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  #1  
Old 05-18-2010, 09:26 PM
Popcorn Popcorn is offline
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Default 1965 T-Bird

So I have been looking for a car and found a 1965 T-Bird for sale. It is $3500. It looks to be in pretty fair condition. It has to have the carb rebuilt but they guy says it runs fine. We started it up but it has bad gas and he didn't want to light a fire. He also said that they really only drove it around the house. I don't know if windows work or air works or how well it does on the road. I have no experience on a bird and need help. What should I be looking for? Is this a good price for this car? Is this a kind of car that is going to give me a bunch of problems and keep investing money? PLEASE HELP!!!!! Thanks!
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Old 05-18-2010, 09:50 PM
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Mississippi has some of the finest cars in America. Look for rust. Check out the floors, rockers, etc. Engine and powertrain are secondary, meaning, they can always be rebuilt if they are worn.

First thing... get that old gas out, QUICK! Don't try to run it out (in ANY old car).

Drain the tank and check the tank for rust. If you have rust, it won't come out by itself, because there is nowhere for it to go.

Drain the tank, and drop it. I would use a garden hose to wash any debris out. For the pieces that won't come out, I would use a wet/dry vac in the middle of the yard, far away from buildings. Wash everything down to one corner and suck it out with the vac until the tank is clean.

Alcohol will get the water droplets out, so will gasohol. Keep your gas fresh. Change your gas filters after you flush the old gas and pieces of crap out of the lines- Dave
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Old 05-18-2010, 10:03 PM
Popcorn Popcorn is offline
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So then would you recomend buying the car. There is little to no rust on the car, that is always the first thing I look for. And what do you think about the price? Fair?
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Old 05-18-2010, 10:58 PM
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Depending on how much work is involved, that car would be a steal at twice the price.

In Michigan, they could get an easy six grand. If it really has no rust, a sound body is worth that asking price.
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Old 05-18-2010, 11:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Popcorn View Post
...Is this a kind of car that is going to give me a bunch of problems and keep investing money?...
Let me say one thing very loudly:
Investing in classic cars is a BAD IDEA. We do this as a hobby and a passion. If you want to make money, put it in a bank and draw interest.

Classic cars are meant to be shown at cruises and shows. These require entrance fees, etc. Not many folks have classic cars because they are expensive to shelter and keep up.

Our reward is the enjoyment and gratification we get from driving and showing these fine machines. They are unique in all the world, and people turn their heads and take notice whenever we pass by.
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Old 05-19-2010, 12:46 AM
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Default 1965 T-Bird

Hi Jennifer. Welcome aboard! It sounds like you found yourself a Flairbird in fairly good condition. Dave gave you some good information. If it does not have rust problems, that is a big plus. You should be able to clean and adjust the carb and take care of that easily enough. The gas is a bad situation. Dave gave you some good tips on fixing that problem. I do not remember if the Flairbirds have a drain cock on them or not. One of the Flairbird owners can tell you that. In any case, you will want to drain that bad gas out of it, and go through the cleaning process Dave mentioned to get a clean tank and then some good gas in her.

You should find out more about her, like if the windows, lights, gauges, radio, windshield wipers, AC if it has it, heater, and anything else you can think of, works on it okay. If they do, that will be much less to have to work on to get fixed.

As for the price, it sounds great if the car does not need a ton of work on it. How is the paint and the interior? Do they need to be restored? Do you want it be your daily driver, or a car that you can drive on weekends and enjoy? Do you want it for show? If so, you will probably have to put many, many thousands of dollars in it to get it to show level. But if you want to just enjoy it as it is, after you getting it running right, and it does not need a lot of work on it, go for it! The price, as Dave said, is really good. Unless it will require a ton of money to fix it up.

If you can get the VIN # and the Data Plate information off it, I can run that for you to learn more about the car. If you do not know where to look, open the drivers door and look for a metal tag bradded on the post where the door closes on. The information should be there. What engine and tranny does it have? Probably a 390 and COM. What color and interior color is it? Which model is it? To learn more about that year click on this link.

http://automotivemileposts.com/tbird...lections.shtml
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Last edited by YellowRose : 05-19-2010 at 11:58 AM.
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Old 05-19-2010, 02:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by simplyconnected View Post
Let me say one thing very loudly:
Investing in classic cars is a BAD IDEA. We do this as a hobby and a passion. If you want to make money, put it in a bank and draw interest.


Our reward is the enjoyment and gratification we get from driving and showing these fine machines. They are unique in all the world, and people turn their heads and take notice whenever we pass by.
So true - our $$ are 'invested' (spent ) in the enjoyment of improving our cars and the thrill when we take them out for a drive, cost is not really part of the equation..
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Old 05-19-2010, 12:15 PM
RustyNCa RustyNCa is offline
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Yes, the tank does have a drain, I had to use it on my son's 65. If the body is decent, interior is okay, and the car is a solid runner, I would say that is a very decent price.

You say you are not sure if the windows work, is it a power window car? Is it a Landau
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Old 05-19-2010, 05:47 PM
troubsullivan troubsullivan is offline
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all i can say is that my 64 has cost me losts of money and that i have enjoyed every minute of it's continuing restoration. so much so that i picked up a 60 not too long ago that the folks on this forum have been helping me with.

having said that, if it were me i would really insist on driving it down the road for a good 10-20 minutes to really see/hear/feel any issues, a spin around the house wouldn't cut it. if the owner is really serious about selling it he should be the one to drain the tank of the bad gas and have the car ready for a decent test drive. if he doesn't want to make that effort there may be some good reason/reasons for that (and all bad for you!) and i would walk away. there are plenty of good, reasonably priced birds out there to choose from.
good luck,
patrick
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  #10  
Old 05-19-2010, 06:41 PM
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Dan Leavens Dan Leavens is offline
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Jennifer just to chime in. The others have made very sound suggestions with respect to this classic. Patrick's statement of the seller making sure that all the " bad gas " is out and new gas in for a long test drive, will tell you alot of things.First his integrity and also his willingness to sell the car as is and teell you what is needed. I would personally find someone, brother ( in-law) friend who knows cars, to join you on the test drive and at the very least have a mechanic go over it for you. The cost is very, very reasonable for that year but as they say " if it is too good to be true it probably is.".. Good luck.Tom with respect to your comment about the $$$ we spend on the upkeep of our classics, Is that why we have them
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