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  #11  
Old 12-14-2014, 05:10 PM
Joe Johnston Joe Johnston is online now
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I have never understood the desirability of the one wire system and installed a Delco 3 wire with internal reg many years ago. It has been trouble free in my 57. One side benefit is the cleaning up of the mess of wires an removal of the regulator from the inner fender.
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  #12  
Old 12-14-2014, 06:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Johnston View Post
I have never understood the desirability of the one wire system...
Here is exactly why, Joe:

Quote:
Originally Posted by chris58 View Post
... there's diagrams for the wiring but they're all Chinese too me...
...wiring not my thing and I've got a lot to learn...
You are not alone, Chris. People hear, "one wire" and they immediately think this is an easy hookup and easy to troubleshoot.

It's NOT one wire, it's really two because every electrical path needs two wires to complete a circuit.

The three-wire simply has one more small wire to sense the key switch position. The third wire is already there for you to use. GM and Ford alternators operate the exact same way and they are both equally as dependable. That opens many options for you to use whatever is most convenient (or inexpensive).

If you need to understand this diagram, ask questions. I am sure others would love to understand more as well:

I hope this helps.

If I man draw your attention... You do NOT have to use your GEN light (but I would since it's there). Look at the wires coming out of the alt, they all go to Battery +, eventually. - Dave
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  #13  
Old 12-14-2014, 07:04 PM
chris58 chris58 is offline
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Ok slowly starting to make sense. Now obviously I won't be using that style starter solenoid so which wires need to go to my new starter. I may aswell get this sorted whilst I wait for new alternator which I've just ordered.
Thanks Chris.
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  #14  
Old 12-14-2014, 07:51 PM
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Alright, this is easy. Let's start with your small push-on "S" wire. If you are using a modern 351W starter, it has a small flat "blade" terminal to energize the starter motor (from your Key Switch). Simply make a #16awg extension with a crimp-on flat blade female connector at the starter end. You can splice your new extension to the old wire or put a #10 bolt and nut on the end and push your old wire onto it. Tape it after connecting.

Every fuse needs a holder so that no mechanical vibrations or pressures upset or break the fuse. We mostly use fuse blocks for small fuses and very large single holders for mega-fuses that look like this:
<--click on the picture for the link.
Another device we use is a 'surface mounted junction block' that looks like this:

These are quality electrical parts with copper lugs and nuts. The old studs were 5/16" (8mm) so the new ones should be the same size.
Now, let's put it together...
Remove your existing Starter Solenoid (relay) and mount BOTH the fuse holder and junction block in the vacant space on your fender apron. Connect a short 'jumper' from the fuse holder to the junction block. Connect both large cables that came from your old Starter Solenoid to the same junction block stud. Done.

Now, you have provisions for the new #6awg wire to your new alternator from the fuse holder. The 'sense' wire from your alt. can connect to the new junction block stud or the battery side of your mega-fuse holder. All your old battery and starter cables can be reused.

Questions?
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  #15  
Old 12-14-2014, 08:20 PM
chris58 chris58 is offline
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Excellent. So the 'S' wire is the red/blue wire correct which comes off front of old solenoid.
The last wire on old solenoid is the + coil wire, where does this now go.
Thanks.

Last edited by chris58 : 12-14-2014 at 09:14 PM.
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  #16  
Old 12-15-2014, 12:02 AM
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Yes, "S" stands for START and "I" stands for IGNITION. "S" starts at the Key Switch and continues through the Neutral Switch.

Leave the "I" wire off. Your new starter has no provision for it but that wire isn't necessary if your battery is good.

If you want to 'bump' the engine with a remote switch, you can still do it by using the splice you made on the "S" wire and a remote button.
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Old 12-15-2014, 01:54 AM
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ok. So splice you mean run 2 connections off the 'S' wire. So where does my 12 volt to coil+ come from. Haha, I HATE wiring. But all your help is great.
Thanks Chris.
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  #18  
Old 12-15-2014, 07:02 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chris58 View Post
ok. So splice you mean run 2 connections off the 'S' wire. So where does my 12 volt to coil+ come from. Haha, I HATE wiring. But all your help is great.
Thanks Chris.
To use a 'remote start button', you simply connect one button clip to Battery + and the other to the 'S' wire.

(We determined that you will disconnect the 'S' wire from the old solenoid and splice a new wire to it for your new starter motor.)

Your ignition coil (+) terminal gets the same ballast resistor wire it always had. When you turn the key on, it makes your coil hot.
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  #19  
Old 12-15-2014, 03:38 PM
chris58 chris58 is offline
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Excellent mate. So the hot wire will be the blue/yellow wire according to thedrawing I have.
no the ignition system I have is a Mallory dissy with coil and a new ballast resister. Do I use the new resister, will it matter if I have 2 of them.
The way things are going right now I should have all my wiring done by the weekend. Thanks heaps.
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  #20  
Old 12-15-2014, 04:03 PM
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These wiring changes can be done in 1/2-hour with plenty of time to pop a Foster's.

Look at your original Ballast Resistor. The Red-Green wire comes from your Key Switch. The Blue-Yellow goes to your distributor.

If you bought a Mallory setup and it includes a Ballast Resistor, Coil and Distributor, you need to use those parts that came with this system.

Disconnect the wires from your original Ballast Resistor and remove the resistor from your firewall. Now, replace it with the Mallory Ballast Resistor. Connect the new just like the old; Red-Green feeds the resistor and Blue-Yellow feeds the Coil.

A word about Ford's color code...
Blue-Yellow may mean two things: A blue wire with a yellow trace OR a blue wire with a yellow END CAP (or terminal end).
The same holds true with Red-Green. It may be a red wire with a green stripe (trace) or a red wire with a blue END CAP.

Some folks never notice the end color or they don't understand it. Without knowing this scheme it's impossible to identify wires. Yes, some wires change colors with age but you can usually scrape down to the original colors or find a section that is not faded. - Dave
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