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  #1  
Old 06-18-2013, 10:15 PM
Tbird1044 Tbird1044 is offline
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Default Hi Octane Fuel?

Just reading through the old owners manual and they indicate to use the higher octane fuels in the 60 Birds. Compression ratio is showing 9.6:1 which is marginal for the older cars to run on regular fuel. For those that have a daily driver, what fuel are you using?? One day mine will be road ready.
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Old 06-19-2013, 04:47 AM
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YellowRose YellowRose is offline
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Default Hi Octane Fuel?

I am using the Hi Octane fuel in my '59 Tbird.
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Old 06-19-2013, 10:07 AM
djberson djberson is offline
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I use only high-test in every old car I drive. Sometimes I have gotten away with mid-grade, but not always so I just use high-test by routine.
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Old 06-19-2013, 11:59 PM
Tbird1044 Tbird1044 is offline
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Thanks for the input. Once I get the car on the road (if ever) it's probably worth the extra cost for the octane. When I had the engine rebuilt, I did spend the extra $$$ to install the hardened seats in the heads, so I should be okay with the unleaded gas.
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Old 06-20-2013, 08:54 AM
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Default Be awaree of Ethanol

One caveat is to stay away from ethanol fuel especially if the car sits. Our small engine reps are warning against ethanol in lawn equipment that is carburated because of damage they are seeing. Ethanol seperates over time and the moisture is causing problems. Additves help but I only use non ethanol in anything I have with a carb.
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Old 06-20-2013, 10:08 AM
djberson djberson is offline
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And good luck finding any without ethanol! It is basically nonexistant.
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Old 06-20-2013, 03:25 PM
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Grant and Jordan are both on the money. Ethanol sucks up water faster than scotch. Then, the good stuff quickly evaporates which quickly leaves fuel that is terrible.

The point is, try to keep your fuel as fresh as you can. Expect gas more than a few months old to be far inferior.

The good news is, ethanol keeps water out of your gas tank so it's less likely to rust. We used to buy 'dry gas' in the winter because of condensation. No need any more.

Ethanol also dissolves varnish deposits in your carb. (It's in 'gas treatment'.)

If you ever do find ethanol-free gas, you will be amazed how much better your engine will run. The only places I know that sell it are marinas and airports. Both places will take your wallet for a ride.
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Old 06-20-2013, 11:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by simplyconnected View Post

Grant and Jordan are both on the money. Ethanol sucks up water faster than scotch. Then, the good stuff quickly evaporates which quickly leaves fuel that is terrible.

The point is, try to keep your fuel as fresh as you can. Expect gas more than a few months old to be far inferior.

The good news is, ethanol keeps water out of your gas tank so it's less likely to rust. We used to buy 'dry gas' in the winter because of condensation. No need any more.

Ethanol also dissolves varnish deposits in your carb. (It's in 'gas treatment'.)

If you ever do find ethanol-free gas, you will be amazed how much better your engine will run. The only places I know that sell it are marinas and airports. Both places will take your wallet for a ride.

Ethanol draws water out of the atmosphere. It is OK to use with fuel systems that have closed emission tank systems, but when used in an early carbureted car (pre-1973) can cause serious fuel system problems.

Also, methanol dissolving varnish in an older fuel system cause quite a few problems.

TECH ARTICLES-

The formulation that makes up today’s gasoline blend contains ethanol (vs. MTBE) to enhance combustion. Ethanol boils at 160 degrees. Carburetors have atmospheric (bowl) vents and they allow fuel vapors to escape and reduce the fuel level in the carb fuel bowl(s). This is especially true after an engine, which has been running at operating temperature has been shut down. The under hood temps at this point well exceed 170 degrees and the carb will percolate most of if not all the fuel out into the atmosphere.

There is also increased chance of vapor lock, (aka BLEND SEPARATION). This is when the fuel actually vaporizes in the steel fuel line, preventing the carb fuel bowl(s) from maintaining needed volume, leaning out and stalling the engine.

Fuel injected cars have a closed evaporative emission system and does not have these issues with the new gasoline blends.

The above text has been taken and condensed from the below website-
http://www.studebaker-info.org/tech/...orization.html


It is the most concise and easy to understand explanation I have come across.


-UPDATING YOUR FUEL SYSTEM FOR ETHANOL (CLICK HERE)-


Quote:
Isopropyl alcohol is a major ingredient in "gas dryer" fuel additives. In significant quantities, water is a problem in fuel tanks, as it separates from the gasoline, and can freeze in the supply lines at cold temperatures. It does not remove water from gasoline; rather, the alcohol solubilizes water in gasoline. Once soluble, water does not pose the same risk as insoluble water as it will no longer accumulate in the supply lines and freeze. Isopropyl alcohol is often sold in aerosol cans as a windshield de-icer. Isopropyl alcohol is also used to remove brake fluid traces from hydraulic braking systems, so that the brake fluid (usually DOT 3, DOT 4 or mineral oil) does not contaminate the brake pads, which would result in poor braking.
SOURCE- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isopropyl_alcohol

-STA-BIL FUEL STABILIZER (CLICK HERE)-

Gasoline without methanol added can usually be found in rural/agricultural areas for farm equipment.

Last edited by KULTULZ : 06-21-2013 at 12:04 AM.
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  #9  
Old 06-20-2013, 11:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ncbird View Post
One caveat is to stay away from ethanol fuel especially if the car sits. Our small engine reps are warning against ethanol in lawn equipment that is carburated because of damage they are seeing. Ethanol seperates over time and the moisture is causing problems. Additves help but I only use non ethanol in anything I have with a carb.
I agree, Grant. Ethanol absorbs moisture from wherever it can until saturation sets in, much the same as DOT-3 brake fluid.

My home backup generator is completely dry when not in use. Sometimes I go years between power outages, sometimes only one month. Adding more crap to the gas only complicates matters. I keep fresh gas on hand in five gallon containers. When they get a couple months old, I feed them to my cars then refill the containers with fresh gas.

Last week, Detroit experienced the highest gas prices in the country. Robin & I didn't buy any until the price came down because I have good gas in reserve. - Dave
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  #10  
Old 06-21-2013, 10:02 AM
ncbird ncbird is offline
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Default sound advice

All my small engine items are kept dry when not in use. My generator (hurricanes) pressure washer etc are run dry. We are lucky here on the coast because non ethanol gasoline is easy to find. Most all of our premium is ethanol free and some stations have all ethanol free. We have a large contingent of trailer boats so that may be the reason. Our on water gas is all ethanol free at the marinas. I do use additives for my small engines as a habit I developed with the boat since they do sit. I think with our cars a suggestion is to keep the tank close to full and to watch the fuel hoses since ethanol can eat early rubber hoses. I am sure glad I have the govt looking out for me, gas that damages my fuel system and diesel that eats orings.
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