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  #11  
Old 11-28-2016, 07:52 PM
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Synthetic oil was developed for engines that get very hot, those with flat tappets AND turbo chargers, like aircraft and diesel trucks. Conventional oil breaks down under high heat.

Synthetic never boasted better lubricity than conventional oil but it can be used longer between changes. So, if your engine is naturally aspirated, there is no advantage in buying synthetic over conventional oil.

Don't confuse ZDDP with synthetic or conventional oil because ZDDP is used as an anti-wear lubricant that is added to oils and grease. ZDDP appears in different concentrations depending on the intended use by the oil manufacturer.

If your engine requires ZDDP, carefully scrutinize the oil BEFORE you use it. Many oil manufacturers will not offer their ZDDP numbers (like STP, although I know it is high in ZDDP). ZDDP is mainly used as a 'last ditch effort' in places that get hard metal-to-metal contact and where oiling methods may be scant (like camshaft lobes). ZDDP is 'sacrificial' in these areas meaning, it gets consumed so the concentration goes down.

Find oil with numbers that are at LEAST 1,500-PPM ZDDP. The EPA has left racing oil with viscosity of 40 or greater, alone. This fits nicely in with my Harley-Davison engine as it is air-cooled and it has flat tappets. - Dave
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  #12  
Old 11-28-2016, 08:47 PM
olevet olevet is offline
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So im ok if I just use a straight 30 weight with the Zinc, this bird wont fly more than a couple thousand miles a year if that
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  #13  
Old 11-28-2016, 09:42 PM
Yadkin Yadkin is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by olevet View Post
So im ok if I just use a straight 30 weight with the Zinc, this bird wont fly more than a couple thousand miles a year if that
30W is too thick when your engine is cold, which will be a large percentage of time since you won't be driving it a lot. Use a multi-weight like your owners manual says to.
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  #14  
Old 11-28-2016, 09:50 PM
Yadkin Yadkin is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deanj View Post
Yeah, Rotella will cost over $32 for 5 quarts. For less money there's synthetic oil. We can greatly disagree over which oil would be most appropriate and the "safest". However, I've seen more written about the superiority of synthetic than extra zinc.
Synthetic oil doesn't have the viscosity modifying additives that conventional oils need to obtain a multi-viscosity rating. The additives in conventional oil break down over time which is why the change interval is less than with synthetics. Zinc is not part of that equation. If you have flat tappets you should use an oil that has zinc in it.

My local hardware store sells Brad Penn oil for $8/ quart, designed for old cars with flat tappets. It also has an anti-rust additive that the military specifies for its vehicles, for long term storage. For 5 quarts you'll spend an extra $10 every year, but that is cheap insurance.
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  #15  
Old 11-28-2016, 10:29 PM
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I buy Shell Rotella at Menards in Sedalia Mo. for $12.97 a gallon.
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  #16  
Old 11-29-2016, 10:28 AM
Deanj Deanj is offline
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We'll never agree on this. I don't see the warning labels on oil with 800 PPM of zinc: Caution: Use Only With Zinc Additive to Your Flat Tappet Engine.
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  #17  
Old 11-29-2016, 11:58 AM
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Quote:
Zinc Dialkyldithiophosphate: Affectionately known as “ZDDP”, this miracle multi-purpose chemical and has been the chief anti-wear (AW), extreme pressure (EP), and anti-oxidant (AO) additive for decades. It is so effective and low cost that it is virtually irreplaceable, which is why it survives all efforts to remove phosphorus (P) from oils to protect the catalyst. With modern oils putting caps on the maximum P allowed, other additives are now being used to supplement this old standard, such as Molybdenum anti-wear compounds and ashless anti-oxidants. There are different types of ZDDPs including primaries, secondaries, and aryls, each with its own strengths & weaknesses, and the mix is balanced to the type of service the oil will see.
https://bobistheoilguy.com/whats-in-your-motor-oil/

Key words in bold. The extreme pressure is a cam on a flat tappet. The "other additives are now being used" aren't able to supply the need for this extreme pressure mechanism.
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  #18  
Old 11-29-2016, 04:18 PM
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byersmtrco byersmtrco is offline
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Two words
Mobil One

I run full synth in everything, new & old
my 94 S-10 191K mi, the TBird our RV
when we had it.
I run Amsoil 2050 in the Harley's
Each veh gets an oil change pet yr, weather it
needs it or not. My wife's Saturn gets 2, because it
goes10-12K per yr.
Gone are the days of Dyno oil & Eng Oil Supl (the GM term
for the zink adative- except for break-in)
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  #19  
Old 11-29-2016, 08:39 PM
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Somehow I think many of you are missing the point of ZDDP.
Why do cam companies INSIST on using their lube?
  • Cam lobes are hit and miss when it comes to lubrication.
  • Cam break-in grease is HIGH in ZDDP.
  • If the cam got a regular bath of oil, the break-in lube would simply wash away.
A thin film of ZDDP is a 'last ditch' effort to lubricate in the absence of oil flow. Since modern oil formulations drastically reduced ZDDP, 'regular oil' no longer works in classic engines. If you don't believe it, go ahead and run whatever you think is good. You will be buying a cam and lifter set soon. I just replaced one from a 1970 LTD 351W that was really bad. I replaced it with a roller cam. Now, it can run regular 10W-30 dinosaur oil. - Dave
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  #20  
Old 11-30-2016, 12:16 PM
Deanj Deanj is offline
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Okay, I'm just on the other side of the fence. I agree that re-built and new flat tappet engines need the protection of zinc for break-in. Throw in race engines with flat tappets, too. But until I see the mountain of engines destroyed by modern oils, I think it's an urban legend. Modern oils provide adequate protection because these have other additives. I will agree that oil with additional zinc is the best way to go if you agree with this philosophy, as zinc oil additives may just settle to the bottom of the pan.
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