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  #21  
Old 06-24-2015, 10:21 PM
toddgilroy toddgilroy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chris58 View Post
The more i do , the more I find to do. Just keeps snowballing.
I resemble that remark.
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1960 Tbird Convertible
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  #22  
Old 06-26-2015, 05:41 AM
chris58 chris58 is offline
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Ok, all hooked up and working, just wondering what size fuse for the heater.
Thanks Chris.
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  #23  
Old 06-26-2015, 03:54 PM
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By trade I'm an Electrician, so I have an abundance of stranded copper wire. I rarely use any size under 14AWG because of two reasons; the mechanical strength in smaller wire cannot take much vibration and wattage is already low because we only have 12-volts. #14 copper wire should be protected with a 15-amp fuse. Volts times amps = watts or 12 times 15 = 180-watts (equiv. to three 60-watt light bulbs).

A cigarette lighter is a heating element that requires #10 wire and a 30-amp fuse.

Remember that the fuse protects the WIRE, with no regard for the end device. If you branch off a large wire, you MUST maintain the same size wire for the fuse that is protecting it. If you add a smaller wire, that wire becomes the fuse.

I run into this a lot... Someone has a 20-amp circuit with #12 wire (which is correct). They add two small light bulbs and a switch, then they wire the new lights with #14 wire, thinking that the lights only draw one amp each. NOOOOOO... Now the 20-amp fuse cannot protect the #14 wire that is buried in the wall.

The same holds true in your car. Maintain the correct wire size for the fuse protecting it. - Dave
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  #24  
Old 06-26-2015, 06:33 PM
chris58 chris58 is offline
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Thanks Dave, I've actually gone with slightly larger wires to the fuse box than factory for that reason, I remembered what u mentioned about not making the wires the fuse.
I've spent so many hours underneath this dashboard I'm going to make sure it's done properly.
So the heater will take a 15 amp fuse, lighter will take a 30 amp.
It's come along really well now, I can actually find everything and everything works. For someone who knew nothing about electrics it's good to get an understanding of how things work.
Thanks again for the help.
Chris.
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  #25  
Old 06-26-2015, 07:12 PM
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That's right.
The heater motor may not need 15-amps. Let's say it needs seven or so. You can certainly put another device on the same circuit, safely. After all, you don't use the heater motor all year long. You could also put a few lights on that circuit like dome, trunk or under hood lights.

I would only dedicate certain circuits if they were of utmost importance. For example, if you have an electric fuel pump. Now, that circuit should have nothing else on it. Your ignition circuit is purposely UN-fused from the factory. Ford felt that an insignificant fuse is a poor reason for your engine to stop running. Ford did use the wire as a fuse in that application, just to get you off the tracks. Everything else is fused except for the starter motor.

You know what you're doing. Plan ahead and make sure the demand is met with 20% overkill or you will blow fuses. If you stick to this guide for your sizes, your wires will not get warm at full capacity and continuous duty:
15-amp fuse should feed #14 stranded copper wire (producing 180-watts).
20-amp fuse should feed #12 stranded copper wire (producing 240-watts).
30-amp fuse should feed #10 stranded copper wire (producing 360-watts).

If you have any questions, please ask. - Dave
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  #26  
Old 06-26-2015, 07:39 PM
chris58 chris58 is offline
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The fuse board I purchased has 10 terminals at 100 amps max and I'm using a 60 amp relay.
The way I read it is basically I have 60 amps to play with correct.
So I have 7 amps for heater, 5 for voltage gauge, 5 for tacho, 30 for lighter and another 7 for the stereo. So on the 60amp relay that'd leave 6 amps remaining before I need to upgrade the relay is that correct. And obviously the correct wire from the battery.
I have got an electric fuel pump, still undecided on whether to use it or not but now I know how to wire it up I might consider it.
Chris.
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  #27  
Old 06-26-2015, 08:09 PM
Yadkin Yadkin is offline
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It's common to have more total amperage of all the fuses in the box than the box itself is rated. That's because it is unlikely that you'll have all that stuff running at the same time. Just have a 100 amp circuit breaker on the wire that supplies the box.
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  #28  
Old 06-26-2015, 08:24 PM
chris58 chris58 is offline
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Cool, that's easy enough, at the moment I've just got an in line fuse in there for testing.
True, good chance that not everything will be running, just trying to cover all bases
Cheers Chris.
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  #29  
Old 06-27-2015, 02:32 AM
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If I had a relay with a rating of 60 amps, I would use two contacts for 100 amp service.

Do you know what 'locked rotor current' is? When a motor first turns on, before the shaft actually starts turning, the inrush current is 400% of the nameplate 'full load amps'. We know this as 'locked rotor current'. It is enough to blow fuses if they are not 'slow-blow' type. This can be a nuisance if you don't make allowances by using a large enough circuit.

Locked rotor current diminishes quickly as the motor shaft starts turning because the motor actually gives voltage back, lowering the current. This explains why some circuits immediately blow fuses while others do not, even though it appears as though your total current is within the limits of the fuse or breaker.

Where this can be challenging is in motor circuits where the motor must start against an existing mechanical drag like for an air compressor where the pressure is at 60psi but must be boosted. Several seconds may pass before the motor labors up to speed, so a standard fuse won't do. Remember the relay? If it chatters (on/off several times) during this startup period the contacts may weld themselves together because current is so high.

These are cautions you should expect when designing cooling fan motor and electric fuel pump circuits that could leave your car in a precarious position if you lose electrical power. I see another application on the horizon, electric water pumps that could further save fuel economy. - Dave
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  #30  
Old 06-27-2015, 04:34 AM
chris58 chris58 is offline
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Haha you're getting a bit technical for me now Dave. I'm not to sure what you mean by 2 contacts.
I'm operating the thermo fans on a totally independent system except for the switch wire which comes of the fuse block.
When it comes to electric fuel pump that precarious position is why I actually threw it on the shelf and went mechanical.
Water pump though is something I'm considering. Easy to do with a windsor.
I think I get what you're saying, when the engine is cranking over that's the stage when the most load is on the electric system or am I way off.
Thanks Chris.
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