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  #41  
Old 04-19-2017, 01:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by c4clewis View Post
Make sure you get those shims in AND the bolts TIGHTENED!!! I went through several wheels because a shop never tightened them. I couldn't figure out what what causing the wheels to break, yes literally break. Without the shims in and tightened, every time you hit a bump it can change the alignment.
Matt, I found this post on another thread (about lower control arm shims). Are you saying this IS the cause of your broken wheels?

We have been waiting for the results from Coker but also read about your toe-in, welded bushings and lack of shims. - Dave
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  #42  
Old 04-19-2017, 02:06 PM
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Dave, as far as I can tell, I think this was the cause of the wheels cracking. I only had a few days to drive it once I got the bolts tightened down, and boy did it make a difference. I wish I had more time to drive it before I lef tot tell you for sure, but I've been in Afghanistan for the last 3 months now. So the definitive answer will have to wait until next year.
But, yes. I think that was the cause.
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  #43  
Old 03-14-2018, 10:48 AM
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After getting settled in after yet another move and meeting Ray at the South Texas Thunderbird Club meeting last night, I can say with definity that it was the loose lower A-arm bolts that were causing the cracking.

Why the bolts were either never tightened at the shop that put the front end back on after powder-coating I don't know. I have also had several alignments as the front end kept getting wonky, but those aren't bolts that would normally be checked I guess since there isn't any adjustment to them.

If any of you have excessively wandering steering when you hit a bump in the road, may I suggest checking all the suspension bolts when you put your car up on a lift next time. After I found those loose bolts, I went through the entire front end and tightened everything, made a world of difference.

There is a saying in my profession that I guess I need to bring to any work that I have done on my cars... Trust but verify.
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  #44  
Old 03-14-2018, 02:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by c4clewis View Post
...After I found those loose bolts, I went through the entire front end and tightened everything, made a world of difference...
I hope you tightened the bolts while the car was on its wheels and sitting at a normal stance.

I can guess, that was the reason why this tightening procedure was omitted and then forgotten. Tightening urethane bushings while the wheels are hanging will hyper-extend the urethane which causes early failure.

This is why it is so important to follow the Shop Manual procedures.

In your case, you didn't do the work but hired someone else. Sometimes shops have multiple workers do your job.
I like your saying but I have one as well... Assume nothing
This comes from working with electricity which cannot be seen but requires a high degree of safety to avoid injury and component damage.
You ultimately corrected your job, yourself. For this reason alone, I do my own car work. Mechanics cannot take their time and make money but I can. Also, I'm the only guy working on my car so that ends assumptions.

This 'lesson' cost you a lot of money due to damage from mistakes that should never have been, especially after hiring professional mechanics. Professional mechanics should either have experience or the ability to read the Shop Manual before starting the work. That shop needs to make restitution for all resulting costs. My 2, and I'm sorry this happened to you. - Dave
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