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  #51  
Old 11-06-2017, 08:28 PM
OX1 OX1 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jopizz View Post
Read this thread, post #6. Carl explains it perfectly.

http://squarebirds.org/vbulletin/sho...=tire+mounting

John
Oh I see. Has nothing to do with stiffer wheel.
The undercut on a T-bird rim is 1-3/4 below rim edge on
outward side, and 1-1/4 below rim edge on inner side.
Does make mounting easier on inner edge of rim, but not
impossible the other way.

What lazy (or in-experinced) tire machine operators do
(or don't do), is get the bead below this lip, far enough
around the rim to get enough clearance on the side of rim
that bead is being forced over. Sometimes you need
120 degrees of bead (or more) below this lip...........

It's certainly not an issue with a tall floppy sidewall,
non performance type tire. Want to talk about a
nightmare install.

305/35R18 with a 3" lip (deep dish "Bullet" style rims)
to overcome. Took 3 of us and 2 crow bars.

http://luxjo.supermotors.net/MUSTANG...723_191433.jpg

http://luxjo.supermotors.net/MUSTANG...723_191403.jpg

http://luxjo.supermotors.net/MUSTANG...723_192821.jpg

At least those were drag radials, which had a little
softer sidewall. My daily driver tires on my stang are
a 295/40R18 NT05 road course tire (same style/size
rim) and they were even worse to mount. I honestly
don't think I could get them back off off with out
cutting the bead off.

http://luxjo.supermotors.net/MUSTANG...5/IMG_1209.JPG
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  #52  
Old 11-07-2017, 05:19 PM
Deanj Deanj is offline
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So after a couple discussions with Coker, they offered a new tire shipped free for $133.50. That still means I would have to find a new installer who will charge about $20 to install.

Decisions, decisions.

I can go with this deal or forget the whole thing and take my chances for a few years, and then buy a set of Diamondbacks.

Do I feel lucky?

Dean
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  #53  
Old 11-07-2017, 06:15 PM
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If it matters to you to have a spare that matches I would take the deal and use the damaged tire as a spare. If it doesn't matter then I would put the damaged tire in the rear and take my chances. I would still go after the installer for damages.

John
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  #54  
Old 11-08-2017, 12:09 PM
Deanj Deanj is offline
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Done. I accepted Coker's offer. BTW, the Coker Classic wide white is a Michelin tire mold made in Mexico.

Interesting that I'm placing a matching spare with a checkered history in place of one that doesn't. Oh well, in a couple years one of the tires on the car will become the next spare. I can even keep the current spare sucking up valuable space-in my garage.

I'll write to my shop and tell them of Coker's conclusions. I'll posture this in such a way as to suggest a solution to the damage.

The Coker rep is actually researching local installers who know how to mount these tires on our Ford 14" wheel. That's good plus it places Coker back into the fold if something goes wrong with the mounting.

Dean

Edit: As I predicted the shop denied any wrongdoing here. They stated the bead didn't have any gouges typical of incorrect mounting and therefore they suspect a defective tire. I could ask them to turn this over to their insurance carrier, but I'm just through with this-and them.

I just checked the tire because it looked different and the leak has returned. So much for matching spare. Well, at least I didn't start cleaning up the current spare tire wheel. I can leave it in the trunk, and scrap the Coker.

Last edited by Deanj : 11-08-2017 at 02:53 PM.
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  #55  
Old 11-08-2017, 02:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OX1 View Post
...My daily driver tires on my stang are a 295/40R18 NT05 road course tire (same style/size rim) and they were even worse to mount. I honestly don't think I could get them back off off with out cutting the bead off...
Huh??? Ford mounts five tires in less than one minute to match line speed.

That really means, the correct tire is matched with the correct wheel, the tire rotation direction is correct for each side of the car (V, Z and W rated tires are directional), the stem is inserted, tire is mounted, inflated and the whole assembly is balanced. Then, all five tires are placed on a conveyor in the correct order so the right tire is delivered to the correct assembler on each side of the assembly line. BTW, the trunk's spare is rotated between assemblers.

This is repeated every day (800 cars times five tires equals) 4,000 times. That's right, each assembly plant goes through 4,000 tires, wheels and valve stems per day. How many does your tire store go through in a month?

