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  #21  
Old 06-12-2017, 10:05 AM
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DKheld DKheld is offline
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Got lucky on my engine (for a change) - no paperwork but the guy seemed honest enough - probably not the norm these days but I took a chance. Before I installed it I used a bore scope and could see the new .020 over pistons, correct hashing on the cyl walls, valve train looked new under the valve covers etc.

So far it has worked out - hate to hear yours was not so great.

As far as value......

Comes up a lot on my MG forum. The early MG's had the engine number stamped on the VIN plate so if the car is to be a show car it makes a BIG difference in value to have the original engine. Probably as much as 25% of the value of the car - HOWEVER - the plates on the engine can be re-produced so someone "could" create a numbers matching car. I've seen MG's go for 2x what any other car of the same condition would fetch but the seller had a documented paper trail on all the components.

My Tbird for example. Bought new by my Dad and Mom. I do have a lot of the original documentation from when the car was bought new and never have seen the engine number recorded on any of it. Don't think the FE engines even have a serial number??? just a date code. My engine has been changed. You can't tell it's not the OEM 352 without looking at the date code numbers on the block. In a show judges might look for that sort of thing so once again - if the car was to be shown it would matter.

Even though the engine numbers are not recorded (that I know of - even on my build sheet) it still would make a slight difference IMHO. If someone bought your car and wanted to make a show car out of it they would have to factor in finding a correct engine for the car, rebuilding and installing. Maybe 10-25% of the value?

Heck - even on my OEM engine the intake number is a '61 production number. I'm 99.9% sure it was never changed but it would be hard to prove. Judges would probably count off points for the '61 intake on a '60 car (until it was proven that late production '60 Tbirds were fitted with early '61 parts - which is what I believe happened).

On the other hand if a fellow wanted it to drive. A rebuilt FE might be a plus to that buyer (original type engine not necessarily the original one)

An then for the street rod buyer - he might love to see a modern fuel injected Lincoln Navigator engine in there and would not pay as much for the OEM style FE engine in it.

All a big gamble really and depends on the buyer. I'd say if you have what you think is the OEM engine and can keep it to sell with the car that's what I would do. If the buyer doesn't care about it then you can just sell it.

JMHO

Eric
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  #22  
Old 06-12-2017, 10:11 AM
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StealthSRT10 StealthSRT10 is offline
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That had crossed my mind. Just to reassemble the origional on the engine stand.

Hopefully parting out the extra engine i bought isnt what i have to do.

Either way. What is the order i should buy my parts in.

Like i believe i need to buy over sized pistons and the shop will have to machine to the piston.

How does eveyone feel about the "engine rebuild kits"?

Quote:
Originally Posted by DKheld View Post
Got lucky on my engine (for a change) - no paperwork but the guy seemed honest enough - probably not the norm these days but I took a chance. Before I installed it I used a bore scope and could see the new .020 over pistons, correct hashing on the cyl walls, valve train looked new under the valve covers etc.

So far it has worked out - hate to hear yours was not so great.

As far as value......

Comes up a lot on my MG forum. The early MG's had the engine number stamped on the VIN plate so if the car is to be a show car it makes a BIG difference in value to have the original engine. Probably as much as 25% of the value of the car - HOWEVER - the plates on the engine can be re-produced so someone "could" create a numbers matching car. I've seen MG's go for 2x what any other car of the same condition would fetch but the seller had a documented paper trail on all the components.

My Tbird for example. Bought new by my Dad and Mom. I do have a lot of the original documentation from when the car was bought new and never have seen the engine number recorded on any of it. Don't think the FE engines even have a serial number??? just a date code. My engine has been changed. You can't tell it's not the OEM 352 without looking at the date code numbers on the block. In a show judges might look for that sort of thing so once again - if the car was to be shown it would matter.

