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  #11  
Old 01-14-2017, 12:35 PM
Deanj Deanj is offline
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John, so I don't find the shroud anywhere in my manual, but it seemed to be there as depicted in your diagram.

The next question is does it make a significant difference in cooling? It would certainly make things more crowded in an AC car like mine.

BTW, I know you were asking about non-modified 1960 AC cars. The only change in mine was the switch to R134.

Last edited by Deanj : 01-15-2017 at 12:22 PM.
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  #12  
Old 01-15-2017, 12:21 AM
Tbird1044 Tbird1044 is offline
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Dean:
Just by logic, the fan shroud should improve airflow through the radiator. There is also a lot of info out there of proper fan position with a shroud. Rougly they want about 60% of the fan blade inside the shroud and 40% outside. I had to buy a thinner fan spacer to get this position. I'll include a picture of the aftermarket shroud on a stock AC 1960 with a 352.
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  #13  
Old 01-15-2017, 01:46 AM
olevet olevet is offline
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Im thinking of adding and electric fan to Front side of the Radiator and just add a simple toggle switch for on/off And just turn it on if she starts gettin hot
Anyone tried that?
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  #14  
Old 01-15-2017, 02:36 AM
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That's not a good idea because:
  • You will forget,
  • Someone else driving your car won't know, won't pay attention to your gauges or won't remember.
  • You don't want to wait until the engine overheats.
  • The cooling system should always have a reserve of some capacity.
If you put anything in the path of air flow it is a restriction. Even so, an electric fan should be thermostatically controlled OR it should automatically come on with the A/C compressor.

The thermostat should monitor RADIATOR temp, at least half way down in case you lose some coolant. And yes, sometimes I go many Michigan winter months where my electric fan never turns on.

There is such a thing as 'too much cooling' like in trucks, where they cover part of their radiator to conserve heat. Too bad we don't have that problem.
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  #15  
Old 01-15-2017, 03:54 PM
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scumdog scumdog is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by olevet View Post
Im thinking of adding and electric fan to Front side of the Radiator and just add a simple toggle switch for on/off And just turn it on if she starts gettin hot
Anyone tried that?
Exactly what I use.

After years of no fan at all I regularly check the temp gauge anyway - so knowing when to turn the fan on is second nature. (Not that I need it that much anyway - little traffic build-up, mostly open roads and NZ isn't exactly the Mojave Desert!)

"Your results may vary"
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  #16  
Old 01-15-2017, 03:59 PM
olevet olevet is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by simplyconnected View Post
That's not a good idea because:
  • You will forget,
  • Someone else driving your car won't know, won't pay attention to your gauges or won't remember.
  • You don't want to wait until the engine overheats.
  • The cooling system should always have a reserve of some capacity.
If you put anything in the path of air flow it is a restriction. Even so, an electric fan should be thermostatically controlled OR it should automatically come on with the A/C compressor.

The thermostat should monitor RADIATOR temp, at least half way down in case you lose some coolant. And yes, sometimes I go many Michigan winter months where my electric fan never turns on.

There is such a thing as 'too much cooling' like in trucks, where they cover part of their radiator to conserve heat. Too bad we don't have that problem.
Forget? Very possible
Some one else driving my Bird? Aint gonna happen
Wasnt planning on waiting till it overheated.
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  #17  
Old 05-31-2017, 06:35 AM
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c4clewis c4clewis is offline
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Did you ever get your temps down? I'm down in Louisiana, and with the engine .30 over, headers, and A/C, I can't keep the temps down with the stock radiator. I've had the original radiator cleaned and rodded, and added the fan shroud. I still couldn't keep it off the "H" driving around town last summer, when I would shoot the surge tank with an infrared gun, the temps were around 220F, higher than I would like.

I was also looking at the US Radiator Optima, but their website email doesn't work and I'm out in Afghanistan through the winter. I'm trying to have any parts waiting on me when I get home. You know, something to do!

I also stumbled upon this one today.... http://classicfordradiator.com/58-60...oRadiator.aspx
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  #18  
Old 05-31-2017, 02:00 PM
RustyNCa RustyNCa is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by c4clewis View Post
Did you ever get your temps down? I'm down in Louisiana, and with the engine .30 over, headers, and A/C, I can't keep the temps down with the stock radiator. I've had the original radiator cleaned and rodded, and added the fan shroud. I still couldn't keep it off the "H" driving around town last summer, when I would shoot the surge tank with an infrared gun, the temps were around 220F, higher than I would like.

I was also looking at the US Radiator Optima, but their website email doesn't work and I'm out in Afghanistan through the winter. I'm trying to have any parts waiting on me when I get home. You know, something to do!

I also stumbled upon this one today.... http://classicfordradiator.com/58-60...oRadiator.aspx
I wonder if that is similar to what I ended up with? I had my stock radiator recored recently with a high performance core. But it was thicker than the stock core by probably .5"? I also pulled the heavy duty clutch fan I was running and converted over to dual electric fans with a thermostatically controlled switch.

I didn't switch the fan out because of cooling issues though, I'd never had a problem with running hot. For one, the original core was done, but pretty impressive that it had been in use since 1958, about 59 years... The other reason was, I had no room for the traditional fan and radiator location. I would guess I have moved my radiator forward three maybe more inches forward of the stock location at this point.

Cheers
Bryan
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  #19  
Old 06-01-2017, 04:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dakota Boy View Post
then perhaps my original radiator is not as clean inside as I am assuming.
I put this through a block and radiator of another classic vehicle I have, but only the "flush" parts, not the coolant.

http://liquidintelligence.com.au/pro...ing-repair-kit

It is an Australian made product and it works, guaranteed. They ship overseas as well. I also then use this instead of glycol coolants or water

https://www.evanscoolants.com.au/veh.../classic-cars/

It certainly isn't cheap but, neither are rebuilds. The comfort of not worrying about temp in the heat when you are lining up to go into a classic car show is worth it as well, especially when you drive past others with their hoods up...

It have also just put it in my 1960 bird as I have added air con to it and was concerned about temps, but the block and radiator in that one are now clean as well. Bring on summer I say....
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  #20  
Old 06-01-2017, 06:54 PM
Derbird Derbird is offline
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Here is another company to look at. http://prchotrod.com/
There are a lot of high horsepower street rods that run a radiator from PRC that have no problem with heat. They are also running good electric fans and shrouds. They have made them for Squarebirds also, I have one sitting in my shop now.
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