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  #11  
Old 07-10-2010, 08:21 AM
vernz vernz is offline
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After reading the string on oil and the need for zinc last year I switched to 20W-50. I found Valvoline VR-1 racing oil that has an added label that says "High Zinc, Great for push-rod & flat tappet engines". I've also been looking around for rebuild kits for the oil pump, but no luck yet. One thing I will look for in the oil pan is plastic timing gear teeth. If I find those I will expand the work I plan to do for now.

Vern
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  #12  
Old 07-10-2010, 09:41 AM
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Howard Prout Howard Prout is offline
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One of the things you may want to consider, given that you are going to remove the oil pan, is whether or not you want a working vacuum pump. If so, then check to see if your engine currently has a vacuum pump and if so, how well is it working? There should be a vacuum check valve on the left side of the engine block just above the lower edge of the block near the mid point. The vacuum pump should produce about 20" of vacuum at 2000 rpm. If it produces less than this, then you may want to consider rebuilding the vaccum pump (see the thread on rebuilding a 430 vacuum pump). If the engine does not have a vacuum pump, then you may want to consider installing one. My experience is that even when they are working to specs, they aren't all that effective, especially after the oil gets hot. The one in my engine produces up to 25" vacuum when cold but that drops to about 10-12" when hot. If you are going to install a vacuum pump in an engine that doesn't have one, you need a longer drive shaft from the distributor and the tube from the vacuum pump to the engine block.
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  #13  
Old 07-10-2010, 11:02 AM
vernz vernz is offline
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The vacuum wipers on my '60 work great, so I'm sure it's in there. Your picture reminded me of another question - In the past I've seen recommendations to replace the oil pump drive shaft with one that is more robust. What is the thought on that?

Vern
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  #14  
Old 07-10-2010, 12:51 PM
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Originally Posted by vernz View Post

Your picture reminded me of another question - In the past I've seen recommendations to replace the oil pump drive shaft with one that is more robust. What is the thought on that?

Vern
There has been numerous discussions on the drive upgrade. Here is one from LINC FORUM-

Quote:
Originally Posted by ReijerLincoln

In addition to the oil pump; replace your original oil pump drive shaft with this billet drive shaft from Precision Oil Pumps in Ca, (559)325-3553.

The original is literally as thin as a pencil and really isn't up to the job.

This replacement works for the MEL engines. It is an FE drive that is +.0375" Longer for Main Girdle Applications. This shaft is about .075 too long, but the MEL guys get them and grind that amount off the bottom (pump end) to make them fit. Just use a bench grinder. The shafts are $20.00 plus shipping.

Cleaning out the oil pick-up tube and mesh + the oil pan is a good idea too.




This modification is for the later MEL FE pump upgrade. The drive on the oil/vacuum pump is a different length (correct me if I am wrong please).
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  #15  
Old 07-10-2010, 03:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vernz View Post

After reading the string on oil and the need for zinc last year I switched to 20W-50. I found Valvoline VR-1 racing oil that has an added label that says "High Zinc, Great for push-rod & flat tappet engines". I've also been looking around for rebuild kits for the oil pump, but no luck yet. One thing I will look for in the oil pan is plastic timing gear teeth. If I find those I will expand the work I plan to do for now.

Vern
Just a reminder. Racing oil is not meant for street useage, especially at that viscosity rating. Racing oil does not have the additive and dispersant packages as does regular engine oil.

EGGE MACHINE AND SPEED lists a new oil pump that is unique to the vacuum pump equipped cars 1958-1960 (or they can reman yours).

PN P-312
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  #16  
Old 07-10-2010, 05:31 PM
vernz vernz is offline
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I actually wasn't looking for racing oil, but one of the posts last year on what oil to use concluded that modern 20W50 oil came closest to the viscosity of the straight 30W oil that the engine was designed to run on. I was convinced in that post to use 20W 50 and when I saw that the Valvoline oil boasted of having extra zinc I was sold. I actually didn't realize it was "racing" oil until I took out the container for this string. I have some of the zinc additive so I'll go back to non-racing oil and add the zinc. Also, I purchased one of the billet oil pump drive shafts for my 59. Even thought I talked to the people and told them it was for a 430 MEL, the shaft I received was inches too short. I never bothered sending back. Anyone need a 352 billet oil pump shaft?

Vern
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  #17  
Old 07-10-2010, 05:45 PM
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Vernon, I hope your oil pan job goes smoothly. I figured you'd do it this weekend and I wish you good luck. Don't get hung up on all the side jobs and improvements. I understand you will overhaul your engine soon, so a good thorough cleaning is all you need until then.

I didn't intend on getting sidetracked with a discussion about oil, pump driveshafts, and seafoam.

When you pull your pan and wash everything, I'm sure you will know what needs to be done. 99% of any restoration is 'cleanup', and I'm proud that you're doing this job for yourself instead of hiring someone who is trying to beat a clock.

Take note of oil pump wear. If you see pieces of metal embedded in the gears, you will immediately know how much stress the pump driveshaft went through (and if anything should be changed). A standard OEM driveshaft got you this far and they usually cost around six bucks. ARP wants three times as much, but all driveshafts are bigger than the weakest link; that tiny rollpin that holds the distributor gear on.

I hope everything goes well, my friend. - Dave Dare
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  #18  
Old 07-10-2010, 06:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vernz View Post

I actually wasn't looking for racing oil, but one of the posts last year on what oil to use concluded that modern 20W50 oil came closest to the viscosity of the straight 30W oil that the engine was designed to run on.

Vern
Depending on how a HI-PO engine is built, 50W (final weight or straight weight) is norm. That is the final weight of a multi-grade 20W-50. Cold start and the viscosity is 20W, and this allows an easier start and lubrication whereas a straight weight 50 makes for hard cranking and slow lubrication. When a certain engine temp is reached, it becomes 50, heavy enough to lube the larger clearances on a race only engine but much too heavy for a street engine (close tolerances).

10W-30 (or 40) works in the same fashion. You want immediate lubrication on a cold start and as the engine warms full protection.
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  #19  
Old 07-10-2010, 07:31 PM
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I have used 20-50 weight in just about every car I've ever had with no problems. (maybe if I was in northern Alaska it might be different.)

When the motor is cold it is no thicker than 20 weight would be at that temperature.
When the motor is hot it is no thinner than 50 weight would be at that temperature

The best of both worlds.

I change it every three thousand miles and change the oil filter at the same time.

The 1970 429 Ford in my F100 had had a hard time over the years including some drag-racing etc and has at least 130,000 miles on it.
Yet when fully warmed up still has 55psi oil pressure at 2,5000rpm, when really hot and idling it drops to 30-35psi.

When starting on a frosty morning it does jump up to just over 60psi for the first 15 minutes or so.

BTW: I modified the pan to hold 7 quarts.
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