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  #11  
Old 10-13-2014, 08:13 PM
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Rock&Roll Firebird Rock&Roll Firebird is offline
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Thank you John, I'd be surprised if the Rockauto wouldn't have these...
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  #12  
Old 10-13-2014, 08:23 PM
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What about putting a slight mixture of the citric acid with a distilled water for few of the cleaning cycles? It does an awesome job on dissolving calcium and stone sediments...
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Old 10-14-2014, 11:06 PM
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Use whatever solution you think will work.
We use phosphoric acid, found in many products like "CLR" (which means, Calcium, Lime, Rust):

CLR is available in most hardware stores in the USA.

Temperature makes a huge difference as most acids work much faster if heated. I'm sure you can find phosphoric acid in other products where you live. It's usually green in color if that helps.
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Old 10-15-2014, 11:15 AM
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When I removed my freeze plugs I was surprised at all the mud like crud that was caked in there. If your engine has not been rebuilt lately definitely do that. Dave Dare, why do you say; "At idle, your water pump is not moving coolant." I had thought that the fan clutch spun at lower idles to keep the air flowing at a stop, but at higher rpm's the fan slipped and let the blow thru air cool the radiator?

Here's what I did with mine;
I took it out of the car, straightened all the mushed and dinged spots so the air would flow through better. It wasn't in bad shape, but every little bit helps.
I then hosed out the fins from the engine side to the front side - a little bit of dirt and such washed out there too.
I then laid the thing flat with the hose side up and filled it with distilled white vinegar. I let it set over night and then some - about 16 hours.
Next I heated it via propane torch all along the tubes, I could hear a little boiling vinegar every once in a while.
I emptied it and flushed it thoroughly with the garden hose on high.
Then I reinstalled it and filled it with water, ran it till hot, and then drained it - did this several times to get all the anti freeze out.
Then I used Prestone radiator flush as recommended.
I flushed that out by draining the radiator, filling with water, running until it flowed hot, then draining the radiator again. I repeated that several times until it ran clear.

I topped it off with one and a half gallons of anti freeze and it's running much cooler. At stop and go cruising speed it's around 195. I took it down the highway and it's just over 190. Ran it up and down an open stretch of highway at 3000 rpm, stomped on it up hill to 4000 rpm and it stayed between 190 and 195. Heck of a lot better!

I have since then removed the expansion tank and it runs at the same temperatures just fine. It's great to have that tank out of the way.

Dave J
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Old 10-16-2014, 02:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davidmij View Post
When I removed my freeze plugs I was surprised at all the mud like crud that was caked in there. If your engine has not been rebuilt lately definitely do that. Dave Dare, why do you say; "At idle, your water pump is not moving coolant."...
Dave, it looks like you answered your own question.

If your cylinders are caked with crud, how on earth can the water pump flow coolant at idle speeds?

The idea is to keep coolant on every surface of your cylinders. If flow stops, steam bubbles form on the iron, which further holds back coolant from touching the metal surfaces. You already know what steam does in a system, it must be allowed to escape before too much pressure builds.

Vinegar works in coffee pots but notice, they apply heat and run the pot through its cycle. Plain vinegar takes a lot longer at ambient temperature.

Yes, I know you used a propane torch but pay close attention to what the sounds are telling you. If the hollow core is open for example, heated coolant will flow, carrying heat with it. If you get to an area where it immediately boils, flow has stopped in that core because it's full of lime and deposits.

What do you do? I let the acid eat more lime... BTW, the more lime it eats, the weaker the acid concentration becomes. You can freeze or boil some of the water out of your vinegar to make it much more concentrated. I use phosphoric acid because that's what is inside Prestone. Phosphoric acid is about $11/quart. Vinegar is a lower grade and cheaper acid. Both are environmentally friendly.

So, your cooling system depends on air flow AND coolant flow or it cannot carry heat away. What you did to clean your radiator (heat exchanger) was very good. It proved itself on the road test. Most radiator shops couldn't be bothered, soaking someone's radiator for days. They want to sell you a new one and install it in minutes.

Don't shoot yourself in the foot by eliminating the expansion tank. Its main function is to carry air to the highest point in your cooling system. If another area becomes the highest point, it will have a big bubble. You don't want that to happen in your engine.
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Old 10-17-2014, 10:03 AM
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Thanks Dave, good points there. My radiator hose and cap are the highest points in the system still, and seem to be doing well for a while now.

I thought what you had said meant that the water pump wasn't turning or moving any water while an engine idles, that's where I got confused.

I guess my point to Steve is that there are a lot of things that can contribute to the system not cooling as well as it should. You might as well just do them all rather than one at a time until you get results. Do be VERY careful about using a torch though.

Dave J
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