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  #1  
Old 05-18-2013, 07:51 PM
lnoska lnoska is offline
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Default The wife smells gasoline

I have been driving my 1960 Thunderbird a bit the last few weeks. My sweetheart commented the other day that there was a strong gasoline smell in the garage after I parked the car. The smell would go away after a bit. I have not driven the car in a week and there has been no gas smell. I am guessing I have a carburetor problem. I am thinking the float is out of adjustment.
Has anybody experienced this problem? Can anybody give me some guidance on where to look, and a possible solution to the problem?
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  #2  
Old 05-18-2013, 10:12 PM
Richard D. Hord Richard D. Hord is offline
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Hey Larry,
It maybe your fill cap on the gas tank. They are vented and sometimes you get a gas smell.
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  #3  
Old 05-19-2013, 02:25 AM
KULTULZ
 
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Fumes are a funny thing. I can sit in traffic and smell a carbureted car, especially older models with no emissions controls.
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  #4  
Old 05-19-2013, 08:15 AM
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If, with identical circumstances, she can smell it now but could not smell it, say, a few weeks ago, then something has changed and needs attention.

First thing might be to narrow it down - front or rear? I would put some dark paper under the front of the car and see if anything drips.

The newer gasolines (ethanol added) can attack hoses up front. Or it could be as simple as a hose clamp or fitting that has loosened up.

In case the fuel pump has problems, check your oil and see if there is any smell or increase in level. A bad diaphram can allow gas into the motor, most undesireable.

The seal around the sending unit in the trunk may be ancient and leaky.

One thing for certain: if you have a leak it will not get better without your help.
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  #5  
Old 05-19-2013, 10:14 AM
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Default hmmm... me too

Quote:
Originally Posted by lnoska View Post
I have been driving my 1960 Thunderbird a bit the last few weeks. My sweetheart commented the other day that there was a strong gasoline smell in the garage after I parked the car. The smell would go away after a bit. I have not driven the car in a week and there has been no gas smell. I am guessing I have a carburetor problem. I am thinking the float is out of adjustment.
Has anybody experienced this problem? Can anybody give me some guidance on where to look, and a possible solution to the problem?
Larry I have been experiencing similar of late with my '60. Have not had an opportunity yet to find the source, and I'm hoping that its not the fuel pump thing.
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  #6  
Old 05-19-2013, 08:24 PM
Richard D. Hord Richard D. Hord is offline
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WHAT EVER THE PROBLEM, YOU NEED TO FIND IT AS SOON AS POSSIBLE! Remember gas itself will not burn, its the vapors that burn and are highly explosive.
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  #7  
Old 05-19-2013, 08:54 PM
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Carb bowls "boiling" out from the engine heat?

Ethanol gas I think is more susceptible to this.

The next time you park it, pop the hood and remove the air cleaner. Look down into the carb.
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  #8  
Old 05-20-2013, 04:47 AM
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I think there was one member here that posted his fuel tank had rusted through on the top of the tank.

As suggested, I would start with the carb after shutdown.

Remove the air cleaner and watch for puddling in the intake manifold plenum and/or leakage at the throttle shafts onto the intake manifold. Then fuel pump, all lines (especially rubber) and finally the tank.

When replacing flexible fuel line(s), make sure you use fuel injected rated hose as it is impervious to the new fuel(s).
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  #9  
Old 05-20-2013, 09:04 PM
Astrowing Astrowing is offline
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A gas cap that doesn't vent properly can pressurize the system also. Above 8 psi, the float can not contain the pressure. Had this problem with my 61 F100 flooding carb into crankcase. Finally drilled a hole in the back of the gas cap and don't fill it very full. Everyone should not only check oil level every time, but also for smell of gas in the oil. We've gotten accustomed to not doing this with fuel injected modern engines
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  #10  
Old 05-21-2013, 01:50 AM
KULTULZ
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Astrowing View Post

Everyone should not only check oil level every time, but also for smell of gas in the oil. We've gotten accustomed to not doing this with fuel injected modern engines
Hmm...

Very good and forgotten point...
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