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  #11  
Old 09-13-2014, 01:08 PM
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partsetal partsetal is offline
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My solution in dealing with these vent frames is the 5/32 pop rivet w/3/16-14" range. The head doesn't look too bad at the top of the frame, and I could disguise it if needed. I also use these to rivet the channel to the frame, using an extension for the nose of my rivet gun to reach into the channel. I then grind much of the head away to prevent interference with the edge of the glass.
Carl
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  #12  
Old 09-13-2014, 04:12 PM
Tbird1044 Tbird1044 is offline
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Aren't the rivets fun to deal with??
When I talked with the people selling rivets, I seem to remember that they said you should have 1/2 the rivet diameter sticking through the hole to flatten. I'm sure the correct ratio could be found on the net. If your rivets are too long, you could always use a dremel grinder and shorten them to the correct length. I'm surprised you were able to find or get hollow rivets. I ended up drilling solid rivets.
With the hollow rivets, I put a piece of brass over the anvil on my vise, and used that to back up the rivet head. Then I took like a 3/8 bolt, and with a small grinder, I put a concave sphere on the end of the bolt. With the rivet in place, I used a center punch to set the rivet and spread the edges. Then I used the bolt I made and finished setting the rivet with that.
I did use 5/32 pop rivets where ever I could. Much easier, especially on attaching the vertical rail. Like Partsetal said, I also had to make a little spacer, or used small washers, so I could get the rivet gun head into some of the channels. Only problem doing that is, if you space it to far, the rivet gun won't grab the nail for the pop rivet.
Make sure you have a helper to do this. One to hold the frame and one to set the rivets.
Nyles

Last edited by Tbird1044 : 09-13-2014 at 04:14 PM. Reason: more info
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  #13  
Old 09-13-2014, 06:33 PM
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partsetal partsetal is offline
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The rivets used for this application are "semi-tubular" rivets which means that it is hollow at the tip but solid otherwise. Of course they are designed for a specific grip range. They are set with a tool that spreads the tube as it rolls the edges. I seen these and they are too big to use on the vent frame rivets. I actually made one from a small piece of bar stock and it worked like a champ on the bench, but too unwieldy to position in the vent frame.
I imagine that it took a lot of special tooling at the factory to assemble these vent frames.
Carl
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