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  #11  
Old 12-11-2017, 12:53 PM
Deanj Deanj is offline
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The verdict on the Eastwood glass sanding-polishing kit is:

Save your money. Go to a pro and get your glass improved.

This kit came with the diamond dust slurry mixer, a 3 inch hook and loop attachment, and a 3 inch pad. I added 3 sanding disc for an extra $10 bringing the total damages to $60.

Part of the problem doing this the first time is the inability to recognize what's needed to address the damage. I sanded my windshield with the finest disc and followed with the polishing. The kit basically says don't use the most abrasive disc unless you like wavy glass, and so I was bluffed into the finest disc. Tip: Make 1/3 of the polishing slurry as you think you need.
During this exercise I could tell the difference in the glass where the polishing missed. The glass does look very clean and improved in general appearance, but it's probable better for your daily driver annual spring maintenance. Close inspection reveals little of the original issue has changed even after 3-4 passes each with sanding disc and polishing pad.

Dean
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  #12  
Old 12-12-2017, 08:38 AM
Tbird6 Tbird6 is offline
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The polishing kits won't do anything for your sandstorm problem. The glass is pitted-NOT scratched. Two completely different types of damage. This type of damage is the worst especially at night when you approach oncoming cars.

One rule of thumb is if the scratch or other surface damage is large enough to catch with your finger nail it's too big to fix. Eastwood is a over priced rip off. If you want to try polishing the damage what you want is some Cerium Oxide compound. These kits are very cheap and common on EBay. Here is one for $14. For that price it's cheap enough to give it try if you want.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/34Pcs-Deep-....c100505.m3226

If you replace it please post back with what you think and the price. I have found even the plain flat side glass is NOT the same as it was in 1959. I find all the new glass to be thinner and requires more setting material and thicker door run material.
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  #13  
Old 12-12-2017, 11:13 AM
Deanj Deanj is offline
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Thanks. I probable won't replace it because it's such a robust piece. I'll have to wait until I can drive her again to see if there's any improvement from the polishing. It sure looks clean.

Yeah I noticed my side glass, the replaced glass which looks beautiful, has some inherent violet tint that I see only when it's parked in my garage. The original glass has no such "film". It could be in the non-glass laminate that I assume is present in all new safety glass.

I'm just mystified about the pitting because I had cars with almost the same mileage that didn't look like this. It's a Littleton, Colorado car with almost 83K now, 4K of that in Willoughby, OH. Lot's of rocks in CO?

Dean
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  #14  
Old 03-06-2018, 02:56 PM
Deanj Deanj is offline
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Changed coolant and drove my 1960 for the first time in bright sunlight since polishing the windshield.

Very nice. The numerous small nicks are still there, but the haze is gone-and that's a real improvement.

The kit I used is overpriced, and the recommendation by Tbird6 might be a better way to proceed. I just glad this worked to keep me from replacing original glass.

Dean
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  #15  
Old 03-14-2018, 12:59 PM
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If you search the site for "windshield replacement" you'll find multiple mentions that many of the replacement windshields do not have the top to bottom curve that you see in the center when looking at a side profile of the car. Instead, they are flat. Something to keep in mind if choosing to replace.
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  #16  
Old 03-14-2018, 02:17 PM
Deanj Deanj is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dgs View Post
If you search the site for "windshield replacement" you'll find multiple mentions that many of the replacement windshields do not have the top to bottom curve that you see in the center when looking at a side profile of the car. Instead, they are flat. Something to keep in mind if choosing to replace.
I see. So are these flat replacements the new norm or just inferior glass? My side was replaced before I bought my 1960 and while the FoMoCo logo is missing, the pristine tinted glass is worthwhile.

Dean
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  #17  
Old 03-16-2018, 09:03 AM
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I would say that not having to put additional curvature into the glass kept the cost down a bit. Since we are talking very low volume here, that might have been important. (the windshield having no other application than 58-60 TBirds).

I have a replacement windshield in my '58 that itself is pretty old (I will say 20 years old) and it actually does have the additional curvature if viewed from the side. How that happened, I have no idea as it was put in before I got the car in 2003. I would hazzard a guess most owners have never taken notice. I only did after reading some posts on this site many years ago.

A consideration for me if I were considering having it replaced would be: can I find someone who will do a good job? Is changing the glass in a 1958 TBird the same as a 2012 Chevrolet? I know that on current cars they can replace the windshields pretty quickly and easily but do the techniques carry over to old cars? if not I may get something back I am not happy with. If so, fine and it is now just a matter of money and source.

Speaking of which . . .I took a look at Mac's. They show both clear and tinted available. In the $700 range. Whether you have a hardtop or convertible may factor in. Let us not forget shipping cost, which is doubtless not cheap for such an item. Do not appear to have the additional curvature we spoke of.

Wonder's book says the laminated approach changed to solid, tempered in 1961 (p. 8).

John
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  #18  
Old 03-16-2018, 11:01 AM
Deanj Deanj is offline
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John, I would guess for rollover reasons new cars have more surface area to bond with tape. I know that the T-Bird installation rubber molding has a tendency to dry out, crack, and leak. At least that's what happened on my rear glass when I found a trunk full of water after a shop left it in the rain.

I could be happy with thinner glass, slight variation in tint, but the contours and quality of installation must be right. For $700 less new molding the glass should not only be perfect, it should install itself.

Dean
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  #19  
Old 03-16-2018, 12:46 PM
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old story you made me think of: here and there are hardtops that people made into convertibles, for whatever reasons.

More than one person has been tooling along in their pseudo convertible and, for no apparent reason, the windshield cracked.

Why? a hardtop does not have as much reinforcement, especially in the rocker panel area. Remove the roof, a significant structural component, and the car flexes more. The poor windshield apparently could not quite make up the difference.

(you can look around this site for an article on the rocker panel differences)

John
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  #20  
Old 03-16-2018, 01:27 PM
Deanj Deanj is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnG View Post
...a hardtop does not have as much reinforcement, especially in the rocker panel area. Remove the roof, a significant structural component, and the car flexes more. The poor windshield apparently could not quite make up the difference.

(you can look around this site for an article on the rocker panel differences)

John
Very true. In fact my friend says his 34 year restored 1966 Corvette convertible twists less with the top up. ( A white collar guy, he restored everything but the body himself over 2 years. This included acid dipping the frame, welding classes, and an assembly manual.)

I insist my 2016 Challenger RT Classic rides softer with both windows down.

Dean
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