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  #21  
Old 11-18-2016, 04:45 AM
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Oh BOY, Tom... If I only used my front brake on my Harley, the wet leaves would put me down in fast order. I've learned to start with the rear (my right foot) and feather the front brake (my right hand). Dirt and gravel roads follow the same procedure as wet leaves.

One time I was on Interstate 75 exit ramp, entering Interstate 94 entrance ramp when all of a sudden I could smell raw gasoline. I gave just a little gas and the rear tire started spinning. It was a weird feeling. Then I noticed a brand new Chrysler car ahead, was spewing high pressure gasoline all over the ramp. Evidently, his fuel line or filter burst.

As soon as I felt the back tire break loose I got off the gas. Thank God I didn't use my front brake or I would have been down like a dog. The gyroscopic effect of turning wheels, the fact that I sit low (it's a FXS Low Rider like this one) and the kinetic forces from velocity and mass kept me up.

I look at brake pads as sacrificial or to look at it another way, an excuse to buy more goodies from J & P Cycles. - Dave
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  #22  
Old 11-18-2016, 07:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by simplyconnected View Post
Why? Rear drums stop just as well as rear disks because rear brakes don't do much stopping, only about 25% before rear tires start dragging.

My wife's 2010 Escape has drum rears which shows how important rear disks are. - Dave
Their important for not ever having to mess with replacing/adjusting drum brakes again (and again and again..................)
That said, I'm leaving my rear drums (mostly for ease and safety of a decent emerg brake), even though my parts car has a full rear disk setup
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Last edited by OX1 : 11-18-2016 at 08:10 AM.
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  #23  
Old 11-18-2016, 12:28 PM
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That must have been scary.
Glad to see a few of us ride Harley's.
That deal with the gasoline must have been scary.
What year is your FXS?
I have a 2000 Heritage
Thunderheader, 203 cams (etc) Carbureted !!!!





Quote:
Originally Posted by simplyconnected View Post
Oh BOY, Tom... If I only used my front brake on my Harley, the wet leaves would put me down in fast order. I've learned to start with the rear (my right foot) and feather the front brake (my right hand). Dirt and gravel roads follow the same procedure as wet leaves.

One time I was on Interstate 75 exit ramp, entering Interstate 94 entrance ramp when all of a sudden I could smell raw gasoline. I gave just a little gas and the rear tire started spinning. It was a weird feeling. Then I noticed a brand new Chrysler car ahead, was spewing high pressure gasoline all over the ramp. Evidently, his fuel line or filter burst.

As soon as I felt the back tire break loose I got off the gas. Thank God I didn't use my front brake or I would have been down like a dog. The gyroscopic effect of turning wheels, the fact that I sit low (it's a FXS Low Rider like this one) and the kinetic forces from velocity and mass kept me up.

I look at brake pads as sacrificial or to look at it another way, an excuse to buy more goodies from J & P Cycles. - Dave
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 001 00 Heritage.jpg (87.4 KB, 94 views)
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  #24  
Old 11-18-2016, 01:18 PM
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I bought my Low Rider in Dec. of 1979. In fact, I was the ONLY guy to buy a Harley in the month of Dec. from my dealership (at a very good price). Of course, he didn't HAVE an '80 yet so he gave me the option to take delivery of the first new one that came from the factory, come Spring.

So, it's an '80, 80. Meaning the year is 1980 and the cubic inches are 80 (1340-cc). I did tear the shovelheads down to convert the valve seats for gasohol and I replaced the rings. I also changed first & second gears to 'police' ratios which are lower while third and fourth remain stock. Some call this Harley a '4-speed swing arm' because the frame, engine and trans are identical with 'Glides'.

