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  #21  
Old 12-15-2013, 02:20 PM
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Got it Door… Strange name
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  #22  
Old 12-16-2013, 12:15 AM
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I have two clocks revived and running. Also installed lights for the night time. One is running on a 750 ma transformer. The solenoid fires every 75 seconds. The one with the 200 ma transformer the solenoid fires every 13 seconds. Tomorrow I will visit my local thrift store and find a 12 vdc. 750 ma transformer then see if the solenoid fire times change on the clock with the 200 ma transformer.

The clock with the 750 ma transformer has two lights running. The transformer is warm and not hot. I plan on running the lights through a photo cell to turn on when its dark. The clock will be in the livening room under the TV.

I have a relay good wife that puts up with me.

Larry
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  #23  
Old 12-16-2013, 01:13 PM
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Anders - I agree - bezel would be a much better term - maybe headlight trim bezel. Interesting that there were not many cars at that time with hidden headlights so who knows why it is called a "headlight door" on a car with standard type headlights. Seems door would be more appropriate for cars with hidden headlights that actually reside behind a door (as below) - oh well....









Larry - sounds like the winding spring was replaced with one that is too strong on the clock that fires every 13 seconds - either that or the arm is binding on something as it tries to fly back and wind the clock. Most of the ones I've worked on are like your clock that fires every 75 seconds. Could be that a little exercise and oil will clear it up and it will get closer to the 75 second time period.
Try cleaning the points and grounds too. Sometimes if the points or grounds are dirty it doesn't give the solenoid enough current to send the winding arm back far enough.

I love how those clocks work.......

Oh - and I checked my fuse and have a 15 amp. I probably need to re-think that. I would bet the transformer would burn up before a 15 amp fuse would blow.

Eric



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  #24  
Old 12-16-2013, 02:58 PM
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Fellas, there are too many variables going on here. Normally, a clock is directly connected to a battery running at 13.5VDC no matter what car it's in.

You guys are using power supplies. Are they switching or transformer-type supplies? This makes a huge difference because a transformer builds and stores magnetism for a much greater initial wallop. Switching power supplies don't. So, 'wattage' only tells part of the story. I seriously doubt that either of your power supplies are pulling the solenoid all the way to a 'full wind', like a car battery would. Remember, as soon as the armature starts motion, it opens the contacts. Kinetic energy takes over, working against resistance until the armature rests. Did it reach the positive stop? That's the pronounced 'click' you should hear every time it cycles. Hitting that stop ensures consistency as the clock is wound to the same tension every time. Folks who have wind-up clocks know to wind them at the same time and tension for the best accuracy.

These clocks have 'brute strength' springs and huge coils. After jarring around for fifty years on washboard back roads, I have never heard of a broken spring. I've never heard of one replaced, either.

Back to the electrics... In the absence of a car battery, how do we achieve a good in-rush of current? By adding a large enough power supply or by adding enough capacitance to do the job. Capacitors don't have a voltage drop. They deliver as much as they can all at once.

These clocks were designed for use with a power source that had no drop. When the contacts close, the clock's armature is totally depleted of magnetism which causes a huge in-rush of current. That tiny little 'wall wart' experiences a direct, momentary short. There is only enough current to 'bump' the armature; certainly not enough to fully wind the clock as designed.

To prove this, connect your clocks to a charging car battery and simply time ten intervals. Then, time ten intervals using your transformer.
If they're the same then you're good. - Dave
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  #25  
Old 12-16-2013, 07:03 PM
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Hi Dave you are right I will run the test with a car battery. Why didn't I think of that ****, I guess I am to close to the forest. That will prove my thoughts on the current issue. It is time for a martini and the clock test

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  #26  
Old 12-16-2013, 10:55 PM
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The car battery made no difference in the clock recycle time. The trouble was gummy parts the solenoid arm was gummy. I cleaned the shaft and axel the solenoid operated. The recycle time is at 55 seconds will leave the clock run all night and see what the recycle time is in the morning.

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  #27  
Old 12-17-2013, 12:03 PM
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I would assume all parts are thoroughly cleaned and lightly lubed (as Eric suggested) before any tests are run simply because the parts are not free to move and don't have full range when they're dirty. Dave
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  #28  
Old 12-17-2013, 02:25 PM
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Lightly lubed is good advice from Dave - this is one case where too much of a good thing (oil) doesn't help. I've had pretty good luck lately with marvel mystery oil and using a pin to drop a small amount in the right places.

Dave - sometimes those springs just can't be re-used (like this one). Some of the clocks I probably shouldn't have bothered with......

All this one needed was a new face, hands, spring, and back plate - but at least the case was good.


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  #29  
Old 12-20-2013, 06:23 PM
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Eric
Ho do you get such great pictures? What is your secret please tell me. Think I will get a camera for me this Christmas to record the brake project on my Thunderbird. Any thoughts on what to get just for internet pictures.

Larry
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  #30  
Old 12-20-2013, 09:11 PM
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Thanks Larry - it's a Sony Cyber-shot DSC s40 4.1 mega pixels. It was a second hand buy and just ran across it. I had no idea how good or bad it would be - it was cheap was what I liked about it . I'm sure there are much better ones out there these days - mine is about 6-7 years old. I deleted a lot of bad pictures along the way - just trial and error - mostly error.
The flash is not so great in low light on a large subject like a complete under the hood pic etc.



Best advice I have had is not to zoom with the camera but take the picture at highest resolution then use your software to edit and re-size. And I don't have any fancy software - mostly just use Windows Paint.

I used Drop Shots as my picture hosting site because it was recommended by a family member back when ( I think he had stock in the company ). Not that great of a site if you use the free service like I do but it works. It would probably be better to pay the $20 per year and get the web space from Squarebirds.

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