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  #21  
Old 09-06-2012, 09:41 PM
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jopizz jopizz is offline
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I don't believe you can use those exhaust manifolds on your 59 anyway. The C3SE manifolds are different from the 58-60 manifolds. Has the block already been redone? Are the heads included? The manifold is worth a few bucks so that's a plus. If the block has already been done and you can just put it together then it sounds like a decent deal. If the block has to be done and you need oversize pistons, rings, etc. then it's probably going to cost the same to do your 352 so I don't see the advantage of putting out the extra $650.

John
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  #22  
Old 09-07-2012, 12:35 AM
gaffney1951 gaffney1951 is offline
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My first question would be is it standard bore. If yes, then not a bad price. Nice intake, the Carter carb is a little odd, but they function well, bunch of nice accessory components, and the flat top pistons are a plus. If its +.030 or more and requires anything more than a ball hone cleanup I would pass. Mike
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  #23  
Old 09-07-2012, 02:03 AM
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I think you're doing the right thing by presenting questions about your first engine build. This 390 has more than $600 in chrome, but be careful you don't build a pig in a poke. Building a 390 should be cheaper and easier than a 352, but this is an 'unknown' engine. What year is it?

My first concern is the castings. There is only one way to know if a block (or heads) are good. The block needs to be measured, completely torn down, cleaned, and magnafluxed. An engine machine shop can sonic test the cylinders to see if enough wall is left for boring.

Yes, it needs to be bored to the size of new pistons. I am looking at cylinders that are very smooth. That guarantees it is old, tired, and it burns oil.

A new cam is nice and they all cost about the same, but what grind is it? You need a cam to match the type of service you want your engine to produce. The same goes for new pistions; the compression ratio they are determines what octane you must burn.

No matter what engine you build, many choices must be addressed and your choices must suit your needs. Most all the components depend on each other as a total system. That's why a major overhaul will last far longer than patchwork. Today's components are FAR better than the offerings from the fifty's.

I always go back to the same questions when making choices; what do modern engines use? How do modern engines get 250,000 miles, when 'period' engines got 100,000 between rebuilds? These questions should affect your component choices. Otherwise, you will build an engine worthy of 1959 leaded gas and unobtainable oil full of zinc and phosphorus.

Finally, machine shop costs may seem high, but they will save you from building an engine that is cracked. The cost of materials are the same whether you do a good or faulty job. PLEASE ask as many questions as you need. - Dave
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  #24  
Old 09-12-2012, 11:05 PM
newbird59 newbird59 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by simplyconnected View Post
I think you're doing the right thing by presenting questions about your first engine build. This 390 has more than $600 in chrome, but be careful you don't build a pig in a poke. Building a 390 should be cheaper and easier than a 352, but this is an 'unknown' engine. What year is it?

My first concern is the castings. There is only one way to know if a block (or heads) are good. The block needs to be measured, completely torn down, cleaned, and magnafluxed. An engine machine shop can sonic test the cylinders to see if enough wall is left for boring.

Yes, it needs to be bored to the size of new pistons. I am looking at cylinders that are very smooth. That guarantees it is old, tired, and it burns oil.

A new cam is nice and they all cost about the same, but what grind is it? You need a cam to match the type of service you want your engine to produce. The same goes for new pistions; the compression ratio they are determines what octane you must burn.

No matter what engine you build, many choices must be addressed and your choices must suit your needs. Most all the components depend on each other as a total system. That's why a major overhaul will last far longer than patchwork. Today's components are FAR better than the offerings from the fifty's.

I always go back to the same questions when making choices; what do modern engines use? How do modern engines get 250,000 miles, when 'period' engines got 100,000 between rebuilds? These questions should affect your component choices. Otherwise, you will build an engine worthy of 1959 leaded gas and unobtainable oil full of zinc and phosphorus.

Finally, machine shop costs may seem high, but they will save you from building an engine that is cracked. The cost of materials are the same whether you do a good or faulty job. PLEASE ask as many questions as you need. - Dave
Thank you Dave for the information! I went ahead and struck a deal with the guy for the engine. The block is C6ME-A and is from a 66 thunderbird. If i'm not mistaken, I think that block code was for both 66 and 67.

The goal here for this purchase was to get a decent deal on a rebuildable engine. I'm going to replace almost everything that is on there already (although I might keep the chromed parts) so I'm not too worried on how it looks now. I have been keeping up on your 390 build and I actually have learned a lot from looking at the progress! Thank you for posting the photos as you go! I know that there are TONS of different intakes, heads, cams, lifters etc. but I need to start looking into what I want. The more and more that I look into the engine part of my bird, the more I want to beef it up. I don't want to race the thing but I do want something that will have the power. I guess you can say I want to have more than I need in the engine. I'm going to do my homework and get every last detail planned so that I can start on it in a few months as a winter project.

The cam is as follows...

Cam Lift Int. .280/Exh. .280
Valve Lift Int. .485/Exh. .485
Lobe ctrs. Int. 103/Exh. 119
Lash Hot Int. HYD/ Exh. HYD
Sae Dur. Int. 284/Exh. 284
.050 Dur Int. 208/Exh. 208
Sae Timing BTC 37 ABC 67 BBC 79 ATC 25
.050 Timing BTC 1 ABC 27 BBC 43 ATC -15

I'm not at all familiar with any of this lingo so...I'm lost. haha

P.s. Can I use the aluminum intake that I got with the motor? could I use the heads that are on my 352? How interchangable are the parts? The heads that I have on my 352 are coded C4AE-6090G and they both match.


David
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  #25  
Old 09-13-2012, 12:37 AM
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I hate putting good money after bad. So let's start at the beginning of every major overhaul. Before you start, is it your intention to save as much as you can? If so, you can tear down your block and bring it to a good engine machine shop.

FE engines are very different and don't build like GM engines. You need the help from EXPERIENCED Ford engine builders.

The block needs to be stripped to bare, then magnafluxed. If the casting is not good there is no sense in building it. This single operation will save you lots of money and aggravation.

Next, the bores must be measured and pistons purchased. Piston-to-cylinder clearance is around one half thousandth inch. Pistons aren't always available in all sizes so the buyer will find the closest size then the engine machine shop will bore to that piston.

Normally, the machine shop will have a set price for the above service. They will work with you if there are choices. I like hypereutectic alloy pistons because they transfer heat well and they aren't as expensive as forged pistons. Mustang 5.0 engines have used hypereutectic alloy pistons for over ten years. I also like moly rings. These components are part of the reason why modern engines last 250,000 miles.

Start by labeling baggies and putting the appropriate bolts in them as you go along. Take LOTS of pictures. - Dave
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