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  #11  
Old 11-17-2013, 08:00 PM
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David,

Which radiator are you using - the original? - sorry can't remember. I had quite a bit of trouble with my original and after getting a replacement I can see that the flow is many times better on the new one. If you have an IR gun you can check the tubes on the old one and see if any are stopped up.

Do you have a standard fan off one of the old engines you can install temporarily? It will roar going down the road but might help cool at the slower speeds without the clutch.

I've read that new engines run hotter for a time until they are broken in so since it cools down maybe that's all it is. I know what you mean though - don't want to ruin it guessing.

You can definitely be off a tooth on the distributor and it will still run. Had that trouble on mine when I transferred it to the new engine.

Hope you find the trouble quick and get a chance to try that speedo out.

Eric
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  #12  
Old 11-17-2013, 09:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davidmij View Post
OK, the latest. I read on the HAMB that if you use the ported vacuum line on the carb it can mess up idling and cause a retard that can cause overheating at idle.

Edelbrock says to use the ported one so that's where I was. As soon as I switched to the full vacuum port it the car started and idles fine. However, I was at about 20 degrees still, sooo I put the timing to 10 or 11 and it almost stalled. Soooo, I turned up the carb idle and it stays running nicely. However, it still gets really hot so I had to shut it down again.

As soon as it cools to 150 again I'll try adjusting the carb idle screws.

Dave J
You should set the timing with the vacuum disconnected and plugged and the idle speed around 500 rpm so there's no mechanical advance. If you can't keep it running at that low an idle then something is amiss. 12 degrees is pretty advanced. I would shoot for 8-10. If you are seeing 20 degrees of advance at 1000 rpm with the vacuum connected that is about normal. The distributor picks up about 8 degrees of mechanical advance and about 2 degrees of vacuum advance at 1000 rpm.

I also use the full vacuum port. I find that my car runs cooler and idles smoother that way. The original Ford 4100 carburetor uses full vacuum at idle.

John
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Last edited by jopizz : 11-17-2013 at 09:55 PM.
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  #13  
Old 11-17-2013, 10:25 PM
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Well I got it sorted out (I think). After it cooled down I added more coolant and it took a bunch, about 5 to 6 quarts. I also set the timing, adjusted the idle, set the timing again, adjusted the idle and idle screws. Then I took it for a good spin, it dropped down to 190 and stayed there! YES

While in forth gear I drove at 35 to 40 then let off the gas and coasted to about 25, did that over and over for about 20 minutes. Got home, re set the timing, the idle, got it down to about 600 rpm. By the way, I had forgotten to disconnect the vacuum advance and plug it! I read several threads that said a new motor will run hot too. Sooo, I had ordered a new clutch fan from Autozone yesterday and will install it even though I think the old one is OK. The old one is from 1967 so it can't hurt to replace it. I think the radiator is OK, especially with the 67 shroud.

I'm beat, spent the last two 3 day weekends installing this motor, trans, etc all by myself. It was monster and I'm beat. Hopefully I can drive it and break it in a little here and there after work for the next couple of weeks - as well as fine tune it here and there.

Thx for the help everyone, hopefully I can break it in nice and easy and have a fine runner next Spring.

Dave J
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  #14  
Old 11-17-2013, 10:28 PM
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Glad you got it sorted out. Just make sure you don't add too much coolant. The level should be near the bottom of the overflow tank to allow for expansion. If you put your finger down the fill hole it should just touch the tip of it.

John
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  #15  
Old 11-18-2013, 02:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davidmij View Post
OK, the latest. I read on the HAMB that if you use the ported vacuum line on the carb it can mess up idling and cause a retard that can cause overheating at idle.

Edelbrock says to use the ported one so that's where I was. As soon as I switched to the full vacuum port it the car started and idles fine. However, I was at about 20 degrees still, sooo I put the timing to 10 or 11 and it almost stalled. Soooo, I turned up the carb idle and it stays running nicely. However, it still gets really hot so I had to shut it down again.

As soon as it cools to 150 again I'll try adjusting the carb idle screws.

