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  #11  
Old 08-12-2015, 04:37 AM
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Roger, be careful with 'consensus', especially when pondering safety issues. What may be safe for me may not be safe for someone else.

Adequate equipment and facilities are a 'must have' when pulling engines. If your hoist, chains and tools are safe enough, an engine & trans can be pulled in your driveway. Procedures and experience also play big roles. For instance, NEVER put any part of your body in a pinch point because you have everything to lose and nothing to gain.

With my cherry picker, I feel very safe with the engine & trans hoisted above my head. I wouldn't trust an 'unknown' hoist, even if someone says it's ok. Try raising a load for yourself and see how stable it is. If it seems 'rickety' or the bushings are sloppy, stop and back out of the situation. Take your time and use all your senses to 'watch' everything. Use common sense. Nylon slings can easily cut through on sharp edges where welded-link chains will hold. I never use that stupid plate that bolts to the intake manifold. Instead, I bolt directly to the heads using a spreader bar that straddles the carburetor. - Dave
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  #12  
Old 08-12-2015, 12:26 PM
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Dave - Your comments about safety are well taken. There is no car that's worth a trip to the hospital or the morgue. In my case, my mechanic and his hoist have proven safe and reliable through a number of engine extractions.

In the past, when a tranny or an engine needed serious work, it has been my practice to pull and replace everything as one unit, using a hoist. I was surprised to see that many other members split the combo into two pieces.

My question: should I remove and replace them as one unit -- or split them into two? Am I making any unforeseen problems for myself by breaking them at the bell housing? I've seen many comments already saying that they have - or will - split 'em. Of those guys who have already done this, what has been your choice and experience?
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  #13  
Old 08-12-2015, 01:06 PM
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If you were going to rebuild the transmission then I would do them as a unit if I had the correct equipment and enough help. Since you said that the transmission was already rebuilt I don't see why you would want to remove it again. You will have to remove the transmission mount and drive shaft for no reason. Plus you will have to drain the transmission or you will have fluid everywhere.

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  #14  
Old 08-12-2015, 06:33 PM
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Whether the engine/trans are in or out of the car, they still need to be split.

Is it easier to do this with the trans in the car? In my experience, it's much easier to align and rotate the assembly outside the car. Again, that's my experience.

I don't force or use bellhousing bolts to align the torque converter. I simply slide the converter all the way on the trans, then offer the studs to the flex plate. Pay close attention to the torque converter drain plugs. They mate with the flex plate holes every 180-degrees. Give the assembly a 'shake' as the two parts come closer together. When you get one nut started, rotate the crank and everything will nearly fall into place. At this point I start bellhousing bolts, evenly turning them in by hand as I 'shake' the assembly closed. Keep rotating the crank to gain access to the converter nuts for tightening.

To do this while the engine is in the car is a headache because the trans is heavy, it doesn't cooperate easily and space is cramped.

I prefer to spend as little time under the car as practical. While the driveshaft is out, check the 'U' joints. Now is the time to change them if necessary.

I have to confess, I have a spare yoke that I slide onto the transmission output shaft so it won't leak. I wire it in place and make sure the torque converter stays in the input side. If I transport the trans, I use a steel plate that holds the converter in place as it bolts to the bellhousing (much the same as the factory does it). - Dave
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