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  #21  
Old 01-06-2016, 01:48 PM
Yadkin Yadkin is offline
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Originally Posted by Daleo56 View Post




Nice install.
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  #22  
Old 01-06-2016, 01:54 PM
RustyNCa RustyNCa is offline
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Originally Posted by simplyconnected View Post
I was hoping for a more in-depth follow-up on the success or failure of this new cooler. - Dave
I know it's not the same car, but I have been running a cooler like that on my 29 Coupe for the last five or six years. Seems to be getting the job done on it.

Details on our little coupe. She has a 406 SBC with a turbo 350 transmission and a very high stall converter, so it should generate some higher than normal heat with the higher stall. In this car's case, that is the only tranny cooler I am running on it.

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  #23  
Old 01-06-2016, 02:47 PM
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Originally Posted by RustyNCa View Post
I know it's not the same car, but I have been running a cooler like that on my 29 Coupe for the last five or six years. Seems to be getting the job done on it.

Details on our little coupe. She has a 406 SBC with a turbo 350 transmission and a very high stall converter, so it should generate some higher than normal heat with the higher stall. In this car's case, that is the only tranny cooler I am running on it.

Cheers
RustyNCA
Have you ever checked the trans temp using a thermal gun to see what the actual temp gets up to say after a haul up a long uphill run?
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  #24  
Old 02-19-2016, 11:39 AM
JamesBorisPerez JamesBorisPerez is offline
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Default Mild Overheating - 1960 Thunderbird

I also have a 1960 Thunderbird, I live in San Francisco, and when I went into the city, about 3 minutes of freeway and about 45 minutes of stop and go, the car would overheat, I had a couple of 1964 Thunderbirds that did the same and I knew the engine would start to fail. I read all the forums and decided to put an 18", 2400CFM electric fan on front of the radiator. I didn't set it up for automatic operation, instead put a switch under the dash (easy access), whenever the car starts to heat up, I turn on the fan, and so far, it's helped quite a bit, I can keep the car to the e on the Temp lettering. I would like to know exactly how much the oil temp cooler helped? I want to have my engine running cool. (P.S. I not an expert, and I'm frugal)

Last edited by scumdog : 02-20-2016 at 02:51 AM.
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  #25  
Old 02-19-2016, 02:31 PM
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What is the condition of your heat riser valve?
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  #26  
Old 02-19-2016, 10:24 PM
JamesBorisPerez JamesBorisPerez is offline
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Default Mild Overheatin - 1960 Thunderbird

I'm thinking you were asking me. A few weeks ago I noticed an exhaust leak at the flange under the valve, that's when I read up on what the valve did, it was sticky. I changed the flange gasket, and while doing the process, removed the valve and sanded/grinded it a bit to remove any pits and loosen the valve. I put it together and the leak is gone, but I have a leak from the manifold gasket. I hope to replace it this week, I've loosen the bolts and bought a Remflex 3008 gasket and stainless steel allen bolts. From learned members, I understand the best process is to have a machine shop plane the manifolds, but I can't have the vehicle inop for any time. But I will not tolerate an exhaust leak.
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  #27  
Old 02-20-2016, 01:00 AM
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...(P.S. I not an expert, and I'm frugal)
Nobody on the planet is as cheap as I am. I learned this from parents who went through The Great Depression and I am the last of five.

Necessity is truly the mother of invention and when I need something I make it because I can fabricate. The result usually tickles me to no end, especially if it works well.

In the mid '50s I had a friend with an old Studebaker grocery getter in Chicago. It had a 3/4" pipe under the bench seat for the heater. The dash controls simply regulated the amount of coolant flowing through that pipe. No fans and no ducts, but it worked amazingly well. It got me thinking...

Your cooling system has a capacity. Time and degradation (blocked cores, reduced air flow, reduced coolant flow, etc.) always lowers the capacity. Either relieve the engine's heat or add cooling capacity.

That oil cooler could simply be 3/8" copper tubing bent into four rows, as long or short as you want. Being copper, means it can easily be soldered. So can steel. The end plates can hug the copper and be soldered with a bend 'leg' at the bottom for mounting screws. For fins, the tubes can include heavy but short copper wires that are soldered to the tubes. Air flowing around the tubes and copper wires WILL transfer heat better than that expensive aluminum deal shown. The wires can also add strength so the tubes don't flex and flop around.

All you need is an adapter plate for the oil filter and a hand bender for 3/8" tubing. Want to get creative? Put a long two-row behind your front bumper.

The Derale 15730 is thermostatically controlled so it won't flow until the oil is hot. A Motorcraft FL1-A filter fits perfectly for an FE engine. Jegs wants $29/ea.

Crankcase oil normally reaches ~300 degrees F., so this method will be more efficient than using coolant. Your dash gauge will not show how well the oil is cooled but it will show your engine temp, as it always did. You should notice the needle leveling off in the normal range without signs of overheating because the new cooler just relieved your engine heat. That is why we aren't hearing rave reviews but rather, cautious silence. - Dave
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  #28  
Old 02-20-2016, 02:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JamesBorisPerez View Post
I also have a 1960 Thunderbird, I live in San Francisco, and when I went into the city, about 3 minutes of freeway and about 45 minutes of stop and go, the car would overheat, I had a couple of 1964 Thunderbirds that did the same and I knew the engine would start to fail. I read all the forums and decided to put an 18", 2400CFM electric fan on front of the radiator. I didn't set it up for automatic operation, instead put a switch under the dash (easy access), whenever the car starts to heat up, I turn on the fan, and so far, it's helped quite a bit, I can keep the car to the e on the Temp lettering. I would like to know exactly how much the oil temp cooler helped? I want to have my engine running cool. (P.S. I not an expert, and I'm frugal)
A tip for driving on a street with stop lights and/or stop-go traffic.

When approaching the stop light put the car in neutral as you come to a stop and leave it that way until the light turns green.

That way the motor is not 'fighting' the brakes i.e. trying to move the car and loading itself up, the other thing is that while in neutral the fan is spinning faster and (hopefully) pulling more air through the radiator. (You also save a bit of gas!)

It worked so well for me with my '55 F100 that for 30-odd years I never even ran a fan, now I have a big-arse electric one for insurance.
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  #29  
Old 02-20-2016, 04:24 AM
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Tom, San Francisco is about 47 sq miles with nearly 900,000 people packed into it. That's about 18,700 people per sq. mile. By contrast, Auckland, NZ has about 6,700 people per square mile.

When James is talking about 45 minutes of stop and go, it's more stop than go (like every two blocks) on some of the steepest hills in America. He needs the electric fan because his engine and brakes get a workout. - Dave
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Last edited by simplyconnected : 02-20-2016 at 05:00 AM.
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  #30  
Old 02-20-2016, 05:42 PM
JamesBorisPerez JamesBorisPerez is offline
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Default Mild Overheating - 1960 Thunderbird

Thank you both, the first reply was very thought provoking, I liked the idea of an oil cooler because I've had a couple of VW Bugs, and drove a 1966 912 Porsche for 8 years as my commute car and understand the concept of "air cooled". The second reply is a tip I use, when I can, when the electric fan is on, I put the car in neutral, rev it up a bit, and the engine cools down. I was talking to a friend at work about the oil cooler idea and he also recommended a dual oil filter relocation kit. He states the greater oil capacity, the better cooling.
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