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  #11  
Old 03-27-2016, 11:46 AM
olevet olevet is offline
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I live on 40 acres and ran my own shop up until 5 years ago or so, I recently built a shop by my house, The New shop is 30 X 40 with 12 foot joists so a Lift will work fine,

My concern was the 2 post versus 4. I have Jacks and stands from my old lift.
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  #12  
Old 03-27-2016, 12:00 PM
Joe Johnston Joe Johnston is offline
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I prefer the stability of a 4 post drive on, but they do take up more room and can be a bit awkward at times for some jobs. Many 2 post lifts require a reinforced footer to mount on. Each style has its advantages and disadvantages - no one size fits all uses, garages or checkbooks. Enjoy and work safely!
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  #13  
Old 03-27-2016, 08:45 PM
keith keith is offline
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If you don't do transmission work, exhaust or oil changes, this works great for me. 54".
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  #14  
Old 03-27-2016, 09:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tbird1044 View Post
I have suffered and done several jobs, working under the car on my back, while it was up on jack stands. Think I'm getting to old for this though.
Nyles
Sums up my act too Nyles!
No money and no height in my garage means it will be what I'll have to keep on doing for the foreseeable future...
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  #15  
Old 03-28-2016, 08:37 AM
Yadkin Yadkin is offline
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This arrived at my friend's shop last week, not running after sitting in a barn for 20 years. It came off a flat bed so they loaded it into the shop backwards and raised it with the two post.

This is a '70 Charger convertible with a 440 6 pack. The rear of this car weighs nothing relative to the front. I told the mechanic, please, please, put a transmission jack under the radiator support, or a 4x4...
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  #16  
Old 03-28-2016, 09:49 AM
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simplyconnected simplyconnected is offline
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That makes my skin crawl. This guy knows nothing about distributing weight for a safe lift. The lift's mounting bolts cannot take that kind of stress.

Here are the stands I refer to: CLICK HERE
As the web site explains, one goes under each end of the car.
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  #17  
Old 03-28-2016, 10:42 AM
OX1 OX1 is offline
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Not sure anyone can truly answer your actual question, but 2 post lifts have been around way longer than squarebirds.

It seems unlikely to me that Ford designed a chassis that could survive the combination of dynamic forces from the drivetrain and going down the road, yet deform beyond yield from sitting on a lift. That's assuming the vehicle is lifted @ the points ford recommends (which may be the real question).
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  #18  
Old 03-28-2016, 03:37 PM
Joe Johnston Joe Johnston is offline
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Quote:
yet deform beyond yield from sitting on a lift. That's assuming the vehicle is lifted @ the points ford recommends (which may be the real question).
How true!

In the late 60's and early 70's I killed time at a local Texaco station while going to college. Picked up a few bucks on short wrecker calls and other odd jobs. We had a Mustang convertible in for front brake work and had the whole front picked up by a big air powered bumper jack that lifted from under both bumper mounts. As it went up we saw the top sag and the doors were impossible to open! Yes proper lifting is essential - especially as a car gets a few years on it.

Me? I still will take a 4 post drive on for my use - but everyone is different!
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  #19  
Old 03-29-2016, 05:34 AM
OX1 OX1 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Johnston View Post
How true!

In the late 60's and early 70's I killed time at a local Texaco station while going to college. Picked up a few bucks on short wrecker calls and other odd jobs. We had a Mustang convertible in for front brake work and had the whole front picked up by a big air powered bumper jack that lifted from under both bumper mounts. As it went up we saw the top sag and the doors were impossible to open! Yes proper lifting is essential - especially as a car gets a few years on it.

Me? I still will take a 4 post drive on for my use - but everyone is different!
Luckily, I have one of each. There are things you cannot really do on a 2 post (or the job is harder).

1. Wheel alignment, even a hacked home job is difficult on the floor.
2. Aligning doors or replacement door strikers (again, can do on floor if you don't mind bending over for hours on end).
3. New exh, as susp hangs down and you never really know if it fits right until you put it back on the ground.
4. Front springs with lower control arm. Really no good place to jack under control arm enough to compress spring, without lifting car off front pad(s) on a 2 post.
5. Suspension on solid axle. Much easier with axles sitting on runways and controlling height of body with center jack.
6. Some body work. Can't remove some front fenders as rear lower bolt is right where front arm is on some asymmetric 2 posts.
7. Oil change on certain cars. Fox bodies push bottom of sway bar forward when susp droops, putting it right under front drain plug. Then oil runs down both sides of sway bar and all over floor. (nit picking I know, but it is what it is).


2 post still best for trans/engine work/pulls and easiest for brake and tire removal.
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  #20  
Old 03-29-2016, 03:46 PM
olevet olevet is offline
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So as long as im careful the two post will work OK with out distorting the Unibody?
I have the floor reinforced with 12 inch deep concrete and rebar crossed at 12 in also for about an 8 ft square area.
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