This will take you to the main site where there is history, technical information and other information on these cars.
This takes you back to the main page of the forums.
This is the control panel to change your password, information and preferences on this message board.
Click here if your lost your password or need to register on this message board. You must be a registered user to post. Registration is free.
Search this board for information you need.
Click here to buy cool Squarebirds mechandise.
Click here to support Squarebirds.org. For $20 annually receive 20mBytes webspace, a Squarebirds e-mail address and member's icon on the message board.
  #11  
Old 10-20-2010, 03:23 AM
simplyconnected's Avatar
simplyconnected simplyconnected is online now
Slow Typist
 
Join Date: May 26 2009
Posts: 7,161
simplyconnected is on a distinguished road
Default

Doug, there are standard 'checks' you can do to determine the age of your engine.

Get a pad of paper and draw a line down the middle. On the LH column going down, write 5,6,7,8. On the RH column going down, write 1,2,3,4. This is a graphic display of your engine. Take your compression readings for each cylinder and record the results.

Compression numbers can be high or low, as long as the numbers are spread close. If the numbers spread wide, a smooth engine is impossible to attain. Check Advance Auto for their free tool loaner program for a compression checker.

Timing Chain: Pull your distributor cap off. Put your timing marks anywhere in the middle. Use a wrench and a long handle on the damper pulley. As you move the crankshaft back and forth, see how many degrees you can go before the distributor rotor starts moving. This test will determine timing set slop.

FE engines are VERY common. They came in different varieties for different applications, but all of your components are pretty standard except the cam. Ford made a thrust plate change in '63. I strongly suggest you buy a '63 and up cam an drill your block for the new thrust plate. Timing sets are much cheaper for these cams AND you can get a 'true roller' chain set.

Most FE engines are very similar, so take a look at this 428 page:
http://www.7litre.org/Rebuildrecommend.html
__________________
My latest project:
CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

"We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
--Lee Iacocca
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 10-20-2010, 08:56 AM
Rigormortor's Avatar
Rigormortor Rigormortor is offline
Experienced
 
Join Date: Mar 5 2010
Posts: 114
Rigormortor is on a distinguished road
Default

Good advice on the compression checks.... the fact that when you replaced the freeze out plug and it was a mess inside tells me the engine more than likely was not rebuilt and probaly is the original mileage. The compression check will tell you more if you have 130-150 then it might have been rebuilt. With 152K you would probably have 110-125 on the compression.
__________________
On Cardomain - http://www.cardomain.com/ride/3841411
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 10-20-2010, 12:26 PM
jopizz's Avatar
jopizz jopizz is offline
Excellent Auto Mechanic for over 40 years.
 
Join Date: Nov 23 2009
Posts: 4,881
jopizz is on a distinguished road
Default

Doug,

Here's what I did with mine. I also didn't have the $1500-2000 to do a complete rebuild. After checking the cylinders with a micrometer and being comfortable that I didn't need to rehone them I just deglazed them with a honing stone. I then installed a new crankshaft and bearings. Mine was too far gone; cost $250. Fel-Pro gasket set; $55. New oil pump and rod $35. Freeze plugs $5. Timing chain; $20. New moly rings; $45. The cam and gears as well as the lifters were all in good shape so I reused them. After talking to the local machine shop and telling him how few miles I would put on the car he didn't see any reason to redo the heads. I ground down the seats and valves and installed the new seals from the kit. The only other expense was a couple of the rod bushings had to be replaced; $40. The engine runs smooth as silk with no smoke and is a solid 20 on the vacuum gauge. I believe mine had around 85K when I redid it. Even if something goes wrong the only big expense is the crank which I can always use over again. I wouldn't recommend it for everyone but it worked for me. I used lots of CLR and water to clean out the cooling passages which were loaded with rust and scale.

John
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 10-20-2010, 03:34 PM
simplyconnected's Avatar
simplyconnected simplyconnected is online now
Slow Typist
 
Join Date: May 26 2009
Posts: 7,161
simplyconnected is on a distinguished road
Default

John, I gotta ask...
What wiped out your crank, and what was up with your wrist pin bushings? Sounds like lack of oil flow (or coolant got into your oil).

Usually, if a crank is worn or scored (tapered, etc), the main and pin bearings can be ground. Bearing sets come in different sizes to suit the new grind.

I was just wondering. - Dave
__________________
My latest project:
CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

"We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
--Lee Iacocca
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 10-20-2010, 05:10 PM
jopizz's Avatar
jopizz jopizz is offline
Excellent Auto Mechanic for over 40 years.
 
Join Date: Nov 23 2009
Posts: 4,881
jopizz is on a distinguished road
Default

It's hard to say what caused all the trouble. When I got the car the engine was seized and had been sitting for 18 years. The oil pump rod was broken in half so I suspect the pump locked up. Between lack of oil and rust from sitting so long the crank was in bad shape. Maybe it could've been ground down but after checking with a few machine shops it was cheaper to get a crank kit with the fitted bearings. For some reason a couple of the wrist pin bushings were a lot more worn than the others.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 10-23-2010, 03:37 PM
dgs's Avatar
dgs dgs is offline
Super-Experienced
 
Join Date: Feb 13 2003
Posts: 921
dgs is on a distinguished road
Default

Lots of good advice here folks, thanks. There's a part of me that is itching to do the rebuild so I'll know it's good. If I had the $$ and a better garage, I my jump on it. I also want the experience of tearing a motor apart myself and putting it back together.

When spring comes again, I'll dig in and see what's up. I rally want to be able to drive her longer than the 25-50 miles one way that I'd feel comfortable doing now. Dad's in Toledo, about 125 miles each way, and it'd be neat to have my '60 and his '56 together for a cruise in or a show. I'm not quite comfortable trying to go that far with it yet.
__________________
DGS (aka salguod)
1960 Convertible - Raven Black, Red leather
www.salguod.net
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 10-23-2010, 06:03 PM
simplyconnected's Avatar
simplyconnected simplyconnected is online now
Slow Typist
 
Join Date: May 26 2009
Posts: 7,161
simplyconnected is on a distinguished road
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dgs View Post
...I also want the experience of tearing a motor apart myself and putting it back together...
Doug, in my experience, after you do one, you will do more. The feeling you get running your own rebuild is so rewarding... you will forget about all the hours and money you invested, and the engine is truly yours because a part of YOU is built into it. - Dave
__________________
My latest project:
CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

"We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
--Lee Iacocca
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:52 PM.

Driving, racing or working on cars can be hazardous. The procedures and advice on this website including the message board are opinion only. Squarebirds.org and its webmasters and contributors do not guarantee the correctness of the advice and procedures. The Squarebirds.org and its webmasters assume no liability for any damage, fines, punishment, injury or death resulting from following these procedures or advice. If you do not have the skills or tools to repair your car, please consult a professional. By using this site you agree to hold harmless the Squarebirds.org, its authors and its webmasters from any resulting claim and costs that may occur from using the information found on this site.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Any submissions to this site and any post on this site becomes property of Squarebirds.org . The webmasters reserve the right to edit and modify any submissions to this site. All material on this is site is copyrighted by the Squarebirds.org. Reproduction by any means other than for personal use is strictly prohibited. Permission to use material on this site can be obtained by contacting the webmasters. Copyright 2002-2016 by Squarebirds.org.