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  #51  
Old 05-20-2012, 09:47 AM
Charles Nix Charles Nix is offline
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Default Radiator - Recore Radiator vs Replacement

Does anyone have an idea which costs more or which way is the best way to go? Thanks.
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  #52  
Old 05-20-2012, 03:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles Nix View Post

Does anyone have an idea which costs more or which way is the best way to go? Thanks.
Either way is acceptable, but the trans oil cooler is in one tank so I personally would want a complete assembly. But you have to be careful here as most replacements are now poor quality off-shore. If there is a not a specific BIRD vendor offering a direct OEM replacement, I would research MODINE.
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  #53  
Old 05-20-2012, 05:19 PM
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simplyconnected simplyconnected is offline
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Original radiators are made of copper and brass. They transfer heat MUCH easier than aluminum and they are easy to recore. Recoring aluminum requires TIG skills.

If you buy a new one, beware... more rows of core obstructs air flow which requires a stronger fan to push air through. - Dave
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  #54  
Old 05-28-2012, 05:13 PM
ayrwoof ayrwoof is offline
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ayrwoof
Talking bon ami/ commet

[QUOTE i hosed my block and had the rad cleaned , next i poured in
water and half can of bon ami scouring powder. drove it one day then dumped the lower hose , (put in a freash wire ) so it dont colapse.
also with the weight of our fords . i bent up some 2 1/4 " head and
exhaust pipes. Nothing says get rid of heat like one size bigger pipe.
two and one half " is overkill. most everything else was covered
im certain.
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  #55  
Old 05-28-2012, 06:50 PM
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simplyconnected simplyconnected is offline
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ayrwoof, I understand your intent, but keep scouring powders far away from your cooling system (yes, even Bon Ami). They are abrasive to the water pump seals and they really don't do much good on lime deposits.

Tell us what came out of your block when using the hose. That had to be a tremendous help if you took the core plugs out.

Antifreeze contains a rubber lubricant and phosphoric acid in a very mild concentration. That's also the active ingredient in CLR (calcium, lime, rust). I'm not promoting CLR, but you really need the phosphoric acid to disolve lime buildup. I have found phosphoric acid in different products, available at some of the big stores. Crud Cutter has a product called, Must for Rust. It's about $8 per quart, but it works real well on radiators and heater cores without affecting the solder or brass. Some of the alloy wheel cleaners also contain phosphoric acid. Try to beat that price, too.

So, flush your system as soon as possible to get rid of the abrasive. Most acids work much faster when heated. I remove the radiator and use a cheap drill motor pump to circulate the acid in a tub, (heated with a Coleman camp stove). In the first half hour, you will see LOADS of crap in the tub that came out of your rad. Reverse the flow, and cycle it every two hours or so.

For the heater core, I usually keep it in place and just extend the two hoses with the tub and pump setup. - Dave
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