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  #1  
Old 03-02-2012, 10:39 AM
Astrowing Astrowing is online now
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Default Mechanical fuel pump leaks

By design, I think if a diaphram on a fuel pump fails, that the leaking fuel should spill externally through the vent holes of the pump. Is there anything to look for that would cause fuel to go into the crankcase instead? Or is it not surprising that you'll get fuel in the oil when a pump fails in any case?
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Old 03-02-2012, 11:08 AM
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I've had far too many old cars with gas in the oil to think it's a coincidence. It must be common for fuel pumps to leak through the shaft opening into the crankcase.

Last edited by jopizz : 03-02-2012 at 11:10 AM.
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Old 03-02-2012, 11:23 AM
Joe Johnston Joe Johnston is offline
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Depending on the cause or location of the leak, there is nothing to stop the gas from entering the engine through the hole in the side of the block where the pump arm goes through. Old school mechanics would always feel and smell the oil on the dipstick when checking the oil even though such a failure is rare but does happen.

I "think"* the supercharged Y-Block engines had a gasket or bellows type of seal that went around their modified fuel pump's arm but no others that I am aware of.

*(getin old and don't remember everything like I used to!)
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Old 03-02-2012, 11:33 AM
Richard D. Hord Richard D. Hord is offline
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Hey Guys,
You may think I'm crazy Went with a friend of mine several years ago to look at a small truck. The dealer had the truck backed up a small hill. I was checking things out and we raised the hood. For some reason I pulled the dip stick to check the oil. It showed it was right at full. I thought thats odd. So I felt of the oil and it just did not feel right. I smelled the oil and it did not smell right. I tasted the oil and could taste gas in the oil We told the dealer. He chased it down to a bad mechanical fuel pump! I told my friend I would be leery about buying the truck, because you don't know how long its been ran that way!
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Old 03-02-2012, 02:11 PM
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My 59 had that problem when I bought her. Lots of gas in the oil. I put in a new fuel pump, but I think the damage was done already since the strong running engine has a slight knock at anything over 2500 rpm or under load. That is why I am putting in the 390.
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Old 03-02-2012, 07:42 PM
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Had to put bearings in a 76 LTD 400 because of a bad fuel pump. It had 21000 miles on it. Made me sick
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Old 03-03-2012, 09:14 PM
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You guys all make a case for either having an electric pump, or a mechanical pump rebuilt with materials compatible with today's gasoline. Too much risk involved!

Richard: there is an old Cheech and Chong story that parallels yours but is not about gasoline that I should tell you by email sometime . . . believe it was about a dogsled team in Russia.

John
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Old 03-03-2012, 10:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnG View Post
You guys all make a case for either having an electric pump, or a mechanical pump rebuilt with materials compatible with today's gasoline. Too much risk involved!...
Hmmm... 30 dollar fuel pump or $6,000 overhaul... I just can't decide...

John, I'm in favor of the electric pump. All modern cars have one so we're used to their dependability by now. No such thing as a 'dry' fuel system, cranking forever, trying to get gas up to the carb. It happens as soon as the key is turned. But a word of caution to all: If you go with an electric pump, also install the inertia switch. All our modern cars have one, in case of an accident they shut off power to the pump. RESET, is that little white button usually located in your trunk. Junk yards crush these switches daily because nobody ever buys replacements.
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Old 03-04-2012, 12:44 PM
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similar comments hold with regard to some contemporary cars and intake manifolds. If you lose the ability to seal the coolant, it goes into the motor and oil and you soon ruin your bearings. This happened to one manufacturer in two areas: intake manifold gasket, and plenum.

Ya gotta protect that motor!!

John
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Old 03-04-2012, 06:57 PM
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A couple of options for fuel shut off on electric pumps that could be considered.

http://www.amazon.com/Holley-12-810-...0901273&sr=8-1

http://www.napaonline.com/Catalog/Re...&Dk=1&Dp=3&N=0

And a simple wiring diagram.

It would seem that the Oil Pressure cut off switch would be easier to ops check.
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