This will take you to the main site where there is history, technical information and other information on these cars.
This takes you back to the main page of the forums.
This is the control panel to change your password, information and preferences on this message board.
Click here if your lost your password or need to register on this message board. You must be a registered user to post. Registration is free.
Search this board for information you need.
Click here to buy cool Squarebirds mechandise.
Click here to support Squarebirds.org. For $20 annually receive 20mBytes webspace, a Squarebirds e-mail address and member's icon on the message board.
  #1  
Old 02-12-2018, 02:33 AM
mh434's Avatar
mh434 mh434 is offline
Experienced
 
Join Date: Jan 10 2017
Posts: 101
mh434 is on a distinguished road
Default Transmission cooler

Morning all
Anyone seen a transmission cooler setup like this before ?
Fluid flows to the ally box in the top right of the first photo and then from that into the toilet brush arrangement that sits infront of the radiator, then back to the transmission. (flow might be the other way round). Close up of the first bit shows it is manufactured by Airesearch. Unfortunately the part numbers are not readable as someone has rather crudely engraved "FOR ENG USE ONLY" and the part number on it. The car was originally from Arizona so could this be an attempt at improving the transmission cooling ?

Jon
Attached Images
File Type: jpg tc-1.jpg (133.8 KB, 105 views)
File Type: jpg tc-2.jpg (136.6 KB, 106 views)
File Type: jpg tc-3.jpg (139.7 KB, 106 views)
__________________
Jon
Deepest Hertfordshire
Old enough to know I'm right...
1960 Hardtop T'bird
1961 Hotchkiss M201
Ex-Army Land Rover
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 02-12-2018, 08:20 AM
Derbird Derbird is offline
Apprentice
 
Join Date: Jul 10 2016
Posts: 41
Derbird is on a distinguished road
Default

I have seen similar, but not that brand. I would guess that is an engineering prototype based on the engraving. Due to the condition of the fins on the front cooler I would probably put it on a shelf and find a new one.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 02-12-2018, 12:08 PM
Frango100's Avatar
Frango100 Frango100 is offline
Experienced
 
Join Date: May 2 2016
Posts: 403
Frango100 is on a distinguished road
Default

The Airesearch heat exchanger seems to be an aviation part. A pitty that the P/N can´t be read anymore.
The cooling tubes with the fins up front should cool down the fluid quite well, at least as long as there was an airflow passing around it. When standing still there would be very little cooling, but there would also not be a lot of heating of the fluid.
__________________
Frank
1958 T-Bird "Trovão Rosa" - "Rose Thunder"
Thunderbird registry #61670
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 02-12-2018, 06:33 PM
simplyconnected's Avatar
simplyconnected simplyconnected is offline
Slow Typist
 
Join Date: May 26 2009
Posts: 7,399
simplyconnected is on a distinguished road
Default

I only use a trans cooler when absolutely necessary, like if you change from a stick to an automatic or if you use a radical stall converter that is designed to slip at low-med rpms. Otherwise, the radiator successfully performs these functions:
  • It heats transmission fluid in cold weather,
  • It keeps trans fluid temp consistent as engine coolant is regulated by the thermostat.
  • It also keeps the trans fluid level low in the system.
__________________
My latest project:
CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

"We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
--Lee Iacocca
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 02-13-2018, 01:45 AM
mh434's Avatar
mh434 mh434 is offline
Experienced
 
Join Date: Jan 10 2017
Posts: 101
mh434 is on a distinguished road
Default

Dave
That's a very good point you make about the trans fluid getting warmed by the radiator. Maybe in Arizona the external transmission cooler was required, but here in the UK presumably the trans fluid is never going to get to working temperature. The radiator looks to be in good condition, maybe I will look at reconnecting the transmission lines to it when it comes to the rebuild.
Jon
__________________
Jon
Deepest Hertfordshire
Old enough to know I'm right...
1960 Hardtop T'bird
1961 Hotchkiss M201
Ex-Army Land Rover
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 02-13-2018, 09:54 AM
simplyconnected's Avatar
simplyconnected simplyconnected is offline
Slow Typist
 
Join Date: May 26 2009
Posts: 7,399
simplyconnected is on a distinguished road
Default

Jon, I live in Michigan where our winter temps commonly fall well below freezing (like right now). This doesn't affect our classic cars because they are put to bed for the season but our daily drivers, which these cars formerly were, get very sluggish. Robin always starts her car and lets it run for ten minutes before climbing in for work.

