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  #11  
Old 01-02-2018, 02:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tbird6 View Post
...Is yours a modified stock column?
From inside my car, everything looks bone stock. I converted my stock Town & Country radio to play AM/FM/MP3 (with full 'seek' function ala: Gary Taymann Electric), I converted my vacuum wipers to electric (New Port Engineering) with full squirts and interval wipers (using stock dash knobs), I converted to power disk brakes with dual reservoir M/C, electric fan with 130-amp alt., and power rack and pinion steering.

I'm certainly not a 'purist' because without hesitation, I run my car on the highways or to cruises. That means, I must compete with the braking performance of modern cars on the road.

While I rebuilt our 292 Y-Block and C-O-M, I mounted my R&P steering. The scary part for most folks is, cutting the steering column and steering shaft.

As a side note: It happened that a buddy of mine really needed my steering gear box. I was happy to give him mine, so it still lives. I've swapped parts and services for years with many of my restorer buddies.

Ok so, manual shift clutch pedals use a "Z" bracket that mounts to the frame. Since ours is an automatic, I used all the stock frame holes for my conversion. The big reason why is because the holes are reinforced inside the frame. That's why you've never seen the frame 'crush' under the torque required for the steering box or idler arm. Ford welded 'curlicues' that surround the bolts, inside the frame halves.

I mocked-up the rack gear and fabricated simple plates to accommodate the frame holes and the rack gear rubber mounts. I made another bracket for the 'swivel eyelet' using the top frame holes. You could say that I started at the rack gear and worked my way up to the steering column.

All my hardware was purchased from speedwaymotors.com except for the nylon bushing I made at the very end of my steering column. NONE of my steering components are welded except for the bracketry. I used 'double-D' configuration joints that positively bear all the steering shaft stress. Power steering is such a gift on classic Fords.

Some restorers put a ball bearing at the end of the steering column. Mine isn't that fancy. I turned a piece of nylon on the lathe to fit inside the column, bored a clearance hole for the steering shaft and left a collar so it can't move up the column. A little grease and all is good.

I simply fitted all the joints to complete the links. My power steering pump was from my Mustang. I chose a rebuilt 1982-92 Chevrolet Cavalier rack gear which offers long tie rods (from the middle, like our OEM drag link) to eliminate bump steer. It works fantastic! My wheel spindles are not altered.

Other gears use much shorter tie rods (which have a shorter radius) that must be mounted farther from the #2 cross member:


This Chrysler gear creates a 'bump steer problem' because as the suspension moves up and down both spindle arms tend to pull into each other causing toe-out. If this happens around corners the problem worsens.

p38fighter, here are more pictures you asked for, showing a closer look:
Attached Images
File Type: jpg DSCN4953a.jpg (131.6 KB, 203 views)
File Type: jpg DSCN4955a.jpg (126.1 KB, 205 views)
File Type: jpg DSCN4956b.jpg (114.7 KB, 205 views)
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  #12  
Old 01-02-2018, 09:50 AM
Tbird6 Tbird6 is offline
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Thanks for the pictures.
I have not seen the old Y-block installed in a Squarebird before?
The single exhaust threw me off until you mentioned it was a 292.

The links mentioned are interesting but they all appear to be dead at this point in time.
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  #13  
Old 01-02-2018, 02:09 PM
tiltbed tiltbed is offline
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very nice explanation. i`ll have to wait untill the engine and trans are installed as i don`t want to interfer with the headers. How did you mate the GM arms and tie rod ends up with your ford spindles? can the GM arms be replaced with a set of arms with helm fittings?...thanks
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  #14  
Old 01-02-2018, 02:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tbird6 View Post
...I have not seen the old Y-block installed in a Squarebird before?..
This car is a '59 Galaxie. There isn't much difference but it came with a Y-Block. I should have put an FE in its place but I wanted to build the Y. I should have gone with my FE instinct because it's a better mill. Spindles for the 1959 Galaxie are the exact same part number as Squarebird spindles.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tiltbed View Post
...How did you mate the GM arms and tie rod ends up with your ford spindles?..
I'm not using GM arms at all. I'm using my original outer tie rods and these rods with associated heim joints (as mentioned, from https://www.speedwaymotors.com): CLICK HERE
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  #15  
Old 01-02-2018, 03:19 PM
RustyNCa RustyNCa is offline
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Nice job Dave, I wish the photos were larger so I could get a closer look at them. This is an item on my To-Do List,

