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  #41  
Old 11-27-2017, 12:27 PM
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Replacing the timing chain isn't that difficult. You don't have to remove the motor. You just need to remove the water pump, fuel pump and the fan shroud. You will need to unbolt the power steering pump and move it to the side. The generator bracket that bolts to the water pump will have to be removed. You don't need to remove the overflow tank unless you feel you need more room. It's only held on by two bolts. You shouldn't have to move the radiator unless the puller you use has an exceptionally long bolt. I've done many of them and if you take your time and follow the manual you shouldn't have any problems.

John
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  #42  
Old 11-28-2017, 12:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffInCarlsbad View Post
Hi Dave:

Can this be done without removing the motor? When I checked the manual, it looks like I would have to remove not just the water pump assembly, but much more. The fan, radiator overflow reservoir, etc.....
~g
As John correctly advised, 'follow your Shop Manual'. I find it much easier to remove the radiator just so it doesn't get damaged. Everything bolted to the water pump and chain housing must be removed. Take lots of pictures as you go.

This work isn't hard or technical. I would say a novice with a Shop Manual can do it in his driveway on a Saturday afternoon if he has the right tools (puller, scrapers, wrenches, rags and parts washer) and parts (new timing set, Permatex Black, Teflon thread sealer and Loctite-blue).

The very first thing I do after sliding the timing housing off is to stuff rags in the front of the oil pan just so nothing falls in. You will see when you get there. Just before re-installing the housing, I pull those rags out.

Removed parts are nasty dirty. I use diesel fuel (kerosene) and a stiff parts brush to clean everything because it has a very high flash point, it is cheap and it works well. Stay away from using gasoline and brake cleaners because they catch fire very easily.

BTW, this might be an excellent opportunity to add an electric fan if you're so inclined.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pbf777 View Post
Keep in mind, this value may also include clearance sums in the camshaft drive to distributor driven gears including an end thrust sum in each, and other clearances present within the distributor shaft to housing bushing, distributor main shaft to advance shaft, including rotation & to rotor.
Scott.
That's right which is why the valve train and ignition timing get so far out of whack. The entire stack of tolerances add up but the timing chain causes the most slop. You can imagine, when the engine is accelerating the crank sprocket is driving the cam sprocket. When decelerating, the cam sprocket is trying to drive the crank sprocket. It's that transition, right at this point when you step on the gas, that hesitation is the worst.

For a street motor, I always offset my cam. I suggest you set the new timing chain, four degrees advanced with a stock cam. Check it with your degree wheel before returning the housing. - Dave
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  #43  
Old 11-28-2017, 11:16 AM
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Default Ok, if necessary..

Ok, this sounds easy enough. Will give me a chance to clean up & paint the water pump, et al. I do use diesel to clean anything, so I am good there.

So if I cannot solve this problem at the carb level, and there's slack in the timing chain, per your earlier suggestion on how to test, I'll tackle that project during the holidays.

Thanks guys!
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  #44  
Old 11-29-2017, 06:12 AM
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When you do the test the result will speak for itself. I want to know, how many crank degrees of slop you have?

There are many areas that are not covered well in the manuals. This is one of them. The book shows how to assemble but it doesn't go into, 'how much slop is too much'.

When you buy your timing set, get one that is a 'true roller' chain. They last three times longer than OEM chains because they are more heavy duty. True Roller chains are double-row with 1/4" rollers. They resemble bicycle chain. Most sets now have the bottom sprocket with many keyways cut so you can choose your offset (or not). Also, buy a good gasket set for the timing cover and a couple for your valve covers. - Dave
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  #45  
Old 11-29-2017, 01:23 PM
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Default I'll get to this in a few weeks when I am off for the Holidays.

I'll let you know in a few weeks when I'm off for the holidays.

~g
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  #46  
Old 12-02-2017, 02:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by simplyconnected View Post

This work isn't hard or technical. I would say a novice with a Shop Manual can do it in his driveway on a Saturday afternoon if he has the right tools (puller, scrapers, wrenches, rags and parts washer) and parts (new timing set, Permatex Black, Teflon thread sealer and Loctite-blue).
6362-A
What is the "puller" you refer to in the above quote? Is it the "gear puller" you refer to in an earlier note? the manual refers to a Crankshaft Sleeve Removal tool T56P-6362-A.
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  #47  
Old 12-02-2017, 03:01 PM
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Geoff, I cover this in one of my sites: Click Here

I made the damper puller I used. It cost me about a buck to make.

The sleeve slides off with NO special tools. You will need to remove the key in the crankshaft post before sliding the sleeve off. It's all in the pictures. - Dave
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  #48  
Old 12-02-2017, 03:19 PM
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Both Autozone and Advance Auto have a loan a tool program so it won't cost you anything if you don't have the correct puller.

John
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  #49  
Old 12-02-2017, 06:08 PM
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Maybe things have changed since we replaced our '60 timing chain.

Many timing sets were advertised as fitting 58-76 Ford/Mercury FE
engines without taking into consideration of the cam button installation on the early years of the FE. Possibly up to 1963.

The removal and installation was easy to do and allowed the opportunity to wash out the oil pan.
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