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  #11  
Old 02-01-2012, 08:12 PM
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Yikes.

Sounds like a rats' nest has been uncovered.

I have a blower motor and housing from a non-A/C car.
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  #12  
Old 02-02-2012, 03:16 PM
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Strangely enough, but I have something called " Squarebird Illustrated Parts Catalogue" and the drawing there ( looks like old Ford original illustrations ) shows the blower motor with only 2 wires. And that illustration is shows the whole AC configuration

Last hope goes to SimplyConnected....
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  #13  
Old 02-02-2012, 03:50 PM
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Attached is a section of the wiring diagram I have for a '59, with or without AC.

FWIW, my blower had a single speed until one day I looked at the wiring and found that the red and orange wires had been connected to the blower motor through a four way connector - two red and two orange wires. I then seperated them into two seperate circuits and now I have a two speed blower. What the diagram doesn't show is the resistor block on the bottom of the plenum. Curiosity got the best of me so I had a look at how mine is wired. As expected, the red wire goes from the switch to the resistor in the plenum and then to the blower motor - low voltage, low speed. The orange wire goes directly to the blower motor - high voltage, high speed.
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File Type: jpg blower motor wiring.jpg (93.0 KB, 70 views)
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Last edited by Howard Prout : 02-02-2012 at 07:03 PM. Reason: revision after having a peek
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  #14  
Old 02-02-2012, 04:06 PM
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My 6-volt Customline has a two-speed motor with three wires. One is short and grounds to the starter solenoid mounting bolt.

That means it has two separate windings inside the motor, one for HI, one for LO. These motors are rare.

My '59 also has a similar setup but for 12-volts. Again, rare.

I saw the diagrams and wondered how many folks would see them as a contradiction. No, they are absolutely correct (for each application). On the Fan Switch; H=HI, L=LO, B=Battery.


In 1960, Ford started using resistors on fan motors. That way, (cheaper) motors only need one winding. But, where do you put the resistor? When we were young and dumb, we put it just below the fan duct in the engine bay. Today we put it INSIDE the duct, that way the resistors can be smaller, they cannot get too hot because air is constantly blowing, and they should last longer. Today, we tap two resistors in series; LO, MED, (and HI gets the full 12-volts with no resistor).

If you look for a fan motor today, they usually have only two wires. Really, that's all you need to get one, two, or three speeds using a resistor.

Consider the following drawing (typical of early Ford blower motors). The A/C couldn't care less if the fan motor is on or not because it gets control from the (separate) thermostatic switch. (To call it 'A/C Blower Switch' is wrong. This is your fan switch.)

Also note, this motor has three wires, one is a ground. The dash switch either energizes Red (which energizes the top field winding) or Orange (which energizes the bottom Field winding). Both fields have different numbers of turns which produce more/less magnetism for different speeds. - Dave

Sorry Howard, I didn't see your post before I put mine up. You're absolutely correct (as usual). - Dave
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Last edited by simplyconnected : 02-02-2012 at 04:15 PM.
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  #15  
Old 02-02-2012, 05:33 PM
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Interesting stuff here. I'd like to have my Low fan speed working too.

Now for the $100 question: Where can we get one of these resistors to put in-line on the red wire?
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  #16  
Old 02-02-2012, 07:01 PM
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Provided your heater motor is two-wire:
Junk yards throw them out, daily. Every car in every brand uses them. They have the kind that bolts on and enters into the heater duct with three electrical stabs:
1. to - Motor
2. from switch - MED speed
3. from switch - LO speed

If your switch only has HI and LO, just hook up two stabs (1&3).

Remember, HI speed is a direct 12-volts from the switch (HI).

You can send the hundred bucks directly to me, since I saved you all that money. - Dave
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  #17  
Old 02-02-2012, 08:10 PM
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A clarification of my previous post above: All A/C units I have parted out had a large diameter fan motor but only TWO wires, an orange and a ground. The non A/C cars of course have the red, orange and black (ground) wires and the fan motor diameter is about 3/4 the size of the A/C motor. The A/C setup still has the red and orange wires in the harness but they come together in the 4 way connector Howard speaks of. The two wires exit to the one orange wire on the motor. The fan speeds are regulated by the resistor in the fan chamber on the A/C cars.
I have seen the smaller motors with three wires used on A/C cars. They fit, the shaft diameter is the same as are the mounting provisions.
I'm not sure what fan speeds are available if one wire runs thru the resistor when using the 3 wire motor. Anyone?
Carl
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  #18  
Old 02-03-2012, 03:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by partsetal View Post
A clarification of my previous post above: All A/C units I have parted out had a large diameter fan motor but only TWO wires, an orange and a ground. The non A/C cars of course have the red, orange and black (ground) wires and the fan motor diameter is about 3/4 the size of the A/C motor. The A/C setup still has the red and orange wires in the harness but they come together in the 4 way connector Howard speaks of. The two wires exit to the one orange wire on the motor. The fan speeds are regulated by the resistor in the fan chamber on the A/C cars.
I have seen the smaller motors with three wires used on A/C cars. They fit, the shaft diameter is the same as are the mounting provisions.
I'm not sure what fan speeds are available if one wire runs thru the resistor when using the 3 wire motor. Anyone?
Carl
@ Carl: I like this answer, as it means Im OK again

Im 100% sure Howard and simplyconnected is right, but I got a bit lost to be honest...
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  #19  
Old 02-03-2012, 07:15 PM
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Sorry Anders, my last post was an answer to Dakotaboy's question about where to find a resistor.
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  #20  
Old 02-03-2012, 07:19 PM
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I think Carl has the best explanation. My car didn't have AC originally - I added it. That was too many years ago to remember the details. My guess is that I didn't change the blower motor - just used the original, which is why I have a three wire motor in an AC car.
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