Cheers Bryan
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  #16  
Old 01-02-2018, 05:21 PM
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Bryan, you can see the bolt ends through the frame members. My brackets are simple "L" shaped with clamps around the rack gear. The mid section moves side-to-side while the ends are stationary. Practically every auto parts store has one on their shelf at around $60. Oh, and they rarely ever leak.

This setup may be clearer by looking at the gear. Notice where the rubber mounts are:
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File Type: jpg 1983ChevyCavRackGear-final.jpg (74.7 KB, 274 views)
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  #17  
Old 01-03-2018, 03:17 PM
RustyNCa RustyNCa is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by simplyconnected View Post
Bryan, you can see the bolt ends through the frame members. My brackets are simple "L" shaped with clamps around the rack gear. The mid section moves side-to-side while the ends are stationary. Practically every auto parts store has one on their shelf at around $60. Oh, and they rarely ever leak.

This setup may be clearer by looking at the gear. Notice where the rubber mounts are:
Ah, okay, I was trying to picture how it functioned, that makes alot more sense now.

Regarding the power steering pump, we can't use the factory pump to power the rack?
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  #18  
Old 01-03-2018, 06:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RustyNCa View Post
...Regarding the power steering pump, we can't use the factory pump to power the rack?
For most non-mechanical people this information is going to be boring but I want to talk about some of the features of this rack gear...

Squarebirds have a separate piston so we all know how they work; basically there is linear piston/shaft motion between the ports. This newer rack gear works the exact same way with a more modern philosophy.

These rack gears are 'all inclusive' of the piston, control valve, and the rack and pinion gears. In order to accomplish all that the unit must be smaller which requires more hydraulic pressure to do the same work. With that in mind, consider these pictures:



The piston must live on one end. It's obvious which end the piston is by the hydraulic lines and the fact that it attaches to the rack gear.

The other end has the pinion gear AND end-room for the rack gear to traverse the entire stroke.

Most modern power steering pumps will work just fine because they come from rack and pinion setups. The older pumps don't output enough to satisfy a smaller diameter piston. - Dave
Attached Images
File Type: jpg R-Pstroke.jpg (101.6 KB, 199 views)
File Type: jpg R-Pvalve.jpg (137.0 KB, 199 views)
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Last edited by simplyconnected : 01-04-2018 at 04:47 PM. Reason: Pictures didn't show at all.
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  #19  
Old 06-02-2018, 01:54 PM
Tbird6 Tbird6 is offline
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Great conversion!
Any chance you could post some about the brackets you used?
Diagrams?
Any more details on which pump can be used and fit our FE engine brackets?
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  #20  
Old 06-02-2018, 03:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tbird6 View Post
Great conversion!
Any chance you could post some about the brackets you used?
Diagrams?
Any more details on which pump can be used and fit our FE engine brackets?..
I wish I could be more detailed but as the pictures show, this is a Galaxie with a Y-Block (it came stock). I fabricated the Mustang power steering pump using a 'C' bracket that bolts to my water pump housing. I did the same with my 130-amp alternator for the electric fan.

The brackets are simple 'L' -shaped that bolt into the same patterns as my steering box and idler arm. If you cannot pattern the frame, then use those components. Hole transfer punches work well but aren't necessary.

I have not retrofit to a FE engine but I can see that coming soon. Just about any pump from a R&P system will work. I happen to have one from the Mustang. I'm sure a GM or Chrysler will work as well.

The R&P conversion is great because it eliminates a lot of joints so all the steering wheel slop goes away. 'Simple is always better' because there are fewer things to go wrong. 'Off the shelf' parts are usually cheap and available everywhere. - Dave
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