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  #191  
Old 10-23-2018, 06:36 PM
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I've done many of them and I've never used any measurements. I go by the picture in the manual for the longer bushing. The shorter bushing is centered in the arm.

John
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  #192  
Old 10-24-2018, 04:17 AM
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Sorry John
I was talking about the bushings on the Upper and lower arms.
Question being about the 2 bushings on the lower arm.
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  #193  
Old 10-24-2018, 12:18 PM
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Eric,

I should've read the question more thoroughly. As for the lower arms I suggest you do a search. There have been many threads that deal with the replacement of lower arm bushings. I'm sure some have had pictures that should help you out.

John
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  #194  
Old 10-24-2018, 02:28 PM
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The illustration shows (front 3054) shims for the lower arm ONLY. That is because after you assemble your lower control arm and bushings, the assembly is butted-to the #2 crossmember and shims take up any remaining space in the FRONT. So in other words, everything is referenced from the #2 crossmember (that the engine mounts are welded to).

As John said, no measurements are necessary. The lower control arm shims are simply made of mild steel if you should need more. Older models had square shims but modern models used round. It doesn't matter, they're just shims. I think they are 1/16" (~1.5mm) thick. When the bolts are tightened, any remaining 'stretch' will be equalized between both bushings so take out as much gap as possible but don't be precise. (Think in terms of the production assembler. He gets one minute per car.)

After you seat your lower control arm bushings TO THE SHOULDER STOPS, the car body bolts and shims hold the inner bushing sleeves solid (so they can not rotate or move). If you didn't find or see your lower shims, they might be stuck to the body (actually to the #1 crossmember) where the large 7/8" bolt fits through.

It's important you DO NOT TIGHTEN any suspension bolts until the car is on its wheels. I would give it a bounce or two first, then tighten them. If you tighten whilst the wheels are hanging, you will hyperextend the urethane and break it inside the bushings.

Upper Control Arms don't get shims on the bushings. Those bushings butt against the pivot shaft on the inner sides and bolts with large washers tighten the outer sides to the pivot shaft. If there is any difference between old and new bushings, the FRAME SHIMS (3043) will compensate.

After the car is sitting at the usual stance and the bolts are tightened, it's ready for a front end alignment. - Dave

EDIT: Examine both of these bushings:


This is a 1955-1960 lower bushing. Notice it does have many protrusions that ARE a shoulder stop. (They also prevent the outer shell from rotating.)


Here is a 1958-60 upper bushing. It also has a shoulder stop but it looks slightly different.

Now, notice that both bushings have TEETH on the ends of the inner sleeves. This is to prevent them from turning. All rotation is done with urethane so the bolts should never show signs of wear.
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Last edited by simplyconnected : 10-24-2018 at 04:28 PM.
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  #195  
Old 10-24-2018, 05:43 PM
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Thank you
I was reading some older posts you made about front suspension but did not find the reply.
I also went back to the manual and found what confused me.
They said to install the arm and shims as needed to remove any fore and aft movement.
That is where I understood re-install the shims you removed before.
That is different. Now I got it (at last).

I also well noted (and John already gave a word about it) that the final tightening must be made on the wheels.
From what I can remember I have well the same bushing as on your picture, (car is a 60.)

Hopefully I can make some progress on saturday.

Eric
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  #196  
Old 10-24-2018, 06:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eric S View Post
...They said to install the arm and shims as needed to remove any fore and aft movement.
That is where I understood re-install the shims you removed before...
Glad you're straight, now. It stands to reason that not every bushing is identical so there must be some provision for compensation. There is. That's where the shims come in. You many need to take one out or add one because you are removing one set and adding another. This is not a case where the original shims are exactly right for your new installation. The very last thing you want is sloppy bushings after they are tight. Take care of this NOW, before your spring is replaced. Use a long prybar to shove the lower control arm towards the rear as you add your shims to the front.

BTW, all Squarebirds have the same suspension (with identical part numbers) so the picture is good for all years. - Dave
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  #197  
Old 10-25-2018, 07:18 AM
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2 points I still need to make clear :

1.
Anyone can remind me how/where to install this "washer" that goes on the end of the steering power cylinder. Being too small, it do not "cap" the nut. (replacement parts on top, originals on bottom)

2.
I made a drawing where I hope I pointed the right values to the rights nuts.
However I still have the following which I can not locate :
Idler Arm to Bracket and Rod Nuts 50-60 FtLbs
Idler Arm Bushing to Idler Arm Rod Bolt 85-100 FtLbs
Idler Arm Bushing to Idler Arm Bracket Bolt 85-100 FtLbs

I would say the 1st one might be the nuts on top of Idler Arm (where I initially used 85-100 value on the drawing) ?
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  #198  
Old 10-25-2018, 12:25 PM
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I never use a torque wrench on the idler arm bolts because of the castle nut. As long as the slot in the nut lines up with the hole in the arm and the cotter pin goes in easy it's tight enough. As for the bolts that hold the bracket to the frame 25-30 lbs is correct. When it comes to rebuilding engines and suspension bolts I always use the torque specs. When it comes to most other things I go by feel.

John
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  #199  
Old 10-29-2018, 02:14 PM
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Dave

do I understood well that both uper and lower bushings need to be pushed all the way until the shoulder (ie larger diameter ring) comes into contact with the arm?
Especially on the upper arm bushings, I do not stop at the first shoulder (ie slightly larger diameter on the bushing body)?
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  #200  
Old 10-30-2018, 01:42 AM
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Eric, this will make better sense when you assemble the pivot shaft. Good pictures of the original setup will reveal an air gap between the control arm and the bushing flanges. These bushings do NOT seat all the way to the flange. They stop at the 'step' because the step (or shoulder) is too large to fit inside the control arm hole.

When you insert new bushings in the upper control arm, the pivot shaft must be inserted FIRST, so it is trapped between both bushings. You will see that the bushings will stop on the pivot shaft before the outer shell flanges go too far. I normally start the first bushing, insert the shaft, start the opposite bushing, then I alternate as I drive the bushings in. Then, it will make sense to you.

(My 1955 Ford has pivot shafts that are longer in front than in the rear, measured from the frame bolt holes. I stamp them (front-top RH, front-top LH) before removing so I assemble correctly. I believe your pivot shafts are equal and hard to get wrong.)

These bushings should be rather hard to remove and hard to insert into the control arm holes. Again, the bushing's outer shell should be solid to the arm and the inner shell (surrounding the bolt) should be solid so it does not turn when tightened. All rotation is done within the urethane. That makes the car 'float' on urethane.

When I remove an old bushing, I heat the rubber with a propane torch and let the inner shell 'melt' out. Do this outside. What remains is a bare outer shell in the control arm. To remove that, I carefully saw the sheet metal shell from inside the hole with a hacksaw blade. Be careful not to saw the control arm. The saw cut relieves tension which allows me to collapse the shell, folding it inside the hole. Hope this is clear. I have a press but I no longer use it for control arm bushings because it isn't needed. - Dave
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