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  #11  
Old 02-16-2011, 02:34 PM
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Great sequential photos and instructions etc.

Keep 'em coming!
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  #12  
Old 02-16-2011, 02:46 PM
60 T-Bird 60 T-Bird is offline
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I'm sorry I wasn't clean about the rivet thing. When I first started to rebuild these, I found out the hard way that the shafts need to be spotless and turn freely and the shafts should be lubed with penetration oil to aid in drifting the shaft loose. In a later picture you will see a broken retaining spring disc with an "opps" beside it. You see, if the shaft drags through the bearing, binding on it, it will snap the spring clip in two. Therefore, I had to drill the rivits in only that one to repair my screw-up. Live and learn. Being a Machinist and a cheapskate, I made my own rivits and stole a clip from a dead motor partsal sent me. Thanx for the question and you r car inspires me and therefore "Angelina".

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dakota Boy View Post
I would've never understood this without the photos. Thanks---

It doesnt look like too tough of a task now.

Questions: The "bearing retainer" that was riveted...... I'm not following what exactly was done there. Drill out some rivets somewhere, then pop-rivet them back in place later? And where was that round piece that got snapped in two?
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  #13  
Old 02-16-2011, 02:48 PM
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In order to rotate the drive shaft, the studs are in the way of turning it on the scotchbrite wheel. The studs hold the halves together, so they should be removed. Hope this helps.

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Originally Posted by GTE427 View Post
Martin,

On the drive end of the motor, you removed the two studs early on. Could you explain the reason why that step was neccessary. From the photo and tutorial this wasn't clear to me. Thanks.
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  #14  
Old 02-16-2011, 02:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by partsetal View Post
Martin,
Do you use a growler to check the integrity of the armature?
Carl
I do not. Not something I used since when I worked in a Harley shop. So, my method of testing (because they go together so quickly) is when I power them up and try to stop them with my index finger and thumb, the rotating shaft burns my fingers before it stops the motor...Therefore good to go...You're probably laughing and shaking your head reading this...Martin
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  #15  
Old 08-03-2013, 12:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 60 T-Bird View Post
I do not. Not something I used since when I worked in a Harley shop. So, my method of testing (because they go together so quickly) is when I power them up and try to stop them with my index finger and thumb, the rotating shaft burns my fingers before it stops the motor...Therefore good to go...You're probably laughing and shaking your head reading this...Martin
Sorry I have been away from the forum so long. I am traveling by sailboat these days.
I wanted to add that these motors are also the same as the power seats.
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  #16  
Old 08-03-2013, 02:42 AM
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Default Rebuilding window motors from a 60

Martin, welcome back! I hope your sailing is going well for you!
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  #17  
Old 08-03-2013, 10:25 AM
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Martin has done a great job in showing how to rebuild these motors which are very similar to all the little motors used over many years and locations.

I would like to add: IF you have a motor that runs but is running slowly there is a good chance it only needs to have the bushings oiled. The exposed shaft end is easy to work oil into - just add a drop. The enclosed end of the motor is not accessable unless it is disassembled. I have had good luck just drilling a small hole in the center of the motor's rear housing and adding a drop or two of oil via a pin oiler. Don't over do it but give the oil a chance to seep into the bushing. Moving the shaft for and aft as well as rotating it helps to work the oil into the bushing. A bit of sealer of your choice can close the hole you drilled.

Nothing is better than a complete cleaning and rebuild & I realize this is not the "correct" way to fix a problem but it might get a window or fan motor running smother and quieter without a tear down.
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  #18  
Old 08-03-2013, 02:05 PM
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Wonderful series on repairing window/p/s motors. I'm sure this will save me from breaking parts and being frustrated later. How are you cleaning the armatures and stator? They come out looking brand new. Also, have you ever found a source for the washers used as shims inside the motors. Every once in a while some of these will come out broken.
Thanks again for the great post in TRL.
Nyles
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  #19  
Old 02-03-2014, 08:06 PM
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I'm going to try this procedure with one of my rear quarter window motors this weekend. The motors are VERY weak.

Wish me luck...

I will also be sure the motor has a good "ground" while I'm at it.
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  #20  
Old 02-04-2014, 12:09 AM
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Use contact cleaner and plenty of rags.
Do not sand the commutator segments. Brushes 'form' the copper by impregnating carbon into the surface. That lubricates the brushes and keeps them from wearing.

The only time we dress commutator segments is when they glaze from excessive grease & dirt deposits, or if they deform into 'cup', taper or egg shapes. These are extreme cases.

Scrape in between the copper segments so they are undercut, make sure the brushes slide freely and you're ready to go.
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