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  #11  
Old 03-05-2011, 01:50 PM
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Maybe we can collectively Reverse Engineer the length of this spacer (Item 5540).

Has the bolt been replaced from the original one? My assumption is that the bolt has a larger diameter shank than the threaded portion of the bolt.

Look at the attached diagram and see if my conclusions make sense when looking at the suspension assembly of your car. I think washer 55596 seats against the shank of bolt *45859-S, this keeps anyone from over-compressing the bushings. If that is true, than the length of your spacer 5540 is fractional shorter than the lenght of bolt *45859-S MINUS the thickness of the Axle Perch (part of 4010 axle housing), but long enough to retain the compressed thickness of bushings 5537. Also if washer 55596 or the bolt have been replaced by something different, that could change this connection from the way it should function. Looks like your bolt is different than my conclusion. I have a hardware catalog that I can check later this evening to see if the bolt is unique.

If your bolt is the original design, than the lenght of the spacer would be fractionally smaller than the bolt shank lenght MINUS(-) the spring perch thickness MINUS(-) washer 55596 thickness. This would assume that your nut would be run up to the ends of the bolt threads.

It appears the purpose of the spacer and bushings is to allow this connection to move side-to-side as well as up and down for suspension travel.

Maybe someone else has some ideas after reading this.

Added an additional sketch for clarity.
Attached Images
File Type: pdf DOC001.PDF (74.8 KB, 52 views)
File Type: pdf SKETCH.PDF (17.5 KB, 31 views)
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Last edited by GTE427 : 03-05-2011 at 02:19 PM.
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  #12  
Old 03-05-2011, 03:01 PM
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Ken, you're good so far. Use the TEXT Catalog for the component dimensions. The 'standard of measure' on this car is in 'inches'. The bolt is 4-1/2" long and 5/8" diameter with 18-threads per inch. The rubber parts are 3"-total thickness. The bolt probably had no more than 1/2" of threads hanging passed the nut when properly installed:
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File Type: jpg 1958TbirdSuspensionBolt.JPG (83.0 KB, 126 views)
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  #13  
Old 03-05-2011, 03:17 PM
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Dave,
I didn't see the bolt specifications when i looked at the Text Catalog, thanks. Do you have a Standard and Utility catalog, what copyright?

I did look at the text for spacer 5540, no lenght was given
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Last edited by GTE427 : 03-05-2011 at 03:22 PM.
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  #14  
Old 03-05-2011, 03:36 PM
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Ford Group Numbers are kinda 'fuzzy' at best. Notice there is nothing about the bolt if you look for 5859, but it's there if you look for the whole assembly. In fact, there are three applications for the same bolt and nut in that assembly.

I marvel when I think of the scheme Ford used waaaaaay back before we had computers... and we're still using it today.
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Old 03-05-2011, 04:53 PM
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Before Carl helped me getting a set of used, but original Isolators and washer( 55596 ) I was long gone in making this work. As the parts I have now, the total length of the two isolators ( 5537 ) is longer than my sleeve. Having in mind that the sleeve also runs through the lower trailing arm and the isolators are on one side of it, it add little more "air". Now, I dont know if this is the right length of the sleeve or not. I just dont think its the right one as it is yellowish, as modern treaten metal parts.
I am 99,99% sure my bolt is original though. It is the very same Ford split-lock-nut and the bolt look just like the others, but with its own length as the rest in the rear suspension.
Why I am trying to figure out the right length is that it is a important input about how much the isolators should be able to compress. Bringing some more experianced friends having a look at this last Friday, we tryed every possible way to check every movement with and without attaching the coil springs, as we then could move the rear axle, and our conclusion was that the isolators most probably was way softer in 1958 than they have become since then But still.
So if I only get hold of the "original length" of the sleeve, I can start chasing different shore of rubber to start trying what might work best.
So far guys, Im VERY greatful to your help and support! Especially as you seems to have 59s & 60s yourself. Where is the 58 Nation?....
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Last edited by Anders : 03-05-2011 at 05:02 PM.
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Old 03-05-2011, 05:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by frank58 View Post
This one?


Frank: Are these isolators soft? Can you squeeze them with your hand? I looked them up at Rare Parts, but they dont mension anything regarding shore.
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Old 03-05-2011, 05:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anders View Post
...Im VERY greatful to your help and support! Especially as you seems to have 59s & 60s yourself. Where is the 58 Nation?...
Anders, my only Thunderbird sits ontop a trophy. (Thank You very much.)

But allow me to draw your attention to this part number again:

It indicates THREE of your bolts are the exact same part number on each side. Ken's attached picture verifies their exact locations. So, all SIX bolts (three on each side) are interchangeable unless someone has changed all six bolts. - Dave
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Old 03-05-2011, 05:36 PM
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Anders,

Realising that the bolt is used in three places and from your conversation, I'd agree that the bolt is nothing special and original. That your spacer is shorter than the combined length of the bushings would indicate that the suspension travel shouldn't bind unless the spacer is still too long once it's compressed and carrying a load. I drew a scaled cross section with a 2.5" long spacer as found in the photos and the 1" and 2" bushing without being compressed. Probably of no help, it's attached just in case. Was hoping to help you solve this without having an original piece to measure. Good Luck!
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Old 03-05-2011, 06:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GTE427 View Post
Anders,

Realising that the bolt is used in three places and from your conversation, I'd agree that the bolt is nothing special and original. That your spacer is shorter than the combined length of the bushings would indicate that the suspension travel shouldn't bind unless the spacer is still too long once it's compressed and carrying a load. I drew a scaled cross section with a 2.5" long spacer as found in the photos and the 1" and 2" bushing without being compressed. Probably of no help, it's attached just in case. Was hoping to help you solve this without having an original piece to measure. Good Luck!
Yes, this is exactly as it looks. My sleeve, or spacer, is 70 mm, and that is 2, 75 inch, so if 2,5 is the right length, I need to cut mine, and that does make some sence, as the isolators will be able to compress more before the sleeve/spacer will "stop" the movement.
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Old 03-05-2011, 06:39 PM
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I've been following along but staying out of this because I don't have any first have knowledge of the 58 rear suspension. After looking at the pictures and Ken's drawings there's one thing I think I can conclude. When those bushings, or 'isolators' are used with a center sleeve, the nut is tightened all the way and torqued to keep it from backing off, there are no 'voids'. the isolators will allow movement when the weight of the car forces them to move, those arms should be HARD to move around by hand. We now know the sizes of the isolators and the bolt. the isolators must get squeezed somewhat to do their job. some pictures of the axle and lower arms/brackets would help me visualize the set up. That's my idea anyway, good luck, Bob C
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