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  #1  
Old 04-07-2012, 06:34 PM
NewBird13 NewBird13 is offline
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Default Which front end kit?

Hey guys
With so many different front end suspension kits out there which is the best to go with? I keep seeing ones pop up on ebay for a couple of hundred bucks, Im assuming these are probably foreign made garbage but someone correct me if I am wrong.
So what kits have people used in the past that they are happy with?
Thanks
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  #2  
Old 04-07-2012, 07:10 PM
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Dakota Boy Dakota Boy is offline
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Kanter.

avoid eBay.
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  #3  
Old 04-08-2012, 12:55 AM
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Whoever you buy from, ASK THEM if their bushings are from India or the orient. Urethane from the USA (OEM stuff) is the best.

If the salesperson says they don't know, the parts ARE inferior. Also, avoid buying parts you don't need. Some kits include upper pivot shafts that rarely ever go bad. Just be a wise shopper and ask lots of questions.

Be SURE you follow the Service Manual's instructions for tightening when the car is on level ground. - Dave
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Old 04-08-2012, 03:07 PM
Yellowbird Yellowbird is offline
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I went with Kanter also. Be sure to check that the kit is complete. I believe that the inner and outer tie rod ends were not included. They had helpful sales people.

Dave is right. Go with torque information from the manual and do the final tightening with the car on the ground so the load is on the front end.

Good luck with the project!

Leonard
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  #5  
Old 04-09-2012, 02:59 PM
NewBird13 NewBird13 is offline
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Once again the information you guys have provided is awesome. Thanks
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  #6  
Old 04-12-2012, 09:58 PM
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I got the Kanter kit with the shafts and was glad I did. My old shafts were rusty and scored. They might have been fine (actually, I think I ended up sending them to someone here), but they didn't look good and I was glad to have replacements.

You can check out my rebuild gallery here.
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  #7  
Old 04-12-2012, 11:28 PM
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I love Doug's pictures and he does great work.

You should take pictures, too. Lots of them. It's a pain to stop what you're doing and pick up a camera with Doug's greasy hands, but well worth it later on (for us).

99% of every restoration is cleaning/de-rusting/painting. Take your time and do it right. When I stripped the rust off my "A" arms with hydrochloric acid, I did it in a kiddie pool I borrowed from the dogs. After they were painted and the bushings installed, they looked brand new.

Another trick I use is, mark everything. You may not need to but my '55 upper arm shafts come with one side longer than the other. Before disassembly, I stamped the upper front with "R" or "L". Little helps like this really help with assembly.

Some of my bushing sleeves were rusted in. I used a little heat. The urethane melts out then the shells come out much easier. Pounding new bushings in is easier with a 1-1/4" pipe nipple and a good heavy hammer.

None of this work is for the faint-hearted. Suspension work is bull work and it requires big tools. When you are ready to mount the lower arms, install the rear bolts first (snug but not tight) and fill the gap in the front with shims before you bolt the front side. This is how the factory did it.

None of your bushings pivot on the shafts. Each have inner and outer sleeves with urethane in between. You will notice teeth on the ends of the inner sleeves, (so they don't turn when tightened). I greased my bolts before assembly, just to inhibit future rust. Hope this helps and good luck with your new suspension. It sure makes a big difference when done, especially if you also replace your old springs. - Dave
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Last edited by simplyconnected : 04-12-2012 at 11:30 PM.
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