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  #11  
Old 04-30-2017, 07:46 AM
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I wonder if the engineers saw the vaccum driven Trico motor as being incapable of moving a larger wiper, which would have both more weight and more drag? Particularly in a snow situation.
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Old 04-30-2017, 12:30 PM
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If this were 1960 with this car, I would replace the arms with something heavy duty. Of course I'd be 7 years old and my dad might object. It's not 1960 and these little blades will do just fine in the sun.

I note the blades are so short and don't overlap that it's impossible for the ends to hang up on each other like my 1980 Corvette did several times until using a little Bon Ami on the glass.

Dean
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  #13  
Old 04-30-2017, 04:47 PM
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Using Trico suited the mechanical engineers and it was easy to buy the package from a well-established vendor.

Vacuum wipers, as we discussed in earlier threads, are useless for folks in northern winters and those who live in mountains. They simply don't work when vacuum is low (upon acceleration or mountain climbing) or when any resistance (like snow) poses a resistance. Rain actually helps lubricate wiper blades. Larger arms add more resistance and is counter-productive.

At home at Ford, politics played a big role between designers because the mechanical guys were deathly afraid their jobs would be 'taken over' by more electrical engineers. We see a slow progression toward electrical advancements which also required larger generators/alternators. I gotta say, they did everything they could using vacuum (like trunk release, e-brake release, etc.) before finally coming to their senses and employing more reliable electrical systems.

Electric wipers were an 'extra cost' option, introduced because the competition offered it. The reasons why the whole industry dropped vacuum wipers are self evident. How long did we use that rubber bulb on the floor for squirts until the electric washer motor took over? I laugh, sitting here thinking about it AND the expensive contraption Squarebirds used. Hey, maybe cheap slot-car motors drove prices down. - Dave
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Old 04-30-2017, 07:54 PM
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and don't forget the Bullet Birds had hydraulic wipers powered by the power steering pump. Worked very well but expensive to manufacture. Lots of interesting changes in the auto industry and the way things were done. Hydraulic windows on some cars, vacuum systems working lots of things as mentioned, early AC with units in the trunk and ducting up through the rear deck, Power steering pumps on the back of generators (GM) and many others. Often said "they don't build them like they used to" is so true!!
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  #15  
Old 04-30-2017, 08:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Johnston View Post
...Often said "they don't build them like they used to" is so true!!
...and in most cases I'm glad they don't.

But hey, unless you try who would know the test of time? It's interesting to learn about methods and ideas that went by the wayside and never brought back. Or the other way; Ford started with 6-volt gauges, went to 12-volt in '56, then quickly changed back to 6-volt in '57 with a CVR. So, 1956 came with the ONLY factory 12-volt gauges that Ford ever used.

How long have we used DOT-3? It seems to be the ONLY fluid that hasn't changed and cars still come with it. If a brake system is hydraulic, why didn't they use hydraulic fluid? Instead, DOT-3 is glycol-based and NOT compatible with petroleum-based fluids.
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  #16  
Old 04-30-2017, 08:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Johnston View Post
and don't forget the Bullet Birds had hydraulic wipers powered by the power steering pump. Worked very well but expensive to manufacture. Lots of interesting changes in the auto industry and the way things were done. Hydraulic windows on some cars, vacuum systems working lots of things as mentioned, early AC with units in the trunk and ducting up through the rear deck, Power steering pumps on the back of generators (GM) and many others. Often said "they don't build them like they used to" is so true!!
Only the '63 Bulletbirds had hydraulic wipers. Most '61 and all '62 Thunderbirds had electric wipers which worked perfectly well. Why Ford decided to change is another mystery.

John
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  #17  
Old 04-30-2017, 09:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jopizz View Post
...Why Ford decided to change is another mystery.
I tried to explain this, John. Fluid power is mechanical.

Quote:
Originally Posted by simplyconnected View Post
...At home at Ford, politics played a big role between designers because the mechanical guys were deathly afraid their jobs would be 'taken over' by more electrical engineers...
You wouldn't believe the pressures and politics involved in the auto industry. Nobody wants to make a mistake so they move cautiously. Lots of 'pretty-boys' are lined-up hoping to be heard by the boss. It took Lee Iacocca, with all his successful Mustang decisions, seven years to get launch approval because he was hated by HFII and his office was kept miles away from world HQ so Henry didn't have to see him every morning.
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  #18  
Old 04-30-2017, 09:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by simplyconnected View Post
I tried to explain this, John. Fluid power is mechanical.
I guess the old adage was true. "If it ain't broke fix it".

John
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  #19  
Old 05-01-2017, 12:31 PM
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In this age we trade vehicle tech dollars for fossil fuel dollars. Look at the 8 and 10 speed auto transmissions that have to cost manufacturers and consumer more initially in order to save .5 MPG over the life of the vehicle.

I heard someone at FoMoCo invented intermittent wipers. I recall my brother's 1964 Thunderbird having a delay wiper that was just a slower wipe. How long did that go on? and how does this relate to that engineer?

Dean
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