This will take you to the main site where there is history, technical information and other information on these cars.
This takes you back to the main page of the forums.
This is the control panel to change your password, information and preferences on this message board.
Click here if your lost your password or need to register on this message board. You must be a registered user to post. Registration is free.
Search this board for information you need.
Click here to buy cool Squarebirds mechandise.
Click here to support Squarebirds.org. For $20 annually receive 20mBytes webspace, a Squarebirds e-mail address and member's icon on the message board.
  #11  
Old 04-06-2017, 10:39 PM
simplyconnected's Avatar
simplyconnected simplyconnected is offline
Slow Typist
 
Join Date: May 26 2009
Posts: 7,157
simplyconnected is on a distinguished road
Default

I have to explain my terminology. Normally, we reference everything from the crankshaft. This is the only true way to be correct and as you know, RH/LH is always done from the driver's viewpoint. (So, American drivers sit on the LH side AND cylinders 1-4 are on the RH side.)

When I say I advanced the cam, I am really saying I retard the crank timing. It's not confusing if you think about it. Retarding the crank will put the cam timing ahead of (before) TDC on the crank.

Another explanation: If I change cam timing by four degrees, I am really saying that the crankshaft will show eight degrees retarded when the cam is straight up. 'Straight up' is when the cam's #6 valves are dead even between the exhaust and intake, when the fuel mixture scavenges. In other words, both valves are slightly open.

We can check cam timing with the cam card as well, but I check the cam card against this valve setting, just to verify the card's accuracy. (Yes, I've had the wrong card on a cam.)

So Tom, eight crank degrees renders four cam degrees.

Ok... I've seen old timing chains stretch so much they advance the crank four degrees before they jump a tooth.

Timing chain slop can be seen with a timing light pointed at the damper pulley as the engine speed abruptly changes up and down. A new chain will give your engine quick response. e.g., Ever feel that hesitation in the gas pedal when the light turns green? A new chain removes that hesitation, just like when your engine was new. - Dave
__________________
My latest project:
CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

"We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
--Lee Iacocca

Last edited by simplyconnected : 04-06-2017 at 10:51 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 04-06-2017, 11:50 PM
scumdog's Avatar
scumdog scumdog is offline
Super-Experienced
 
Join Date: May 12 2006
Posts: 1,355
scumdog is on a distinguished road
Default

I hear you Dave.
I had a mate that builds a lot of engines come to my place and check the new cam with his degree wheel.
And I used a new Cloyes tru-roller (I think that's how they spelled it!)timing chain and gears.

I'm learning as I get older "Do it once -do it right"

Or something like that....
__________________
A Thunderbirder from the Land of the Long White Cloud.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 04-07-2017, 12:41 AM
simplyconnected's Avatar
simplyconnected simplyconnected is offline
Slow Typist
 
Join Date: May 26 2009
Posts: 7,157
simplyconnected is on a distinguished road
Default

Tom, you did it right. I bought my degree wheel many decades ago, when 'iSKY' cams were in vogue. The only redeeming quality to the wheel is that it's made of metal. Otherwise, anyone can download the artwork and paste it onto a piece of shirtboard. The same holds true for damper pulley graduations. (Notice the pointer I made from wire.)



This one also has a true roller chain. - Dave
__________________
My latest project:
CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

"We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
--Lee Iacocca
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 04-07-2017, 12:14 PM
OX1 OX1 is offline
Experienced
 
Join Date: Feb 10 2016
Posts: 255
OX1 is on a distinguished road
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Djweaz View Post
After doing all these things, I didn't have much of an issue with it as long as I didn't try to do a burnout or floor it. As long as I give it light pedal from a light it was fine. I could go 80moh on the highway no problem whatsoever. If I got caught up in bumper to bumper traffic or sitting idling it would back up flood.
.
Mine does almost exactly the same thing, except
mine will idle all day long. It's seems purely load
based, so I don't think it is a timing chain issue
(that and idle timing with light is real smooth, not
jumping around like a loose chain would).

I need to go all through the distr timing sometime
this summer. If it does turn out to be my chain is
that bad, I will wait and pull the engine/trans in
the fall to regasket both. This thing is a rocket even
at half throttle, could live with it as is forever, if needed.

I did rebuild carb and it did nothing. I don't think it
is a fuel issue unless electric pump just can't keep up.
I moved that pump to right in front of gas tank and
rewired using larger guage wire and relay that comes
off batt.
__________________
59-430-HT
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 04-08-2017, 09:21 PM
Djweaz's Avatar
Djweaz Djweaz is offline
Apprentice
 
Join Date: Apr 14 2016
Posts: 81
Djweaz is on a distinguished road
Default

So I got it running really good yesterday. Even actually let tire marks. Had a ping at the top so I adjusted it more and had to start again lol so I took a break and when I came back to it. It would start and die when you let off the key. So I jumpered the ignition to the coil and it started right up so stupid me made an actual wire to go across from the solenoid to the coil as soon as I started putting the power cable on and the wire from the coil to the started melting. I quickly removed the battery cable.. a buddy of mine says it sounds like the ballast resistor has gone bad. Problem is I can't find it or don't know what I am looking for. At first I thought it was the junction box on the passenger side just above the blower motor, it doesn't look like one from pictures that I looked up and the other guess was the junction box behind the master cylinder where the coil wire goes to on the bottom plug and is joined with a wire that goes to the solenoid. I've changed the old brittle wires from wire I had from the last wiring harness I did, but it still does the same thing. Starts and dies. Can't find a picture in the manual of either of them
__________________
Rob
1959 Thunderbird J-Code
Tbird registry
#15794
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 04-08-2017, 10:12 PM
jopizz's Avatar
jopizz jopizz is offline
Excellent Auto Mechanic for over 40 years.
 
