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  #1  
Old 03-06-2013, 05:51 PM
Bill A Bill A is offline
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Default Which timing cover gasket to use?

Hi,

I am rebuilding my 1962 352 and got the Fel-Pro gasket kit for the job. There are two timing case cover gaskets, one is blue paper and other is black and about 1/8" thick. Can't find info on which to use or why there are two. Any help out there?

Thanks,

Bill A

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  #2  
Old 03-06-2013, 07:07 PM
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Bill, as long as you get a name brand gasket like Victor or Fel-Pro, it really doesn't matter much. Personally, I have never seen a timing cover gasket thicker than about 1/16". The timing cover is one area with the fewest issues. Remember that some water pump bolts go into your water jacket and those threads should be coated with teflon plumber's compound.

If you are doing a timing chain set change, get the timing cover gasket set which should include the front seal, water pump gaskets and the fuel pump gasket (along with the main timing cover gaskets).

My hat goes off to you for spending a few hours on a new chain. The payback is well worth it. May I suggest you get a chain set with multiple crank sprocket slots, so you can advance the cam by 4 degrees (for better low-end torque). - Dave
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Last edited by simplyconnected : 03-06-2013 at 07:23 PM.
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  #3  
Old 03-07-2013, 03:32 PM
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Ian M Greer Ian M Greer is offline
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Bill if your working on a 62 then unless there has been a motor swap you have a 390 cu. inch motor. the only motor available at that time when new . Ian
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Old 03-08-2013, 01:01 AM
Bill A Bill A is offline
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Default Engine and Gaskets

Dave and Ian, thanks for taking the time to respond. Yes, the engine has been swapped but I don't care. As long as I can make it reliable, that's what is important. The block will be bored and honed, new bearings, oil pump, camshaft, timing chain, pistons, rings, valves etc. The gasket set I bought is for a complete engine rebuild. I have all the gaskets and seals I need from oil pan to intake. I did not buy a separate timing chain kit. This is a quality Fel-Pro kit but they gave me two different gaskets, one thin and one thick as I described. I'm sure this was not an accident on their part. There has to be two different applications. I'm trying to find out which is the correct one for me.

Thanks for your input.

Bill A
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Old 03-08-2013, 05:47 AM
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Bill, you bought a gasket kit that fits a HOST of FE engines. You probably got a few sets of intake manifold gaskets, too.

Pay attention to your teardown and take lots of pictures. When it comes time to put it back, you can look at the pics to determine what was in there... Simply match your old parts (and gaskets) with the new gaskets.

Let me know how it's going and ask lots of questions. - Dave
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Old 03-08-2013, 04:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill A View Post
...The block will be bored and honed, new bearings, oil pump, camshaft, timing chain, pistons, rings, valves etc. The gasket set I bought is for a complete engine rebuild. I have all the gaskets and seals I need from oil pan to intake. I did not buy a separate timing chain kit...
Seriously, Bill... You live in a good part of the country to find old engines. Ford made improvements in FE engines and they are included in the most common engine Ford ever made, the 390.

390s are backward compatible, so it will slip right in your older Ford. Parts are far cheaper because there are so many out there. Your gasket set will work on the 390 or 352. So will the oil pump.

I strongly encourage you to shop around for a whole 390 engine core. You should find one for around $300. Ford put them in F-series pickups, vans, and all the cars (including T-bird). From the outside, you can't tell the difference. The 390 has more stroke. The engine all-around, has more components available for it. For example, I only use roller timing chains. No.... they don't make one for the 352 because the cam snout is different, and not enough folks order parts for the 352. EBay is loaded with parts for the 390, including true roller chain sets.

Since you are spending the money on machining costs, let your shop do a 390. Machining cost is the same, but again, parts are more available and cheaper for the 390.

Another example: Edelbrock offers aluminum heads and intake for the 390. This is a good move for better cooling, better compression ratio and about 100-lb weight savings. They come with hardened exhaust seats, viton seals, bronze guides, stainless valves, and USED, they fetch $1,000. You will spend as much on cast iron heads, and end up with newly rebuilt heads worth around $300. Edelbrock heads do not fit a 352 because of valve clearance at the cylinder wall; just another example of supply and more popular demand of the 390/427 (they have the same crank).

You can reuse all the parts bolted onto your 352, except the cam & crank.

How much of this work will you do yourself? - Dave
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  #7  
Old 03-20-2013, 12:34 PM
Bill A Bill A is offline
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Default Timing cover gaskets

Dave,

Thanks for the input on the 390. I don't know how else to say it but I am not interested in repacing my 352 with a 390. I've said this before. I am only interested in making my car more reliable. My crank is virgin and has no noticeable wear and needs no machining. I really don't see an advantage to me in buying another block that can be a pig in a poke. My block is now bored and honed and ready to be assembled.

I did contact Federal Mogul about the engine gasket kit I purchased. Tech service told me my 352 wants to use the thick black gasket for the timing case cover. The thin blue gasket is for the 390 engine. Hope this helps someone in the future.

Bill A
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