Since the engine numbers are not recorded (that I know of - even on my build sheet) it would make a slight difference IMHO. If someone bought your car and wanted to make a show car out of it they would have to factor in finding a correct engine for the car, rebuilding and installing. Maybe 10-25% of the value?

Heck - even on my OEM engine the intake number is a '61 production number. I'm 99.9% sure it was never changed but it would be hard to prove. Judges would probably count off points for the '61 intake on a '60 car (until it was proven that late production '60 Tbirds were fitted with early '61 parts - which is what I believe happened).

On the other hand if a fellow wanted it to drive. A rebuilt FE might be a plus to that buyer (original type engine not necessarily the original one)

An then for the street rod buyer - he might love to see a modern fuel injected Lincoln Navigator engine in there and would not pay as much for the OEM style FE engine in it.

All a big gamble really and depends on the buyer. I'd say if you have what you think is the OEM engine and can keep it to sell with the car that's what I would do. If the buyer doesn't care about it then you can just sell it.

JMHO

Eric
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  #23  
Old 06-12-2017, 10:53 AM
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jopizz jopizz is offline
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Don't buy any engine parts until a machine shop inspects your block and determines what bore size they can safely go with. You can buy the full FE gasket kit as you will need that regardless of what engine you rebuild. I also recommend putting a new front seal and front pump bushing and o-ring in your transmission. As for originality Ford didn't put VIN numbers on engine blocks, only date codes. I wouldn't worry about it affecting the value. You can take the alternator to just about any auto store and they will test it for free. It's most likely a low amp alternator so it doesn't have much value.

John
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  #24  
Old 06-12-2017, 11:42 AM
pbf777 pbf777 is offline
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Just my opinion: REBUILD THE ORIGINAL ENGINE, correct for the car.

Find a competent shop to provide fair and honest rebuilding services, communicate, and "pay-the-price". Face the fact, that with old cars come repairs, and in the long-run, this will provide far less headache, and prove far less expensive, then most other processes trying to get it done cheaply.

For the experience, and/or to reduce costs, one may chose to be more "involved" and "participate" to varying degrees, and this is K.O.; but, with less knowledge, or interest in turning the wrench ones' self, comes more of the assistance as outlined above.

The cost difference, of rebuilding the 352 vs. a 390 is not significantly greater (if at all, each example proves unique); but with the wrong engine present, the devaluation of your vehicle will be.

Generally, installing an engine other than that which the vehicle was originally equipped is due to the original not being of rebuildable condition, not available, or did not/will not provide suitable performance (defined with many perspectives) for intended purpose. None of these scenarios would seem to enhance the potential collectability (value) of your vehicle.

Scott.
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  #25  
Old 06-12-2017, 12:16 PM
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I found a place in Houston that will do the entire long block rebuild for $1700. That doesnt seen too bad.

I just need to sell the extra motor that i bought.
Anyone interested in it lol.
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  #26  
Old 06-12-2017, 12:38 PM
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jopizz jopizz is offline
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If you plan on upgrading to an alternator you might want to think about rebuilding the new block you bought. That one has the hole drilled for the alternator mounting bolt. Your old block does not. It's much easier mounting an alternator using the original Ford brackets than fabricating new ones.

John
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  #27  
Old 06-12-2017, 10:35 PM
Woobie Woobie is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StealthSRT10 View Post
That had crossed my mind. Just to reassemble the origional on the engine stand.

Hopefully parting out the extra engine i bought isnt what i have to do.

Either way. What is the order i should buy my parts in.

Like i believe i need to buy over sized pistons and the shop will have to machine to the piston.

How does eveyone feel about the "engine rebuild kits"?

Then you have determined the 59 needs more than just ring job, valve lap and stem seals.

Too bad about the truck 352. That sludge is a bear to clean up, huh ? And then there is the oil pickup screen.

If you are looking to have a restored Tbird or just a beater would make a difference to me for resale. In other words if I buy an original that rolls off the transport with a 390 there will be trouble.
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