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  #11  
Old 05-06-2013, 08:57 PM
KULTULZ
 
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Using the thermostat is a no brainer.

An aluminum high flow WP to me depends on the application (and $$$). A HI-PO yes, something like you guys have is something else (to me). The stock WP should handle the job.

I am anal about OEM appearance on a car of this vintage.
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  #12  
Old 05-06-2013, 11:49 PM
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I've been using these for years on my Y-block because that engine has two exhaust ports smack in the middle of the head, right next to each other. FelPro even suggests drilling holes between these cylinders in the head and block for 'steam'.

Notice that FE engines have NO exhaust ports next to each other. That's no mistake. FE's are Ford's second attempt at building an overhead valve engine.

While the Y sounds like no other, it has issues with oiling and heat. ALL old engines suffer from cooling systems that aren't as efficient to some degree. I get a kick out of the hoops that people jump through, using six or seven blade fans, shrouds, special water pumps, several rows of rad cores (that block air more than they exchange heat), etc. The fact is, when our cars were new they had none of these 'work around' devices.

When I had my oem cu radiator out of the Galaxie I used heat and phosphoric acid (like CLR) to unplug the cores. I was amazed at how many were plugged. Head gasket rust holes are another concern. Use fresh name-brand antifreeze. - Dave
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  #13  
Old 05-07-2013, 07:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KULTULZ View Post

An aluminum high flow WP to me depends on the application (and $$$). A HI-PO yes, something like you guys have is something else (to me). The stock WP should handle the job.
Let me add that a high flow WP will increase coolant flow speed @ idle and slow road speed (say parades or city traffic).

But if were me and I had a low road speed problem, I would first consider upgrading to 60 BIRD AC basics to try and keep the OEM appearance.
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  #14  
Old 05-07-2013, 04:39 PM
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Thank you guys for all your valuable advice. One thing I noticed just today when started the cold engine was that the water was bubbling and splashing in the expansion tank even when it was still cold and so it was leaking out of the expansion tank quite heavily through the outlet hose. Need to mention that the fan belt is still loose (not tightened sofar) and the water level in the tank is about 1/3 from the top. Still not sure if the water ought to bubble and splash in the tank like that...???

I will exchange the fan belt tomorrow and see what it does and how it behaves after that.
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  #15  
Old 05-07-2013, 05:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ca58tbird View Post
Rock&Roll, my first guess is that your water pump is OK, at least if you don't have leakage out of the weap hole, and or the pump is not squealing. So what the other guys have advised is good advice. However if you do want to buy a new pump, perhaps you might want to check out Rockauto.com. They list a 59tbird 352 water pump for $67. You can check out their advertisement in the "Parts for Sale" catagory of this Squarebirds.org user forum and find Rock Auto's ad that gives 5% off.
Thanks for the tip! The price is about half opposite to the Mac's parts even though the RockAuto's pump is remanufactured. Should I go with the new one or the remanufactured? I have no idea what the difference could be...?
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  #16  
Old 05-07-2013, 05:33 PM
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Also what kind of fan shroud would you suggest and how does one improve cooling effectivity?
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  #17  
Old 05-07-2013, 05:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by simplyconnected View Post
It's even worse than that, John...
"High-flow thermostats from Milodon greatly aid the correct functioning of a high-performance cooling system. They're engineered to warm the engine to a proper operating temperature without making it run hot enough to lose power. Also, the "Balanced Sleeve" design equalizes the pressures exerted on the thermostat. This counters the undesired effect of increased flow from a high-volume water pump, which actually tends to hold a stat closed."
Summit price is $14.95. - Dave
Nice one! Searched for the proper type on Summit but did not find one for '59 Ford. Is it possible to use other type to substitute?
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  #18  
Old 05-07-2013, 05:42 PM
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I've always used the rebuilt water pumps and have not had any problem with them. With the rebuilt pumps you are pretty much assured of getting the correct housing. With a new pump being made overseas I have no idea how well it will fit.

John
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  #19  
Old 05-08-2013, 05:51 AM
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you said your water in the expansion tank was only 1/3 from the top. I do not believe you want it any higher than that and indeed may want it lower. Dave and others may want to comment.

As your engine heats all your coolant up, it will expand some. This will put more pressure on the tank , possibly causing leaks in time. Some of this depends on your cap being 13 or 7 psi rated, as well.

If there is a decent buffer of air in the tank, then it will compress, effectively absorbing that increase of coolant volume and making life easier for the tank. Air is much more compressible than liquid antifreeze/water.

As Dave and I have discussed, the old expansion tanks were a modest design and you do not want to cause them to leak by asking too much of them.

I am not sure what the intended or proper level of coolant in the tank is supposed to be but I am willing to be your are fine and might even consider a bit less. If you search thru enough threads in this Forum, you will find discussions of this.
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  #20  
Old 05-08-2013, 06:26 AM
KULTULZ
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnG View Post

As your engine heats all your coolant up, it will expand some. This will put more pressure on the tank , possibly causing leaks in time. Some of this depends on your cap being 13 or 7 psi rated, as well.

If there is a decent buffer of air in the tank, then it will compress, effectively absorbing that increase of coolant volume and making life easier for the tank. Air is much more compressible than liquid antifreeze/water.
As the coolant expands from absorbing engine heat, the trapped air at the top of the radiator tank/expansion tank will be (should be) expelled through the pressure cap. This will prevent air from being circulated throughout the system.

As the coolant contracts after shutdown and cooling, air will be drawn in from the outside through the pressure cap (pressure relieved).

Tank seam failures are common as they are subject to corrosion over the years from non-service of the cooling system. Quality repros are available.

This is why a pressure check of the system and cap is important during a yearly coolant system check.

ADDENDUM

Think of a coolant pressure cap as like the pressure relief valve on your house water heater.

Last edited by KULTULZ : 05-08-2013 at 09:12 AM. Reason: ADD INFO
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