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  #41  
Old 05-10-2016, 01:43 AM
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Default noob fuel question

Regarding the problem of opening the hood, as I recall when I had that problem, we gave the latch mechanisms and the cables a good spray with WD-40 and that fixed that problem.
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  #42  
Old 05-10-2016, 01:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Djweaz View Post
...I've been trying to find timing settings for a 430. Not coming across any luck...
Your Shop Manual has all the specifications. Group 2 covers Ignition. Group 2 Part 3 has the timing, electrical and vacuum advance spec's. The book gives both 352 & 430 engine spec's right next to each other. It also shows illustrations of the timing marks.

You have a Shop Manual, right?

Hesitation may be from a sloppy timing chain. Put a long wrench on your crankshaft bolt and bump it back and forth while you look at the rotor. I want to know how many degrees of slop there is before the rotor moves. - Dave
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  #43  
Old 05-10-2016, 08:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Djweaz View Post
2. Feel like timing is running a little behind adjusting with distributor. It seems to be losing power from take off. After getting to proper speed runs fine. The knock is now gone. I have strong spark now.

I've been trying to find timing settings for a 430. Not coming across any luck. I keep seeing results for a 430 Buick or a 390 Ford. Does anybody know proper setting it should be in?

Tomorrows work
I am going to check the vacuum advance to see if it is working properly or not, because of the hesitation on idle on takeoff might be it.
If it is a bad vacuum advance I'm thinking of going to MSD electronic ignition. Although I'd rather not because I am all original every place on the car
Dave is right, check your shop manual. Until you get one, try 8 degrees BTDC at idle with the vacuum advance disconnected and source vacuum plugged. Then check your mechanical advance with a timing light. The timing mark should advance smoothly with increasing RPM.

Check your vacuum advance source- it should be from the base of the carburetor below the throttle plates (full manifold vacuum).

Reconnect the vacuum advance and check the timing again. It should be somewhere in the range of 4 to 8 degrees higher at idle. Replacement vacuum advance mechanisms are "one size fits all" and are adjustable by an allen screw inside the vacuum port. Then check the total advance with your timing light and "blipping" the throttle. The advance should decrease towards 8 when the throttle is quickly opened then increase as the RPM catches up.

Then test drive the car. After warm-up, check for off-idle hesitation, smooth acceleration, and any ping or spark knock.

Hesitation could be the lack of vacuum advance, or carburetor related: your accelerator pump.

If the distributor is operating properly, you can replace your points with an electronic module and no one but you will know the difference. Buy one with a matching coil.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Djweaz View Post
Also when I close my trunk it closes a little lower than the line of the taillight casing. Should I raise them or somehow lift the trunk lid?
Check your trunk seal. If it's dry and compressed replace it. Then re-adjust the latch.
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  #44  
Old 05-10-2016, 10:19 AM
Joe Johnston Joe Johnston is offline
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Quote:
If it is a bad vacuum advance I'm thinking of going to MSD electronic ignition.
I am going to stick my nose in here and offer my 2 of advice. After this I will stay out of it.

The very first thing to do is (as advised) to remove the dist cap and rock the crank back and forth checking how much your breaker bar moves before the rotor turns. Post the approximate degree of the crank rotation here. You can replace all the stuff you want and it won't help one bit if the timing chain is worn or stretched. That is what drives the ignition and if it is worn nothing else will fix it not even the most expensive electronic ignition.

Second is to check the vacuum advance and if not working just replace it. I don't care if you still have points and condenser ignition (I still do) or the fanciest black square of plastic in there, neither will work if the chain or the advance are worn or malfunctioning.

Both of the above diagnostic checks cost nothing except a bit of time and are the basics that need to be sorted before going another step. Don't make it harder (or more expensive) than you have to. I am not a mechanic, but the basics have to be correctly diagnosed before you try to fix things that ain't broke.
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  #45  
Old 05-11-2016, 02:10 AM
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Joe Johnston, you don't stick your nose in ENOUGH! Your advice makes , it is sound and we would like to hear even more of it. - Dave
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  #46  
Old 05-11-2016, 08:11 AM
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Thank you. Hopefully I encourage more than discourage, but being an analog guy in a digital world, its difficult for me. Us old men have the advantage here - big block Fords, Morepars, & Chebbys were on our streets and went at it stop light to stop light. We have been around these cars since they were new.

We have to pass our knowledge and experience along to the new kids on the block to keep the hobby alive, without coming across as a grouchy old man (which I fail at quite often!!)

I know today's crowd is different - "lets buy several new parts all at once and that will fix it" when no one even thought about using a compression gauge to see one cylinder has no compression.

No one "reads" a vacuum gauge, or a shop manual either (which is another issue of mine!) or understands electricity not only has to get to the component, it also has to get back to the battery.

As I said, I'm not a mechanic but know where the shop manual is and the importance of basic diagnosis.

Time for another cup of coffee!
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  #47  
Old 05-11-2016, 11:17 AM
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Yes Joe, we grew up with tons of HP and loads of compression ratio. Engines were more difficult to keep in tune, spark and plug heat ranges were more critical in high compression, we dealt with vapor lock and fuel line freeze. When is the last time anyone flooded their daily driver? That commonly happened in winter from that 'extra' gas pedal pump needed to close the choke and prime the intake. When was the last time you saw 'dry gas'? Now 10% ethanol is already in our gas and it sucks up water like scotch, at the gas station and in your tank.

Our engines would load up with lead deposits around the intake valves, which was remedied by a good long trip on the highway.

Joe, we need your advice because you went through the days of non-detergent oil and you may even remember when people used alcohol in their radiator (the first antifreeze). Keep us going, Joe. Our Squarebirds were built for those conditions, before everything changed. - Dave
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  #48  
Old 05-11-2016, 11:50 AM
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To stray from the thread a bit - I was born in 1950 - don't remember alcohol use in the cars but we did in the older tractors & truck we had. Those old 6V magneto systems started easier with a crank than the starter - no reserve to run the ignition and the starter too when cold. By the early 60's I could drive the farm machinery and everything used in the winter was 12v and green Prestone! Now anti-freeze comes in almost any color you want!!

Some old timers even used kerosene in the tractor radiators - probably cheaper than alcohol.
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  #49  
Old 05-11-2016, 01:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Johnston View Post
...Morepars, & Chebbys ...
HAHAHAHAHAHA!

Born '59 here. The first car I worked on/ owned was a '72 full size Ford with a 351W that my dad bought new and gave it to me at 90k miles, floors rusted through and burning oil. In '73 the 5mph bumpers came in along with some very detrimental emission controls, and things only got worse through the mid to late 70's, while the Japanese cars were cleaning up at the dealerships.

As I recall, my dad had removed the "smog pump" from what would become my car as soon as the warranty period was over. So I had, in effect, a very simple car to work on and tune. I got to where I could do a full tune-up, including rebuilding the carburetor, in about an hour. I routinely got 18mpg. Once I ran it well past "pinning the needle"; I estimate I was going 125 or so, still accelerating. I drove that car through college and my first two jobs, put another 95k miles on her before I sold.

The whole 70's thing with the American automotive industry caused me to rethink my aspirations at becoming a mechanical engineer and finding a job in that industry. I went with my second choice, civil engineering, but kept up my hobby.
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