and based on your own conclusions, then proceed.

Scott.
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  #17  
Old 05-22-2017, 11:32 AM
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As for the "whine" noise, if the ring & pinion is at fault due to wear, this may not be solvable with out replacing it. I have not had much luck quieting gear sets once the wear pattern has been established (but there have been exceptions). You will want to check the carrier and axle bearings as they also can be a source of noise if failed.

Still, even if the ring & pinion is at fault, it is possible that the bearing preload associated with either or both the pinion or carrier bearings has been lost and only may require "tightening-up" some. Note that what may seem "snug" to one's own hand feel may not be sufficient if one considers the deflection within the components with engine torque times transmission gear multiplication vs weight and roll resistance of the vehicle under acceleration or deceleration.

Generally, one is advised to measure the R. & P. back-lash prior to disassembly, and returning to this value upon reassembly, so as to maintain the original relationship. But, this is one of those procedures that with experience, one might be able to "cheat" some, to the betterment of the relationship (if such would seem applicable in an attempt to "quiet" the gear set some). Be aware, that with old used parts, one may not achieve the specifications as outlined from Ford for new units; adjustments must made with the understanding of the relationship of the components.

Scott.
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