Dave J
Ignore ported vacuum totally - it has NO place in cars such as this and is a smog-only item, a crutch to lower emmisions.
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  #16  
Old 11-18-2013, 02:36 AM
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I'm glad you got it going, too. A gallon and a half is a lot of coolant. No wonder it was overheating. I took for granted, you topped-off the coolant level as SOP. - Dave
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  #17  
Old 11-18-2013, 09:50 AM
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Actually, the builder told me to disconnect the heater hose from the core while filling it and allow the water to run out at that point. Otherwise you get too much trapped air. My helper, who knows a lot more than I do about cars, told me just to keep filling it slowly at the over flow tank and it would gradually fill as the bubbles and gurgling stopped rising.

If I was smart (big IF) I would have read the manual and seen that it takes 20 quarts, then measured as I added to know where I was at.

Oh well, live and learn. It reached 230 degrees twice, once as I was running the initial 20 minute 2000rpm break in (that I had to stop at 10 minutes because of the heat) and again when I was trying to set the timing, idle etc.
Hopefully this didn't cause any serious engine harm.

I never heard any bad noise form the lifters etc as I ran it, and it sounds good now. I'll start it and drive it tonight for about 30 minutes when i get off work.

Thx to all, and I really appreciate the help and patience from you guys as I stumble through yet another one.

regards, Dave J

PS: Dave Dare, you should set up a web site and charge for step by step trouble shooting for guys like me. Your knowledge and step by step analytical approach are a great help! thx
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  #18  
Old 11-18-2013, 11:44 AM
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The 20 minute run is to break in the aftermarket cam. You do not want to do that under load. Fix your fan clutch. You should also be using an oil high in zinc.
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  #19  
Old 11-18-2013, 01:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davidmij View Post
...PS: Dave Dare, you should set up a web site and charge for step by step trouble shooting for guys like me. Your knowledge and step by step analytical approach are a great help! thx
Hey, don't thank me. I'm simply passing-on information from the Engine Engineers who wrote the Ford Shop Manuals.

Many had Ph.D's in Metallurgy, Mechanical Engineering and a host of Scientific Research disciplines. Ford has Metallurgical Labs, Casting Development, Powdered Metal Research and Testing (for real exotic metal concoctions that cannot be machined), Welding and Metal Fusion, Heat Treat, Electroplating... and the list goes on and on. The casting guys have their own X-ray machine (which is a whole room) to scrutinize engine blocks that they just poured. To just share lunch with these masters was awesome. But, working directly with them was the highlight of my career at Ford.

I agree, everyone really needs to consult the Shop Manual before doing engine work, even if you have different ideas. Read what teams of highly educated and experienced project experts from the day were suggesting. Ford spent big bucks on these guys. Take advantage and use their knowledge. Your engine goes far deeper than what you see.

Can you imagine casting 1,000 blocks per day (plus intake manifolds, crankshafts, camshafts, flywheels rear end housings and carriers, etc.)? How about two thousand heads (plus exhaust manifolds, etc.)? Where does the iron come from and where do you store it? There isn't nearly enough scrap iron to meet the demand. (None of these castings are machined, yet.)

The Rouge had 17 plants with two foundries going every day. Dearborn Iron Foundry was just one, making FE engine castings. Dearborn Engine Plant machined the parts and assembled them for all Ford Cars and Trucks. Simply a massive operation with capacity of nearly 500,000 engines per year. Even when you see it first hand, the numbers are so huge it's hard to realize the big picture.

Here we are, fifty years later, rebuilding a small fraction of those production parts that were engineered and manufactured to run on different fuels and oils. Who would have thought... - Dave
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  #20  
Old 11-18-2013, 02:19 PM
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Thx Charlie, the builder added a quart of whatever zinc additive he uses before giving me the motor. I added 4 1/2 quarts to that and primed the motor through the dizzy hole with a 1/4 inch socket as he recommended.

What I've been using and will use on this motor is the Quaker state "Defy" oil. It has ZDDP? It's a zinc additive. Do you know if it is any good?

Dave D, I used to work at the GE factory in Albuquerque. They machined and casted airplane engine parts. The shop was 4 buildings about 1/4 mile long each. The foundry was much smaller. Anyway, the Ford factories you describe sound like they make GE look like a back yard garden compared to all of Kansas.

I do have a retired friend from LANL who has a couple of Phd's, one in metallurgical engineering. But his knowledge is of corrosives and machining plutonium.
;0)

thx again!
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