Join Date: Nov 23 2009
Posts: 4,876
jopizz is on a distinguished road
Default

It's on the firewall to the right of the master cylinder.

John
Attached Images
File Type: jpg firewall1.jpg (103.3 KB, 31 views)
__________________
John Pizzi - Squarebirds Administrator
1959 Convertible

Thunderbird Registry #36223
jopizz@verizon.net 856-779-9695

http://www.squarebirds.org/picture_gallery/TechnicalResourceLibrary/trl.htm
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 04-08-2017, 11:26 PM
Djweaz's Avatar
Djweaz Djweaz is offline
Apprentice
 
Join Date: Apr 14 2016
Posts: 81
Djweaz is on a distinguished road
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jopizz View Post
It's on the firewall to the right of the master cylinder.

John
Excellent that's what I thought it was. I'll go buy it in the am thanks
__________________
Rob
1959 Thunderbird J-Code
Tbird registry
#15794
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 04-08-2017, 11:48 PM
YellowRose's Avatar
YellowRose YellowRose is offline
Super-Experienced and a HELLOFA nice guy
 
Join Date: Jan 21 2008
Posts: 11,935
YellowRose is on a distinguished road
Default Timing issues 430

Rob, this is what my ballast resistor on my '59 looks like, and where it is located at on the firewall right next to the MC...
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 20150701_191546-Text.jpg (89.0 KB, 32 views)
File Type: jpg BallastResistorExterior.jpg (29.0 KB, 33 views)
File Type: jpg BallastResistorInsides.jpg (27.4 KB, 32 views)
__________________

Ray Clark - Squarebirds Administrator
'59 Tbird "The Yellow Rose Of Texas" aka "Tweety Bird"
"It's Hip To Be Square"
Thunderbird Registry #33025 VTCI #11178

rayclark07"at"att.net (Home) 210-674-5781 (Cell) 210-875-1411
http://www.squarebirds.org/picture_gallery/TechnicalResourceLibrary/trl.htm
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 04-09-2017, 05:03 AM
Djweaz's Avatar
Djweaz Djweaz is offline
Apprentice
 
Join Date: Apr 14 2016
Posts: 81
Djweaz is on a distinguished road
Default

I'm going to have to read about them. I always thought they were a type of Horn relay. Hopefully this is what is causing to to start and immediately die. My buddy said that's what it is. I have noticed it die several times since I've had it and thought it was a strange way to die. Was like instantly dying. And not trying to chug and hiccup but an instant die. When I put the carb on and started it died quite a few times. As I would start it I would start getting out to set the carb up, by the time I stood up or got to the side of the carb it would die. I thought that it was that it was still trying to fill the float bowls. But when it did it yesterday I immediately thought of ignition.

Does anybody know what the other part is? Looks to be some sort of relay it's on the passenger side of the firewall. Has one wire that splits in two and is screwed on to either side. And below it has a hot wire from the solenoid
Attached Images
File Type: jpg IMG_1087 (2).JPG (30.2 KB, 30 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_1088 (2).JPG (37.2 KB, 30 views)
__________________
Rob
1959 Thunderbird J-Code
Tbird registry
#15794
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 04-09-2017, 09:12 AM
scumdog's Avatar
scumdog scumdog is offline
Super-Experienced
 
Join Date: May 12 2006
Posts: 1,355
scumdog is on a distinguished road
Default

I had a bad ballast resistor that had me pulling my hair out.

Turned out the porcelain 'rod' inside the coil was broken.

And when the coil got hot it expanded in length and bowed which then made contact with the metal mounting bracket that wraps around the resistor and shorted the circuit

But until then behaved as normal, i.e. the motor would start, run for a minute or two then die.

A 'normal' bad resistor will allow the motor to fire while the ignition key is twisted to engage the starter - but die when key is released.
__________________
A Thunderbirder from the Land of the Long White Cloud.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:17 AM.

Driving, racing or working on cars can be hazardous. The procedures and advice on this website including the message board are opinion only. Squarebirds.org and its webmasters and contributors do not guarantee the correctness of the advice and procedures. The Squarebirds.org and its webmasters assume no liability for any damage, fines, punishment, injury or death resulting from following these procedures or advice. If you do not have the skills or tools to repair your car, please consult a professional. By using this site you agree to hold harmless the Squarebirds.org, its authors and its webmasters from any resulting claim and costs that may occur from using the information found on this site.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Any submissions to this site and any post on this site becomes property of Squarebirds.org . The webmasters reserve the right to edit and modify any submissions to this site. All material on this is site is copyrighted by the Squarebirds.org. Reproduction by any means other than for personal use is strictly prohibited. Permission to use material on this site can be obtained by contacting the webmasters. Copyright 2002-2016 by Squarebirds.org.