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  #71  
Old 09-16-2017, 11:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by simplyconnected
As long as Americans keep buying Chinese goods, these companies aren't stupid, they will continue to produce the stuff we buy.
Absolutely correct!!!

I know we're off topic here, but this needs emphasizing until it is understood by the ignorant!

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  #72  
Old 09-17-2017, 08:58 AM
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When i had to buy a waterpump for my Jeep, i could get one made in China directly here in Brazil, but i bought one via Rockauto from an "American" brand. I was quite surprised that when it arrived, it stated " made in China" on the box.
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  #73  
Old 09-17-2017, 09:04 AM
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Ok, back on topic: the differential third member is complete and put back in the housing. The differential is loosly installed under the bird and just will need a bit more time to be finished. Will be traveling to Holland tomorrow, so expect to be able to test it after my return, in about a week.
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  #74  
Old 09-24-2017, 10:28 PM
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So today had some time to finish the differential installation and test drive the bird. No more noises from the differential and a very comfortable rear suspension.
With the weight on the wheels, the rear suspension clappers are much more closed than they where before (the vertical clapper bolts and rubbers are not installed). It all drives very well, i only hear some noise from both clapper ends touching each other when the bird comes down after a traffic bump. So at least some rubber should be between the clapper ends to prevent this noise.
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  #75  
Old 09-24-2017, 10:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frango100 View Post
...i only hear some noise from both clapper ends touching each other when the bird comes down after a traffic bump. So at least some rubber should be between the clapper ends to prevent this noise.
With all due respect, if I had a '58 T-bird, I would get a torch and cut those clappers off completely. All they accomplish is to restrict freedom of motion which is what you don't want. Furthermore, they transfer torque to the upper control arms! Again, something you don't want.

So for now, you have your proof. This explains why no other trailing arm suspension uses 'clappers', across all car lines and models. - Dave
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  #76  
Old 09-25-2017, 12:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by simplyconnected View Post
With all due respect, if I had a '58 T-bird, I would get a torch and cut those clappers off completely. Dave
Originally Posted by Frango100
I don´t think that it will work well without the vertical clapper bolt installed. The axle is hinged to the lower control arm, so when you accelerate, the differential will rotate backwards.................
The differential will rotate forward during braking,
So there should be some medium in between the clapper ends to restrict the clapper movement, but still to give it some room to move during suspension movement.

Always give sufficient consideration to the original engineering intent prior to discarding such; as you are now, the new "engineer"!

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  #77  
Old 09-25-2017, 01:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frango100 View Post
...With the weight on the wheels, the rear suspension clappers are much more closed than they where before (the vertical clapper bolts and rubbers are not installed). It all drives very well, i only hear some noise from both clapper ends touching each other when the bird comes down after a traffic bump. So at least some rubber should be between the clapper ends to prevent this noise.
This is a different story from, "The axle is hinged to the lower control arm, so when you accelerate, the differential will rotate backwards.................
The differential will rotate forward during braking,.."

Neither of us engineered such a screwed-up system. We did learn that the rear axle has four hinges on each side in a parallelogram, not just one hinge. We also learned that 'rolling' is a product of the control arms as the axle moves freely in its range.

Since weight distribution causes the nose to dive and the rear end to lift, naturally there will be some roll because the upper and lower control arms are different lengths. The same happens with the front suspension's control arms.

Frank now has his proof through trial and error. I believe his original apprehension has changed quite a bit. 'Seeing's believing' in this story. Mechanics can visualize the system on paper before it happens. I am baffled that this got passed by Ford Engineers. I'm sure the powers that be had lots of questions for the Mechanical Engineering and Product Development Dept's., over this one. - Dave
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