Ford doesn't have time for guys with crowbars to mount tires. Tire mounting is done behind a safety screen with NO human intervention. The rim or the tire never rotate, the rim is 'face up' and there is never a blemish left on the tire or rim.

The assembler on each side of the line works while the line is moving. He loads his air wrench with lug nuts, rolls a tire onto the spindle and hangs it on five studs then offers the wrench to the studs. The spindle orientations are random so the torque wrench must rotate before aligning with the studs. In one minute, the spare is in the trunk and all four feet have correct shoes, all laced properly.

Did you ever figure how much each tire costs to assemble and mount? Let's put this in perspective. Go to your tire store and offer them two dollars per tire to insert a new stem, mount, balance, inflate and install new tires on your car. Believe me, when you buy a new car you get a fantastic deal. - Dave
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  #56  
Old 11-11-2017, 11:21 AM
Deanj Deanj is offline
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New tire arrived yesterday and I went to a local Firestone dealer at 3 pm for installation. Coker talked to Firestone in advance and felt the dealership could mount the tire properly. Firestone said they couldn't get the tire to "pop" and hold the bead perhaps because the tire was cold. It's now 10:30am Saturday and they still can't mount the tire.

Another issue cited by Firestone is the stiffness of a tall tire. I recall this 75 series profile tire as pretty much an every day size in the 1980's. Do I need to switch to 70 series next time around assuming this tire gets mounted eventually, or buy solid rubber tires?

Dean
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  #57  
Old 11-11-2017, 12:05 PM
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I've never seen any shop have issues mounting 75 series tires. My local garage up the street mounts them for me all the time with just a basic tire machine. Almost every tire manufacturer still makes 75 series tires so why should it be an issue? I've also had them done at Walmart so that tells you it doesn't take any special skill. I think you are dealing with morons to tell you the truth.

John
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  #58  
Old 11-11-2017, 12:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deanj View Post
New tire arrived yesterday and I went to a local Firestone dealer at 3 pm for installation. Coker talked to Firestone in advance and felt the dealership could mount the tire properly. Firestone said they couldn't get the tire to "pop" and hold the bead perhaps because the tire was cold. It's now 10:30am Saturday and they still can't mount the tire.

Another issue cited by Firestone is the stiffness of a tall tire. I recall this 75 series profile tire as pretty much an every day size in the 1980's. Do I need to switch to 70 series next time around assuming this tire gets mounted eventually, or buy solid rubber tires?

Dean
I live in a town of a bit over 4,000 people on the other side of the world and I use a local tyre shop and have never had issues getting tyres fitted to any rims ranging from the standard T-bird rims to rims 10" wide and of a variety of profile tyres so I can't see why you should be having these issues.
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  #59  
Old 11-11-2017, 01:31 PM
Deanj Deanj is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jopizz View Post
I've never seen any shop have issues mounting 75 series tires. My local garage up the street mounts them for me all the time with just a basic tire machine. Almost every tire manufacturer still makes 75 series tires so why should it be an issue? I've also had them done at Walmart so that tells you it doesn't take any special skill. I think you are dealing with morons to tell you the truth.

John
Maybe I should have gone to Walmart. This is ridiculous, but I'm glad Coker talked to them first and told me to contact this Firestone. That puts them on the line if these goof balls damage the tire. It's now 12:35 pm and they've said they're trying to "widen the bead". I'm calling Coker.

Dean
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  #60  
Old 11-11-2017, 02:58 PM
Joe Johnston Joe Johnston is offline
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Cant believe they don't have a band that goes around the tread and draws up tight to expand the tire to the wheel with air pressure. We changed them by hand on the farm and used a rope around the tire and drew it up tight by twisting a big screw driver. No problem. Squeezed the sides out quickly.

Everyone today has gotten into the habit of mounting tires with the "pretty side" of the wheel up so not to scratch anything. Beyond that, they don't think and some places are clueless. I stopped at an old tire shop and asked about mounting my wire wheels and tubes then balancing them "stud centric" . The guy at the desk said they never heard of that and all wheels are tubeless, but an old timer said "Hell YES"! Would be fun since he hadn't changed a tube for years!!!

Just have to find the right place to get work done.
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