This will take you to the main site where there is history, technical information and other information on these cars.
This takes you back to the main page of the forums.
This is the control panel to change your password, information and preferences on this message board.
Click here if your lost your password or need to register on this message board. You must be a registered user to post. Registration is free.
Search this board for information you need.
Click here to buy cool Squarebirds mechandise.
Click here to support Squarebirds.org. For $20 annually receive 20mBytes webspace, a Squarebirds e-mail address and member's icon on the message board.
  #1  
Old 09-19-2017, 04:35 PM
430bird60 430bird60 is offline
Apprentice
 
Join Date: Dec 30 2008
Posts: 71
430bird60 is on a distinguished road
Default Brake Shoes

I recently purchased Centric riveted brake shoes from Rock Auto. As I was installing them I noticed that the rivets on the front shoes were closer to the surface than the rivets on the back shoes. I measured the thickness on the shoes and found the front shoe to be about 5/32 and the back shoe to be about 7/32. I then measured the rivet depth from the surface of the shoes. The front shoes measured 1/32 and the back 3/32. These measurements are from a set not front axle and rear axle. I am really concerned about that 1/32 measurement and how much braking until the drums need turning. Anyone know if these shoes are defective based on my measurements or are they normal for new shoes? Thanks

Ken
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 09-19-2017, 05:27 PM
jopizz's Avatar
jopizz jopizz is online now
Excellent Auto Mechanic for over 40 years.
 
Join Date: Nov 23 2009
Posts: 4,843
jopizz is on a distinguished road
Default

I wouldn't say they are defective but not all shoes are created equal. I tend to stick with Wagner or Raybestos when it comes to brake shoes or pads. I would call and tell them your concerns and see what they say. If you're not comfortable with the amount of lining then don't install them. Most of the wear is probably going to be on the back shoe so maybe that's why it's thicker. I've never had an issue with Rockauto when returning parts if you want to try another brand.

John
__________________
John Pizzi - Squarebirds Administrator
1959 Convertible

Thunderbird Registry #36223
jopizz@verizon.net 856-779-9695

http://www.squarebirds.org/picture_gallery/TechnicalResourceLibrary/trl.htm
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 09-19-2017, 10:19 PM
bird 60 bird 60 is offline
Super-Experienced
 
Join Date: Mar 18 2009
Posts: 839
bird 60 is on a distinguished road
Question Brake Shoes

Hi John, I was always under the impression that the "front'' shoes would wear out first, as they take more of the brunt.

Chris......From OZ.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 09-19-2017, 10:27 PM
jopizz's Avatar
jopizz jopizz is online now
Excellent Auto Mechanic for over 40 years.
 
Join Date: Nov 23 2009
Posts: 4,843
jopizz is on a distinguished road
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bird 60 View Post
Hi John, I was always under the impression that the "front'' shoes would wear out first, as they take more of the brunt.

Chris......From OZ.
The secondary shoe (rear) is longer and seems to take the brunt of the force in my experience. I could be wrong.

John
__________________
John Pizzi - Squarebirds Administrator
1959 Convertible

Thunderbird Registry #36223
jopizz@verizon.net 856-779-9695

http://www.squarebirds.org/picture_gallery/TechnicalResourceLibrary/trl.htm
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 09-20-2017, 11:22 AM
Deanj Deanj is offline
Experienced
 
Join Date: Nov 26 2015
Posts: 366
Deanj is on a distinguished road
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jopizz View Post
I wouldn't say they are defective but not all shoes are created equal. I tend to stick with Wagner or Raybestos when it comes to brake shoes or pads.
John
I can't speak about drums and shoes, but Centric seems to sell quality parts. I like their rotors because they paint or powder coat the hat on the rotor. Their pads are positive molded.

I'd had planned on buying Centric, but I'll switch if Wagner and Raybestos has a superior brake shoe.

Dean
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 09-20-2017, 01:43 PM
simplyconnected's Avatar
simplyconnected simplyconnected is offline
Slow Typist
 
Join Date: May 26 2009
Posts: 7,130
simplyconnected is on a distinguished road
Default

This business of 'brake shoes' is tricky. I've seen many combinations over the years.

Primary and Secondary shoes are normally identified by 'PRI' or 'SEC' but not always Some are made of different materials (hardness) which are different in color. Some are longer than the other but not always.

The front shoe requires less pressure, to produce the same braking power as the rear. In other words, the drum rotation 'helps apply' pressure to the front shoe. The easiest way I can explain this is by citing hand brakes on a bicycle or motorcycle. A light pressure on the front brake does far more braking then a lot of pressure on the rear brake.

Bottom line: This is a system that brake companies engineered to balance braking power. Shoes MUST be installed correctly according to the Shop Manual and the manufacturer's instructions.

BTW, my personal preference is, bonded brakes. I've always had good luck with them but I 'stay on top' of the lining or pad wear. I also choose the softest material I can find. It wears out faster but also stops easier without chatter. - Dave
__________________
My latest project:
CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

"We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
--Lee Iacocca
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 09-21-2017, 04:53 PM
Tbird6 Tbird6 is offline
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jul 3 2017
Posts: 22
Tbird6 is on a distinguished road
Default

Another vote to ditch the rivets and go with bonded brake shoes.
.
.
.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 09-21-2017, 05:05 PM
simplyconnected's Avatar
simplyconnected simplyconnected is offline
Slow Typist
 
Join Date: May 26 2009
Posts: 7,130
simplyconnected is on a distinguished road
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tbird6 View Post
Another vote to ditch the rivets and go with bonded brake shoes...
As long as there is lining left on the shoe, I don't think it matters if you have bonded or riveted (except in the Rust Belt).

I have to confess, I know of a Dodge car in the family that sat for many months. When they fired it up, one of the rear brake linings came off the shoe from rust. It was bonded.

That lining jammed the rear wheel right in the driveway. It could have been much worse. I've never seen a riveted lining come off the shoe from rust or otherwise. Again, I stay on top to prevent problems. - Dave
__________________
My latest project:
CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

"We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
--Lee Iacocca
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:34 PM.

Driving, racing or working on cars can be hazardous. The procedures and advice on this website including the message board are opinion only. Squarebirds.org and its webmasters and contributors do not guarantee the correctness of the advice and procedures. The Squarebirds.org and its webmasters assume no liability for any damage, fines, punishment, injury or death resulting from following these procedures or advice. If you do not have the skills or tools to repair your car, please consult a professional. By using this site you agree to hold harmless the Squarebirds.org, its authors and its webmasters from any resulting claim and costs that may occur from using the information found on this site.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Any submissions to this site and any post on this site becomes property of Squarebirds.org . The webmasters reserve the right to edit and modify any submissions to this site. All material on this is site is copyrighted by the Squarebirds.org. Reproduction by any means other than for personal use is strictly prohibited. Permission to use material on this site can be obtained by contacting the webmasters. Copyright 2002-2016 by Squarebirds.org.