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  #11  
Old 09-01-2018, 10:57 PM
Tbird1044 Tbird1044 is offline
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Mike:
Doesn't look too bad. I'd take a little pic and just hit the metal in the rusted areas, just to make sure it's not cancer and there is solid metal. As you can see, they sealed the heck out of the holes where the retaining bolts, for the filler panel, go through the body. This could definitely become a leak point. Also the square holes, as I remember, go right through to the trunk. Maybe I was hallucinating, but I sealed them also. You might want to check if that is a leak path, and let us know. It seemed strange for these holes to be in the location they were and not sealed.
As for seals for the rear of the car, these are the only ones I remember:
1. Trunk lid seal
2. Rear window rubber seal
3. Tail light seals where they penetrate to the trunk. I have a 60, so not sure if it was the same on a 59.
Some of the guys on Youtube were saying that you should use a sealer on the inside of the rubber gasket for the rear and front windshield. The guy that installed mine used nothing except some soapy water to slip things together. Mine hasn't been a problem, thought it doesn't see much water. It's definitely not a daily driver and sits mostly in the garage and gets the dry detail washes.
It also looks like your trunk stays up by itself. If so, you are lucky. I had mine staying open, until I got it back from the body/paint shop, and then the extra added weight makes me use the stick trick to keep it open. ;-(
Nyles
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  #12  
Old 09-03-2018, 10:28 PM
Brushwolf Brushwolf is offline
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Yes, the bolt holes for that trim and those square holes can all leak inside the body/trunk. My trunk lid stays 90% open, but there is a little weakness in the hinges. It never shuts on its own, or anything like that, though.

I have seen glass installs both ways too (with and without a sealant between glass and gasket and body and gasket). I think I will err on the side of caution and use a sealer.

I had a couple bolts break off that hold that exterior trim piece on, so have to fix that. At first I thought it was a foam seal around each retaining bolt, but it may be a "fence" around each bolt hole made with something resembling plumbers putty. It still can hold a new shape and doesn't crumble making me think they aren't foam (though there are some little foam wedges holding up the inside of the rear window gasket under the rear half of the package tray assembly..).

Had a couple of my kids here for the weekend and one left his car here needing new drive axles, sway bar links, strut sleeves, etc.. So, didn't get much done on the TBird.

But, ordered parts for the son's car and it will take at least a week for parts to arrive, so should be able to get back to TBird tomorrow. Sent the son home with my wife's car and her to work with my truck.

So, I am kinda stranded (except for the Internet), but did fire up the TBird again on Friday. Clicking and smoking a little, but it still runs at least. Gen light on (though it has a 68(?) Ford alternator). Oil light goes out when started and idling, but could swear it develops a hammering noise when revved up a bit...

Got my other quarter glass operating freely again. Really stiff from being left up for years, apparently.

Mike H
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  #13  
Old 09-04-2018, 12:15 AM
Tbird1044 Tbird1044 is offline
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Mike:
Can't say for sure what Ford sealant manual says, but I used dum dum strip caulk to seal the holes where the retaining bolts go through the body for the panel between the rear window and trunk. I also pop riveted some small plates over the square holes and made sure they were sealed. We'll see if others have any other recommendation.
Nyles
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  #14  
Old 09-04-2018, 01:00 AM
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jopizz jopizz is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brushwolf View Post
but could swear it develops a hammering noise when revved up a bit...Mike H
If the car sat for that long you might have stuck valves. That would account for the hammering you hear. It may not be lower end noise.

John
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  #15  
Old 09-06-2018, 08:46 PM
Brushwolf Brushwolf is offline
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Yes, my son and I had discussed that possibility as that exact thing happened on a 61 Sunliner FE that had been sitting for years. Stuck valves and bent some pushrods. Also had a bunch of bent pushrods in a 62 390 that had sat for 11 years. Long push rods seem to be prone to that, but probably just a symptom and not a cause. Not sure if I want to do too much work on the motor though, as I have several rebuilt ones already.

Mike H
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  #16  
Old 09-06-2018, 08:56 PM
Brushwolf Brushwolf is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tbird1044 View Post
Mike:
Can't say for sure what Ford sealant manual says, but I used dum dum strip caulk to seal the holes where the retaining bolts go through the body for the panel between the rear window and trunk. I also pop riveted some small plates over the square holes and made sure they were sealed. We'll see if others have any other recommendation.
Nyles
Still fixing the brackets on the underside of the panel, though it is taking so much time I am not sure whether I should have just looked for another panel.

Appears that there was a foam piece around the weld nut on the bracket and also some non-hardening sealant on the lower part it bolts to.

Looks in my case like it succeeded in keeping water from getting through for a long while since the brackets are in much worse shape than the body under it, which I would normally consider a good thing.

I will probably do similar to you as far as finding some kind of non-hardening caulk to try to imitate what the factory did somewhat.

Mike H
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  #17  
Old 09-07-2018, 12:15 AM
Tbird1044 Tbird1044 is offline
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I just looked in the Trim and Sealant manual, and it appears there was a thick foam gasket that went between the body and trim panel where the bolt goes through. They also recommended using a sealant besides the gasket. I could try and take a picture, but the T&S manual is not great quality, since they are all copies of reproductions.
Nyles
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  #18  
Old 09-07-2018, 02:44 AM
Brushwolf Brushwolf is offline
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Yes, I have a 1995 copy of Trim and Sealant Manual and in it they explain that some parts are very difficult to read as they were copied off very old originals.

I took one of the non-hardening plumbers-putty-like "dam" pieces off the car today. You can see them still in place on pics I posted a couple days ago. Didn't want to remove them until I had a plan or replacements.

In this pic, the piece on the left is the thick square (apparently foam) washer or gasket that was on the lower end of each of the panel bracket's weld-nuts and the piece on the right is the still-flexible "dam" that sat on the body and presumably designed to be squeezed down to a waterproof(?) seal when each bolt was tightened.

So, the piece on the left was on top of and squeezed against the piece on the right when assembled.

Mike H
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