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  #21  
Old 04-07-2011, 12:55 AM
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simplyconnected simplyconnected is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by simplyconnected View Post
...I would like you to take the bottom plate off the pump and look closely at the rotors... Trouble comes when oil is sucked up to the pump before the filter, (which is how all engines work). Sometimes little pieces of metal get embedded in the pump rotors...
Remember this post? If you looked at the rotors, there would be no question as to why the drive shaft should be replaced and you would know why everyone agrees. (I think they're tapping into their own experiences to help you.)
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  #22  
Old 04-07-2011, 01:06 AM
redstangbob redstangbob is offline
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Well.....Sorry Gary, but your gonna goof David up. First, there is no nylon washer (see the exploded view supplied by Dave Dare). The distributor shaft just below the gear, rides in a bore that's machined in the block. That part of the block extends down a ways, then the shaft goes through to the pump. The clip or washer that goes on the pump shaft is made to stay in place. A new shaft will have the retainer in the correct location, and should be installed near the pump. The pump is then lifted into place with the shaft going up through the hole in the block until it goes into the bottom of the distributor. So to be clear, the retainer is closer to the pump, and if the distributor is removed and the shaft sticks in the distributor, the retainer (or clip) hits the bottom of the block boss and keeps the shaft in the pump and not in the pan. If I misunderstood your explanation, I apologize. Think of building an engine in a stand, with the block upside-down. The oil pump and shaft should be able to be installed without the shaft falling to the floor. Go to your shop manual for any questions. Trust me on this one, I've done this probably more than 50 times on just the FE block. Good luck, Bob C

PS: Why replace the shaft? because it's OLD & FATIGUED. Because they fail even if they're not 50 years old. My words will be ringing in your ears when you have to drop that pan again because of a failure. BTDT

Last edited by redstangbob : 04-07-2011 at 01:25 AM.
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  #23  
Old 04-07-2011, 01:55 AM
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I happen to have the shop manual which explains how to install the FE oil pump and shaft. It also explains how to adjust the stop for proper height. David, this stop never touches anything in normal operation, so it doesn't 'wear'.

INSTALLATION (from the oil pan side)
1. Position the oil pump drive shaft into the distributor socket. With the shaft firmly seated in the distributor socket, the stop on the shaft should touch the roof of the crankcase. Remove the shaft and position the stop as necessary.

2. Position a new gasket on the pump housing. With the stop properly positioned, insert the oil pump drive shaft into the oil pump. Install the pump and shaft as an assembly.

Do not attempt to force the pump into position if it will not seat readily. The drive shaft hex may be misaligned with the distributor shaft. To align, rotate the intermediate shaft into a new position.

Tighten the oilpump retaining screws to specifications.Swing the inlet pipe so it willclear the oil pan...
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  #24  
Old 04-07-2011, 08:24 AM
redstangbob redstangbob is offline
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Thanks for adding that Dave, You did what we all should do first, crack the book (they're really smart!) If any members here are trying to work on their cars without at least a shop manual, you're spinning your wheels. I made my living for over 30 years as a mechanic, the books were are best tools. If you're doing a restoration you should have 1)the shop manual for your car 2)the electrical manual and the body assy/trim manual 3)the VTCI OFS (original factory specs) manual and 4) a copy of the Ford master parts catalog on cd that covers your car. In fact I need one pre 1960, I've been looking into some earlier cars and don't have it yet. Good luck David, let us know how things turn out, Bob C
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  #25  
Old 04-07-2011, 08:41 AM
1946hamm 1946hamm is offline
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Sorry about any confusion about the nylon washer.

The nylon washer goes on the distributor shaft under the distributor gear and on top of the machined surface in the block. This nylon washer has nothing to do with the oil pump or oil pump shaft. If you ever pull the distributor out of the engine this nylon washer usually stays in the block and can be knocked off its resting place into the pan. I usually fish it out and use grease to hold it onto the distributor shaft upon re-instillation of the distributor.



Put the oil pump shaft in like the picture and it will be right. This is from the Ford manual.




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  #26  
Old 04-07-2011, 09:13 AM
redstangbob redstangbob is offline
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The nylon washer goes on the distributor shaft under the distributor gear and on top of the machined surface in the block.

Huh... I've never seen one
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  #27  
Old 04-07-2011, 11:57 AM
davidmij davidmij is offline
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Thx again ppl!
i do have the shop manual, but didn't look to the illustrations because I saw you guys post them here. That manual is great, just download it and print out any pages you're currently using to take out to the car. I did notice that the clip seemed to be on the pump end when I pulled it, but it dropped out when I pulled the pan so i wasn't absolutely sure. I feel better about it now. At most I'll be driving this car 100 miles a year until I rebuild the engine - it's just sitting in my driveway on blocks waiting for me to save up enough to do the brakes next, and a PCV set up on it. Then all the smoke will be behind me!
- Dave J
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  #28  
Old 04-07-2011, 12:16 PM
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The Victor o/h gasket set has a nylon washer in it, but it is for the drain plug. A little big for the nose of the dist gear, but it could be mistakenly installed there. I too have never seen a nylon washer used on the dist.
Carl
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