Stock tires were Goodyear Eagle GTs but I changed to Dunlop. I've always loved the cast wheels because they don't flex, rust or have spokes to loosen. The bike has been so much 'my baby' that I never went to an 'evolution'. Yes, it vibrates because the engine is bolted directly to the frame but that is part of this Harley. - Dave
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  #25  
Old 11-18-2016, 04:04 PM
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I had a couple of Shovelheads. 1st one was my dad's. Another relic he bought new. A 1974 SuperGlide. He rode that for 10 years. It was hopped up. Sifton cam, heads ported & polished, etc. LONG story behind that one. Then I had an 84 Lowrider. The prev owner put spokes on it.


Back on the brake issue. Yeah, probably when I get what I have in there working properly, it'll be fine. My 72 El Camino, 87 Monte Carlo & 86 Z28 all had front disc and stopped fine.
The 65 TBird I had stopped good too. The 60 does, it's just a lot of pedal effort. I guess I just expected it to be better. The Stainless Steel Brake Corp kit is a lousy set up. It places the calipers forward, so getting a front sway bar to work was a nightmare.
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  #26  
Old 11-19-2016, 02:57 AM
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My H-D history: A '81 Sporty (cool wee bike) then a '97 Sportster 'S' (good handling and brakes) then a '01 Superglide T-Sport (Good handling, like a big Sporty) and my latest is a '05 Utraglide Classic, luxury touring, tons of luggage space and lots of comfort!

And on our coarse-chip road surfaces the front brake is all I need most of the time, that and some compression braking.

In an emergency it's: throw out all anchors, front and rear!
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  #27  
Old 11-19-2016, 11:43 AM
Yadkin Yadkin is offline
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Never had a Harley. My first bike was a Suzuki dirt bike, 250cc, two stroke, one cylinder. My best friend bought it used and broke the auto oiler on a trail ride, didn't realize it, continued riding until the engine seized. He owed me money, so I opened up his garage and took it. He asked me what I was doing, I explained that it was to pay off his debt, and he agreed. I bought a new piston and had the cylinder bored, started mixing oil in the gas and used the bike for several years until I sold it. That bike was a good introduction to street riding because I learned to dodge trees instead of traffic, as well as the experience with slippery surfaces.

My second bike was a '72 Honda 450cc twin Scramber. Half street, half trail. Four stroke, drum brakes. At 70mph it would start to oscillate, and if you cranked down on both brakes hard enough it would begin to slow down. I sold that after a year, but I developed a short list of what I wanted for my first new bike: disk brakes and cast wheels.

Enter my dream machine, a Kawasaki KZ650C. The C stood for Custom, and gave you cast wheels and triple disks. Big blue tank with gold stripes. Literally a chick magnet. I practiced emergency stops on steep downhill sections of the access roads along Rte 2 outside of my home town near Boston. I could bring that machine from 70 to 0 in a heartbeat. My dirtbike experience served me well commuting to Boston for three summers. Made several commutes Boston to NY to see my college sweetheart (our first date was a ride on that bike). After we got married and had our first child, I lost interest and sold it.
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  #28  
Old 11-19-2016, 06:50 PM
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My first Harley was a 100cc "Baja" that is still in my garage. My second was a Sportster XLS that I loved nearly as much as my Low Rider.
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  #29  
Old 11-21-2016, 10:52 AM
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I loved the Scrambler concept. The twin pipes were mounted high like a dirt bike for ground clearance. The bike was light enough that I could do a slide-stop like a kid's pedal bike. Built for dirt or street, with that compromise, it did neither all that well.
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  #30  
Old 11-22-2016, 04:34 PM
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'MY' first Harley was a 250 cc Sprint. Second one was a 1958 Sportster. (I was the 3rd owner, bought it around 1968). And it was the first Sportster sold new in my hometown. Current bike is, guess what. A Sportster. 2009 XR 1200. Great brakes. Runs awesome. Putting out just shy of 90 hp, with no internal mods. Put together my own exhaust system. 883 R headers, Ti-Force muffler. Used a coat hanger to make a template for connecter pipe then had a exhaust shop bend up the pipe. Runs great with this setup, and nice rumble sound. Really quite to. SEST tuner. Handles great. It, and I, love curves.
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