Our bitter cold diminishes battery power, oil gets thick, engines start slower and automatic transmissions don't shift quite right. The cooling system works both ways, to help heat and to cool both the engine and automatic trans.

As a side note, I investigated our Motorcraft oil filters and how they operate. The bypass valve opens at ten PSI. That means, when oil is cold and viscous, the filter simply opens to allow all oil to bypass. For this reason, I change the oil at 3,000 miles because that is the real filtration.

When Ford cars left the factory they were designed to operate in all weather conditions across the USA. I don't recall an option for a transmission cooler. Some cars had a 'trailer package' which included a larger battery and radiator but I don't recall ever seeing a separate transmission cooler. - Dave
__________________
My latest project:
CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

"We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
--Lee Iacocca
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 02-13-2018, 09:53 PM
scumdog's Avatar
scumdog scumdog is offline
Super-Experienced
 
Join Date: May 12 2006
Posts: 1,393
scumdog is on a distinguished road
Default

I run a mechanical temp gauge in my F100, the sender is screwed into a fitting on the side of the C6 pan.

I also run two coolers, the reason for that is because I screwed up the mounting position of the original cooler and it ended up not being sufficiently in the air stream.
And it was easier to fit the 2nd cooler than remove the first one and refit it.

The second cooler is on front of the radiator and is about 13" X 7"

The first one is larger.

Even with this set-up you should see the temp of the trans-fluid after a long uphill with overtaking slower vehicles..

And even in summer NZ rarely gets to 100F.

Google a chart that shows trans fluid temperature vs trans fluid 'life expectancy'.
Food for thought.
__________________
A Thunderbirder from the Land of the Long White Cloud.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 02-14-2018, 07:45 AM
Dakota Boy's Avatar
Dakota Boy Dakota Boy is offline
Super-Experienced
 
Join Date: Jun 30 2009
Posts: 1,519
Dakota Boy is on a distinguished road
Default

Hew Scumdog, what temps are you seeing on your gauge?

I also have a C6; a 2800-3000 stall converter, and a trans cooler in front of the radiator that is about the same size as yours.

I do not have a trans temp gauge. My trans fluid does not enter the radiator like the OEM setup.

thanks
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 02-14-2018, 11:09 AM
pbf777 pbf777 is offline
Experienced
 
Join Date: Jan 9 2016
Posts: 216
pbf777 is on a distinguished road
Default

Keep in mind that the sum of fluid being pumped thru the cooler circuit is only a portion of the total fluid volume in use, and therefore it is possible to tax this cooling capacity, no matter how large or how many heat exchangers may be employed (within the original fluid circuit).

For severe applications, the only recourse is to implement a completely unique system from that provided by the O.E.M.; consisting of pump, feed lines, heat exchanger, thermostatic controls, etc., accessing and returning directly to the sump volume.

Also, just to clarify, the bypass valve within the engines' oil filter (if equipped), opens based on a pressure differential value between the unfiltered vs. filtered sides of the filter element, not P.S.I. as displayed on your vehicles' gauge.

Scott.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 02-15-2018, 09:24 AM
JohnG's Avatar
JohnG JohnG is offline
John
 
Join Date: Jul 28 2003
Posts: 2,256
JohnG is on a distinguished road
Default

Also, just to clarify, the bypass valve within the engines' oil filter (if equipped), opens based on a pressure differential value between the unfiltered vs. filtered sides of the filter element, not P.S.I. as displayed on your vehicles' gauge.

Scott, thank you. Been wondering about that . . .

john
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:27 PM.

Driving, racing or working on cars can be hazardous. The procedures and advice on this website including the message board are opinion only. Squarebirds.org and its webmasters and contributors do not guarantee the correctness of the advice and procedures. The Squarebirds.org and its webmasters assume no liability for any damage, fines, punishment, injury or death resulting from following these procedures or advice. If you do not have the skills or tools to repair your car, please consult a professional. By using this site you agree to hold harmless the Squarebirds.org, its authors and its webmasters from any resulting claim and costs that may occur from using the information found on this site.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Any submissions to this site and any post on this site becomes property of Squarebirds.org . The webmasters reserve the right to edit and modify any submissions to this site. All material on this is site is copyrighted by the Squarebirds.org. Reproduction by any means other than for personal use is strictly prohibited. Permission to use material on this site can be obtained by contacting the webmasters. Copyright 2002-2016 by Squarebirds.org.