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  #71  
Old 06-28-2018, 09:52 PM
pbf777 pbf777 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by simplyconnected View Post
Scott, it can't be brittle and soft at the same time. That is impossible. - Dave
O.K. ............Lets say, there are two really big rock boulders in front of you, one is made-up of granite, the other of sandstone; someone hands you a five pound hammer, and challenges you to a race as to whom can reduce their assigned boulder to a pile of rubble first; do you pick the granite boulder because it's harder and therefore will break-up easier, than the accepted, softer sandstone, or........? Hum........

Now, we've really strayed off course, sorry! I promise, I won't do it again, I promise!

Scott
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  #72  
Old 06-28-2018, 10:52 PM
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Alright Scott, school is in.
Hard means brittle. <--take this to the bank.
Glass is hard, rocks are hard, cast iron is hard. They will break before bending very much.

Steel is made from iron but it has other alloys that make it 'soft' and bendable. Different alloys also make steel 'tough', not hard, not soft. Drill rod and piano wire are tough, so is spring steel, and machine steel. Die steel is hard. It chips and breaks. If you chip a hammer, the steel is too hard.

Mild steel, like a grade-3 bolt simply bends or stretches. Grad-8 bolts are heat treated and case hardened. So now we have a bolt that is tough inside and HARDER on the outside. It will not stretch nearly as much as a grade-3 but it will withstand far more tensile or impact force before it snaps (half in two as they said at work).

Metallurgy is a science that requires the understanding of grain structures, martensite in alloys of nickels and titaniums and austenite crystals that form in the heat treat process. Cast iron, by definition, is 2% carbon with very little grain structure. It is porous and very hard but it also machines easily and requires little or no lubricant.

Your rock examples are both hard but one is more dense and the other is more porous. Did you ever set a wine glass on top of a polished granite countertop? If you don't wipe the 'ring' off the bottom, red wine will seep into the granite and stain forever. Granite is hard but porous. Sandstone is even more porous.

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  #73  
Old 06-29-2018, 11:33 AM
pbf777 pbf777 is offline
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OH,............ BOY.




I know,............I promised!



Scott.
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  #74  
Old 06-30-2018, 12:04 PM
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Cool

Thank you
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  #75  
Old 09-18-2018, 09:48 AM
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Default Update and interesting info

So i now have a freshly rebuilt 390 assembled with my edelbrock performer intake that i ported. I am going to drop the exhaust manifolds off at the shop so that i can get them machined. i also purchased a new stock exhaust kit off ebay. looks pretty solid. i tried welding on the old pipe and on the lowest setting it just burned a hole through it. I plan on installing some O2 sensors to go with my air fuel gauge so i can monitor the ratio. One concern is when i go to break in the new cam that my edelbrock 600cfm carb may be too lean since i am going from a 352 to a 397ci. also i am planning on either getting my com trans rebuilt or swapping to a C6. i have gotten quoted $600 to $1200 for the rebuild and i have seen that i could get a c6 that is supposed to be fine for about $450. so just weighing the options out. I already have the flexplate and the started needed for the C6

So i figured out what i did so wrong when installing the cam on my past engine....... So there is a c shaped spacer that goes between the front of the cam and the timing gear on older timing sets. This spacer is fabricated into newer timing sets like the comp cams double roller i installed. Sooooooo very bad things happen when you install the spacer behind a timing gear that already has it built in.

This explains why the bearing when to crap. and why i was hearing the noise at the front of the engine. And is very likely why the camshaft shifted inside the block.

Well you live and you learn. I always say that you can be smart or wise, but gaining wisdom gets expensive lol

Anyways.
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  #76  
Old 09-18-2018, 01:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StealthSRT10 View Post
One concern is when i go to break in the new cam that my edelbrock 600cfm carb may be too lean since i am going from a 352 to a 397ci.
Your concern as you have presented is not valid, as solely this engine capacity change is not so great as to be beyond the capability of this carburetor to compensate.

The real issue affecting the fuel delivery would be "signal", or the perceived pressure differential presented at the metering restrictions within the carburetor. The first assumption that if the capacity of the engine increases so will the requirement for proper fuel delivery seems appropriate, but by the same token since the throttle restriction remains constant then the "signal" or drafting of fuel will also increase.

The difficulty is when one changes other components, such as the camshaft to something more aggressive, then even though the engines' capacity may have increased, the signal is perhaps reduced to the carburetor, and ones' belief is that a larger jetting value is required because of the perceived increased air flow, but actually the larger jet is required because of the reduced signal, particularly at low speed.

But note that tuning efforts, which are unique to each instance, are generally required if one wishes to reap the best possible performance, as is responsible by the carburetor.

Scott.
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  #77  
Old 11-05-2018, 10:42 AM
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Well i finally got the rebuilt engine back into the car. So hopefully over the next few weeks i can get all the little things back together.
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